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Late Season Cold Weather Preserves Lousy Skiing

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
We finally get the weather turned around here in the MidAtlantic with consistently cold temps, but snowmaking has been abandoned for the year and the cold weather preserves the frozen granular.

If its a toss up between skiing FG and not skiing, I think not skiing wins for me. Maybe I'LL regret it in a couple of weeks when the season is over and I'm mowing the lawn wishing I was skiing on any surface instead, but I just can't stand skiing FG.

Can anybody here ramp up their fun meter skiing on FG and actually have a good ski day? I'll take a slush bump day hands down.
post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
We finally get the weather turned around here in the MidAtlantic with consistently cold temps, but snowmaking has been abandoned for the year and the cold weather preserves the frozen granular.

If its a toss up between skiing FG and not skiing, I think not skiing wins for me. Maybe I'LL regret it in a couple of weeks when the season is over and I'm mowing the lawn wishing I was skiing on any surface instead, but I just can't stand skiing FG.

Can anybody here ramp up their fun meter skiing on FG and actually have a good ski day? I'll take a slush bump day hands down.
When you ski the Catskills you have to deal with FG or you're not going skiing. I ski on weekdays so i just fly around on it. I'm waiting for it to warm up so the bumps get a little easier to deal with. In my little opinion those that can ski ice bumps are the best on the mountain.
post #3 of 19
roundturns, sorry to hear that they have stopped making snow. Is FG something like loose granular? or are they different? Where I am, they have loose granular now. I'd still prefer skiing to not skiing . I think if there is somewhat white stuff over the brown ground, I'd ski it .
post #4 of 19
Maybe I just like skiing more than you or maybe I just find skiing challenging snow more interesting than you, but I can't ever remember being healthy and whining about the snow. Oh, I wish every day lead to skiing 45-degree steeps on 2' of 7% snow but it doesn't. Some days are freezing rain and Breakable Crust over Cascade Concrete, other days are 4' of 20% snow, and yet others are 8" deep Sun Cups or 12" deep Coral Reef. I like 'em all. After all it's better than working or mowing the lawn or, well, about anything really.

But complaining about Frozen Granular is just odd. It's not perfect but much better than the technical snows I mentioned above.

Take a year off and see if that makes skiing more enjoyable. But for me I treasure every ski day just as I treasure every day with my family. After all I will never get that time back and I will never be as young or as capable as I am today.

Mark
post #5 of 19
Skiing FG>not skiing

It makes you better.
Ski the scheisse or be scheisse.
post #6 of 19
They haven't abandoned snowmaking everywhere in the mid-A. Wisp and Snowshoe are still blowing (though minimal). In fact, there's a nice pic of it on www.dcski.com.

I skied some frozen corduroy last week, and it was quite nice for fast carving. As the day wore on, it got softer and more fun. If the resort stays on top of grooming, the FG surfaces can be great with sharp skis. If ungroomed slop freezes hard (=chicken heads), then it's downright unsafe and I would stay off it for sure!

I also skied re-freezing slush last week, and it was probably the toughest skiing I have done in years. The stuff was really heavy and hard to turn in, and also collected on the skis, boots, and bindings weighing them down. The bottom of my pant legs were totally iced up by the end of the day. Anything would be easier than that stuff.
post #7 of 19
I would say coral ice is the worst. I believe Pierre is the expert on that.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219
They haven't abandoned snowmaking everywhere in the mid-A. Wisp and Snowshoe are still blowing (though minimal). In fact, there's a nice pic of it on www.dcski.com.

I skied some frozen corduroy last week, and it was quite nice for fast carving. As the day wore on, it got softer and more fun. If the resort stays on top of grooming, the FG surfaces can be great with sharp skis. If ungroomed slop freezes hard (=chicken heads), then it's downright unsafe and I would stay off it for sure!

I also skied re-freezing slush last week, and it was probably the toughest skiing I have done in years. The stuff was really heavy and hard to turn in, and also collected on the skis, boots, and bindings weighing them down. The bottom of my pant legs were totally iced up by the end of the day. Anything would be easier than that stuff.
Yes, drive to Wisp, they claim to be making snow... it's not too far to keep it up a few more weeks! Give good ol' Deep Creek a whirl! :
post #9 of 19
As I sit here with my morning coffee and bagel, watching it dumping, my Son is bitching because his baseball game on Monday doesn't look like it will happen, the snowmobiles ae looking lonely and sad, the skis are still packed in the ski bag from my recent trip, edges no doubt rusting, the golf clubs are franticly waiting, lets put an end to the dismal ski season we've had here in WNY and let Spring happen, huh?

Where the hell was this when we wanted it?
post #10 of 19
Yeah, we got a dusting of snow last night, and it's in the low 30s this morning. Where the he!! was this weather in January and February?!?!:

The ski areas here have been closed for over a week, and I'm ready for it to get warm out. Normally, I don't mind riding my bike in the cold, but I'm not in the mood for it lately, so I haven't ridden my bike to work in 2 weeks. Enough already!
post #11 of 19
I spent 27 years skiing Camelback in the Poconos and I can tell you I never turned up my nose at anything. The season was too short to be evaluating the surface. Now that I am out west, I've become much pickier, but then I've doubled the number of days I ski and the season is a month longer on either end.
post #12 of 19
Well roundturns, I don't know what to say. I've been skiing 7 Springs so long I can ski it backward while blindfolded on one ski; FG, slush or powder.... well, no I can't. I need both skis and powder will be tricky 'cause I haven't been in it in since last season. I guess it was a good year to have a broken elbow, the season here was that bad. Beside I know I'd just put myself in a situation where I'd have to make a blocking left pole plant and I'd just collapse and whimper.

I think my season is done. I just got back from 7 Springs and ripped that frozen granular. I had fun carving the ice on my SLs after all the granular was pushed to the side but enough is enough.

What really sucked about this season was because of my darn elbow I haven't been able to work since June therefore no money to chase the real natural up north or out west. Now that is something to complain about.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
I spent 27 years skiing Camelback in the Poconos and I can tell you I never turned up my nose at anything. The season was too short to be evaluating the surface. Now that I am out west, I've become much pickier, but then I've doubled the number of days I ski and the season is a month longer on either end.
we were there over the same time, i'd imagine we rode the "Sullivan chair" once or twice together .

But I's sooner NOT ski in Pa than to ski on the garbage that the blow in the Poc's, let alone what they did to homoginize Camelback.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
No doubt its what you make it, and I will try again Sat. But its unfortunate that the sustained cold weather we've been having was preceded with the big thaw and meltdown right before it. I hate to see the leaves from the snowless woods blowing across the snow. The beer cans from November that are now exposed also is an indication the season is on its last legs.
post #15 of 19
If there is white stuff on the ground you ski it. Don't be such a wus. Sking crappy conditions makes you a better skier.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Residing here in SW Pa. the last 26 years , trust me, I have skied my quota of crappy conditions.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTT
If there is white stuff on the ground you ski it. Don't be such a wus. Sking crappy conditions makes you a better skier.
Yeah, what about grey stuff? Believe me, the conditions here are not what I call challenging. The conditions are just plain crappy. What roundturns is lamenting is the fickle weather that would have served us better if this cold snap would have come in January. So goes Mid-Atlantic skiing, Western PA in particular. Have a little sympathy.
post #18 of 19
SC, you're skiing again. Excellent!
post #19 of 19
Thanks comprex, Yes, I've been out a few times since the surgery. Conditions have been as such that rigorous use of my left arm hasn't been necessary.

If you recall I won some K2 skis last season at the Eastern tune up. It took awhile to settle on the Recons and when they finally arrived, the season was over. Well, you know conditions this year. I've not been on them yet. I mean why scratch up the bases of a wide waisted ski when my SLs are so obviously the ski of choice on the boilerplate machine made we've had most of the season?

Yes, I'm skiing again and I'm enjoying what I can but like roundturns I'm wishing we'd get just one huge dump before the local areas close.
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