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Powderhungry Norwegians Skiers on the way to Utah...Need Help to fulfill dream...!!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
SKI LOVING NORWEGIANS DREAMING OF UTAH POWDER

Dear all forum members.

First I must say that I am a big fan of this forum.

We are three Norwegian skiing enthusiasts 28 – 32 years of age wanting to travel over the Atlantic to discover some of the dry powder in Utah. Over the years many tales about the skiing in Utah have wandered over the “pond” to Norway from ski magazines and from friends. The urge to experience the dry Utah powder have now risen to such extremes that we are in fact now planning a trip for next winter. The problem or should we say the challenge is to get the greatest skiing experience possible without ending up totally broke. From what I have read the accommodation prices in some of the places seem quite high (ex Deer Valley which don’t offer special prices to Norwegian ski bums even though Stein Eriksen is a Norwegian. Hehe.). It is a long way to fly and we are planning to stay for 2 weeks so we are hoping to get the maximum skiing experience from our hard earned dollars. Our focus is on skiing deep powder. Groomed pists are not of major interest even though a nice high speed run is nice for a warm up. Off-Pist is usually the way we ski back home (if possible) but it seems to me that powder is avaliable in Utah without having to walk to far. Am i right? Anyway, we are willing to walk for a bit to get to the best descents if needed if the reward is worth while. .
All 3 of us are good technical skiers, having spent 25 years each in Norwegian mountains. Deep powder skills are quite good but not excellent. Last year we went to Italy and did a full week of powder in Courmayeaur and in the mountains close to Mont Blanc, Chamonix. It was awesome. There have been som nice powder days this season in our home country as well but they are far apart. We are looking for something better. We were hoping that Utah could provide us with the ultimate powder experience. So we are extremely grateful for good tips and advice that can help us achieve this dream. Some of the questions we would love to have answered would be:


- Which resort or should I say resorts should we visit. Luxury is not important. We will be in Utah to ski not to get pampered. A moderate price is important but we are definitely willing to pay the little extra if the skiing turns out to be better. We have heard some good things about Alta but we are open for all suggestions. Hints and tips about accommodation, motels, hotels, apartment hotels, trips, good powder runs and so on are appreciated.

- What time of year should we go for the ultimate powder experience ?

- We are today skiing on midfats. Ex. Rossignol B3 120 – 84 – 110. Are these fat enough for the Utah powder days.?

- We are planning on going cat-skiing but we are also dreaming of a heli lift… is it worth the extra cash..?

We are hoping for some good input and we highly appreciate all the feedback we can get… and if someone is in the neighbourhood when we are visiting we would love to ski with someone with local knowledge. Good guides will be paid in Beers…



Jonas, Martin and Christian.
post #2 of 11
In a nutshell:

Stay in one of Salt Lake's cheaper suburbs: Sandy/Midvalle/Holliday. You will find hotel rooms in the $40 - 80 range (dirt cheap for the US). Wait until you get here to decide on which resort(s) to ski, as you can make up your mind that morning, based on the current conditions. Go in Jan. or Feb. for the best chance at optimal conditions. Mid fats will work, but wider skis can make it easier (but less fun because they float too high). Since you are from Scandinavia, why not hike/skin up the Wasatch, which is one of the best BC areas in the world (get a guide if you need to!) and save yourself your hard earned money?

Good Luck,

Powdr
post #3 of 11
How about Hostels. I don't know if Utah has them, but a lot of Europeans, and others use them to keep costs down.
A heli trip will set you back some cash, about six to eight hundred for the day. If you catch things right you won't need one to get good powder.
As far as off piste, if you don't know the areas it might be risky without a guide of some kind. I would hook up with a local for that.As far as when is the best time. I've had luck Jan., Feb, March, and even mid April. You have to keep an eye on all the weather reports.
post #4 of 11
go through the threads in this forum you will find plenty about Utah hotels. I stay at the La Quinta, Midvale. We had a group this year and it cost $59/nt, including breakfast.(more than adequate). Place is clean, modern and nice and 25 minutes to Snowbird. There are PLENTY of hotels rooms in Salt Lake City, no need to worry about booking too early.

Just know there is not always Utah powder to be found, at times it doesn't snow for a week or two, then sometimes it snows 6" just about every day, like almost everyday this month, just look at Alta Snow History link, http://www.alta.com/pages/snowhistory.php . But the odds are certainly in your favor for 2 wks. It snows the same in March as in Jan/March but the conditions can be more apt to deteriorite in March because of the higher sun and warmer temps. therefore more damage, with no fresh snow. Skip Presidents Day weekend, Feb 17th-20th, crowds.

Itinerary for the best skiing/conditions/expert terrain ski
1. Little Cottonwood Canyon - Snowbird and Alta - 2 days each
3. Snowbasin 1 day
4. Powder Mtn - if they have fresh snow - 1 day
4. Big Cottonwood Canyon - Solititude or Brighton - 1 day
5. Park City Resorts - Park City Mtn Resort - 1 day
That's 8 days of skiing.

If you are staying for 2 weeks you should definitely go North 5 hrs and ski Jackson Hole for at least 2 days, plus another at Grand Targhee. That will give you a chance to experience a whole different type of american culture.
Wyoming - 3 days

Have fun - Ski SLC for 4 days, drive up to Wyoming for 3 days of skiing, then back to SLC for 4 more days.

That'll be a ski vacation you never forget!
post #5 of 11
See, it's working already.
post #6 of 11
Hejsan!

Keep in mind that Utah has some screwy liqour laws -- not as controlled as, say, Sweden -- but weird in their own way. (The locals can fill you in on the ropes.) But rest... it wont be anywhere as expensive as back home.
adjö,
David
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetsuma
Hejsan!

Keep in mind that Utah has some screwy liqour laws -- not as controlled as, say, Sweden -- but weird in their own way. (The locals can fill you in on the ropes.) But rest... it wont be anywhere as expensive as back home.
adjö,
David
Real booze must be bought at state liquor stores. This equals expensive.
post #8 of 11
>We are planning on going cat-skiing but we are also dreaming of a heli lift… is it worth the extra cash..?

to me it never has been, if it snows, by skiing in the storm, you should get in plenty of powder turns. For someone on a "budget", i don't think it represents good value, better off to put that $$$ towards a plane ticket to come back next year
post #9 of 11
Rather then going Heli skiing, look into doing a back country tour. There are a few excellent guild services in the Wasatch. They can show you some of the Wasatch Back country. This area is very unique becuse it is so close to a major urban center and very accessible. But it also remains very wild and challenging on many levels By the way I also think Jackson Hole is well worth the drive
post #10 of 11
"We R tree wild an crasee guise"

Circa Steve Martin, Saturday Night Live.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powdr
In a nutshell:

Stay in one of Salt Lake's cheaper suburbs: Sandy/Midvalle/Holliday. You will find hotel rooms in the $40 - 80 range (dirt cheap for the US). Wait until you get here to decide on which resort(s) to ski, as you can make up your mind that morning, based on the current conditions. Go in Jan. or Feb. for the best chance at optimal conditions. Mid fats will work, but wider skis can make it easier (but less fun because they float too high). Since you are from Scandinavia, why not hike/skin up the Wasatch, which is one of the best BC areas in the world (get a guide if you need to!) and save yourself your hard earned money?

Good Luck,

Powdr
I am in complete agreement. That is exactly what I would have said, no more, no less. I often disagree with powdr, but this is the way to do it, without a doubt.
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