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Are HSQs Part of the Problem? - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LCS
Sorry, I can't help myself. I feel the need to pick a nit. Nits, not KNits, are lice eggs picked out of hair strands. Hence the saying 'picking nits". Knit is the opposite of purl.
What is it called when you purled when you were supposed to have knitted, and you go back and pull the yarn out? Can that be considered knit picking?
post #32 of 38
Sure, the math works great. The chairs are spaced twice as far apart but travel twice as fast when they are on the cable of a HSQ. But two things I see as reality, as opposed to numbers, are 1) on a crowded day, a fixie stops a LOT more often because it's harder to load. And where I ski, when the HSQ stops, it does not stop for long (no longer than the fixie). and 2) on the days when it's not crowded, the HSQ gets you to the top a whole lot faster.

Therefore, and in conculsion, the HSQ has a speed advantage whether it's crowded or not.

That said, I'm glad we have a fixie that services our only bump run, because if not, I'd probably get hurt due to lack of resting time between runs. Oh, and get this.... The lazy bum who is the only guy working the base of the fixie where our bump run is, stays inside the shack while people are loading, so as soon as the skier is about to get scooped up, he slows it down, then speeds it back up once the person is on. This slows the whole cable, so everyone's ride is made longer as you constantly speed up and slow down on your way up the hill.:
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Proton
The other thing I wonder about is whether fast lifts can lead folks to ski more than is really advisable for their level of fitness. I realize that skier visits are flat, but that does not mean that skier runs per visit have declined.
If folks ski more than is advisable for their fitness level, that's their call. Nobody (especially the resorts) should be worrying about HSQs being too taking for those that aren't in shape. That is each skier's individual decision. PLEASE, do not let the Democrats take over our ski lifts! (Ok, I can say that, I'm a Recovering Democrat).

Has anyone seen the HS lifts at some of the European resorts? They just use the old standard lifts, but they put turbo motors on them or something, because these things haul, and they are not detachable. It's pretty scary the first couple of times. What they did was installed those magic carpet things to aid you in getting on and off. You get on the magic carpet and it speeds you to about the same speed as the lift, then you get on the chair. Same thing for getting off. You unload onto the magic carpet, then it dumps you off on the slope. Pretty cool, and probably saves a couple million $$ per lift.
post #34 of 38

Knit1, purl2 repeat to end

Quote:
Originally Posted by Docjoque
What is it called when you purled when you were supposed to have knitted, and you go back and pull the yarn out? Can that be considered knit picking?
Hmmm, I think it must be so! I have lots of 'knit picking' under my belt also!
This is a terrible hijack, I do apologize.
Back to the problems of HSQ's
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docjoque
Has anyone seen the HS lifts at some of the European resorts? They just use the old standard lifts, but they put turbo motors on them or something, because these things haul, and they are not detachable. It's pretty scary the first couple of times. What they did was installed those magic carpet things to aid you in getting on and off. You get on the magic carpet and it speeds you to about the same speed as the lift, then you get on the chair. Same thing for getting off. You unload onto the magic carpet, then it dumps you off on the slope. Pretty cool, and probably saves a couple million $$ per lift.
I like! And if they haven't removed half of the chairs from the cable, it actually does increase the uphill capacity.
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Sure, the math works great. The chairs are spaced twice as far apart but travel twice as fast when they are on the cable of a HSQ. But two things I see as reality, as opposed to numbers
Right. It's a known fact that in the real world a HSQ increases lift capacity 10-18% because of fewer stops. Perhaps surprising, loading gates help a lot, especially in beginner areas, though they could be put in a fixed grip terminal as well.
post #37 of 38
HSQs don't effect crowding as much on the toughest terrain and hardly at all on the hike terrain. That's about all I care about at the resort. Those guys are more than welcome to their crowds on the groomers. The only time that bothers me is my last run of the day. Actually, it does bother me a little on that run... the most dangerous run of my day.

You just have to plan where you're going a little bit better and decide which lifts to ride and which to avoid.
post #38 of 38
Yo Pete

That's true. At Jiminy Peak we have a 6 pack. It really flys and takes 6 at a time. At the top, even on a crowded day no one skis the steep trails which means no crowd on the slope. The easy trails are mobbed - like skiing in Japan.
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