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When is your Skiing Prime? - Page 4

post #91 of 106
In your prime skiing is much like the young and old bull standing together looking over the herd.

Shall we run down and cover a couple of them, or move in calmly and cover the entire herd? ;-)

"Prime" is often just making good decisions.

Now, If i could just recover quickly enough to get to really enjoy.....
post #92 of 106
This thread reminds me of an experience 4 years ago at Whistler/Blackcomb. I took advantage of a free 3 hr expert level tour of Whistler Mtn. When the guide showed up I was somewhat concerned that she looked to be in her mid sixties and began to think I was with the beginner or intermediate groups. Let me tell you Fran was one of the best skiers I have ever had the pleasure to spend time with on the mountain. She had perfect form and outskied the entire group of young "hotshots". By the end of the tour everyone but Fran was exhausted and struggling to keep up. Both she and the members participating in this thread should be an inspiration to all of us under the age of 50.

As for me, at age 38 I feel my skiing gets better every year. After two weekends on my recently purchased mid-fat boards, I am a big proponent of "new" technology. I, too, look forward to skiing in my 80s.
post #93 of 106
Skiing is a very unique sport when it comes to aging. On the one hand, youth has the advantage in that they generally learn quicker, are naturally more likely to be risk takers, and they heal from injuries faster which keeps them from being afraid, and also allows them to be on the hill more to tune their performance.

On the other hand, skiing is a very technical sport, and there is no substitute for experience and time on the hill, giving the advantage to older skiers. Because skiing is so technical, equipment also plays a large role, and as a skier matures, it is inevitable that their new and improved equipment is going to improve their skiing as well. Also, strength helps skiers, especially if they are racing events such as downhill where it is possible for the body to experience forces of up to 4 G's. People continue to get stronger until their late 30's or early 40's.

Having said that, I believe for competitive skiing, with the factors of fitness, ability to train long, hard hours, injury recovery, fearlessness, experience and technical ability combined, an athlete will usually peak around age 25 or 26, though they may remain at that peak for ten years before they see any real noticeable decline in their skills. I think this is true because fearlessness and aggression play a much larger part in the equation.

For recreational skiing skills though, where taking intense risks isn't nearly such a large part, I would suggest that there is no reason a skier should peak before their 40's or 50's, as long as they are mindful of their fitness.

Our bodies seem to be changing. 40 seems to be the new 30, or younger even. While most people think of skateboarding as a teenager's sport, I still skate in skateparks, bowls and pools all the time with a group who are all in their mid 30's to mid 40's, despite the fact concrete and wood are far less forgiving than snow. We don't fly down handrails or bounce off the concrete like we used to, and we definitely don't take the same risks as the younger guys, but we still get out there and rip it up, and plan to do so as long as we can. There's no reason older skiers shouldn't make skateboarders in their 40's look like young punks!
post #94 of 106
My prime happens whenever I'm healthy. (Which isn't too often) I'm always improving technically, but I've had escalating joint and bone problems since I was about 14. I was healthy for most of the year this year (so far), besides recovering from an elbow replacement I had in October, so this year might be my prime. I like that.
post #95 of 106
Hasn't happened yet.
post #96 of 106

prime

Been skiing since 30 and am 63 now. Physical prime started downhill at 37yrs when I noticed my 3rd base reflexes weren't what they usead to be. However regarding skiing I still feel like I'm in my prime. Yes I have substituted ability, experience, feel and awareness for muscle but actually ski better. Can ski all day and ski about 55-75 days a year. Mt age now makes me more aware; that you can see Half Dome from the top of the Gondola at Mammoth, that Lake Pend Orleille is beautiful from Schweitzer, that Tahoe is breaktaking from Homewood, Diamond Peak, Alpine, Northstar or Heavenly, that the distant Canadian Rockies are magnificent on a clea day from No. Idaho; Beginners are cute, fun and curious and Gapers are really mostly yuppies who have no clue about life, that I often stop and watch a really great skier or rider kniving through the trees or off the fingers at Sugar Bowl, that sometimes snow is really beautiful to ski and see. Trees are oftentimes awesome in the fact they can actually live through a winter of ice and snow so thick your can't see any green at all. The realization that I grew up as a skier is when I realized one day no one really cares how I ski except me. Sometimes I'm ok, sometimes I think I'm really good and then sometimes I think I stink - so what who cares. Theres always someone out there better and always someone worse. Aside from the turns, the powder, chutes, cornice jumping and the moguls there is one overwhelming influence that skiing has had on my life - the friends I have made, to ski with and play golf and fish with gthroughout the year. Do I feel the years going by, sure do so: no teaching next year I'm off to ski Canada, JH, Targhee, Big Mt. etc. etc. Going to go do it before the years say I can't. Sorry if windy just felt sort of nostalgic. Off the bed gotta ski tommorrow. Pete
post #97 of 106
Been skiing since 12 and now 42, so 30 years on the snow. Technicly I am a far superior skier now than I ever was. I still love bumps but will not ski ice bumps just to ski bumps. I still love speed, but I am more aware of the surroundings. I still love doing helicopters, but I pick and choose my jumps (and I make sure I do at least one every year).

On the snow, I am a better ski. Once I get in the air, I am past my prime.
post #98 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Been skiing since 12 and now 42, so 30 years on the snow. Technicly I am a far superior skier now than I ever was. I still love bumps but will not ski ice bumps just to ski bumps. I still love speed, but I am more aware of the surroundings. I still love doing helicopters, but I pick and choose my jumps (and I make sure I do at least one every year).

On the snow, I am a better ski. Once I get in the air, I am past my prime.
???? you mean once you're in the air, or once you land again?
post #99 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
???? you mean once you're in the air, or once you land again?
I am not as comfortible in the air as I used to be, I don't remember the last time I got over 3' of air doing a helicopter let along the 6'ers I used to float when I was "younger". And seeing the big air these kids are getting off these huge terrain park jumps is very humbling.
post #100 of 106
air's fine.
landings get harder later in life
post #101 of 106
When I played semi-pro hockey, I felt like I was playing the best at age 40. The smartness factor was kicking in and if I had lost a step, I don't think so, it was compensated by savy.

I think my overall skiing performance was at it's best around the same time or shortly after. I was big into raceing then and always seemed to finish near the top all the time unless it was a DNF.

My skiing at 55 is still very good and in fact am doing stuff now that would most likely look like I'm on a suicide mission. At least that's what my Wife thinks. But the rest is going downhill. I can't hike as far or as fast at altitude as five years ago. After skiing hard all day, I'm done earlier. I'm still skiing bumps but now have to stop halfway down the run usually for a breather. I don't ski bump runs all day long anymore. But I don't avoid them either. I think modern equipment has aded alot to everyone my age so that is compensation. But, as skills go, I'd put myself up against most anyone anyday.

I'd put myself in my skiing prime at age 45-47
post #102 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
When I played semi-pro hockey, I felt like I was playing the best at age 40. The smartness factor was kicking in and if I had lost a step, I don't think so, it was compensated by savy.

I think my overall skiing performance was at it's best around the same time or shortly after. I was big into raceing then and always seemed to finish near the top all the time unless it was a DNF.

My skiing at 55 is still very good and in fact am doing stuff now that would most likely look like I'm on a suicide mission. At least that's what my Wife thinks. But the rest is going downhill. I can't hike as far or as fast at altitude as five years ago. After skiing hard all day, I'm done earlier. I'm still skiing bumps but now have to stop halfway down the run usually for a breather. I don't ski bump runs all day long anymore. But I don't avoid them either. I think modern equipment has aded alot to everyone my age so that is compensation. But, as skills go, I'd put myself up against most anyone anyday.

I'd put myself in my skiing prime at age 45-47
excellent piece of perspective.
in hockey, of course, you have to rely on fast-twitch muscles response much more so that in skiing.
something about hockey makes for really strong, fearless, fast skiers.
The best staff trainer at the old Great Gorge resort (1980s) was a huge hockey player and an amazing skier (ex-UVM racer/lev III psia). I saw him frequently at Mountain Creek South this past season (he and many of the old school, including many of the austrians from the '60s school, skied together this season, weekday mornings).
He'd been off skis and skates, as far as I knew, for a few years, his knees were worse than mine and he's flyiong more than ever before.
anyway, this season, he typically left the hill after a day's playing, to get to his club-league hockey workouts...he's 45 and (exactly as lars would have it) says he's playing as well as ever.
You hockey guys impress me.
Oh, yeah- Joan Heaton and Jeff Bergeron: Kenny Knoll says "Hi"
post #103 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
Been skiing since 30 and am 63 now. Physical prime started downhill at 37yrs when I noticed my 3rd base reflexes weren't what they usead to be. However regarding skiing I still feel like I'm in my prime. Yes I have substituted ability, experience, feel and awareness for muscle but actually ski better. Can ski all day and ski about 55-75 days a year. Mt age now makes me more aware; that you can see Half Dome from the top of the Gondola at Mammoth, that Lake Pend Orleille is beautiful from Schweitzer, that Tahoe is breaktaking from Homewood, Diamond Peak, Alpine, Northstar or Heavenly, that the distant Canadian Rockies are magnificent on a clea day from No. Idaho; Beginners are cute, fun and curious and Gapers are really mostly yuppies who have no clue about life, that I often stop and watch a really great skier or rider kniving through the trees or off the fingers at Sugar Bowl, that sometimes snow is really beautiful to ski and see. Trees are oftentimes awesome in the fact they can actually live through a winter of ice and snow so thick your can't see any green at all. The realization that I grew up as a skier is when I realized one day no one really cares how I ski except me. Sometimes I'm ok, sometimes I think I'm really good and then sometimes I think I stink - so what who cares. Theres always someone out there better and always someone worse. Aside from the turns, the powder, chutes, cornice jumping and the moguls there is one overwhelming influence that skiing has had on my life - the friends I have made, to ski with and play golf and fish with gthroughout the year. Do I feel the years going by, sure do so: no teaching next year I'm off to ski Canada, JH, Targhee, Big Mt. etc. etc. Going to go do it before the years say I can't. Sorry if windy just felt sort of nostalgic. Off the bed gotta ski tommorrow. Pete
Excellent. Now here's a guy I think I could enjoy shootin' the bull with on a few chairlift rides. He might ski me into the ground when we got off the lift though.
post #104 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj
Excellent. Now here's a guy I think I could enjoy shootin' the bull with on a few chairlift rides. He might ski me into the ground when we got off the lift though.
hear here
post #105 of 106
Regarding my bump skiing, I seemed to have been at my best back in 1984/85 when I was 22~23 yo. Maybe it was simply bravo meaning that I didn't have any fear of breaking bones as I do now but I'm only 80% of what I used to be able to accomplish in moguls.
post #106 of 106

Not As Strong, But Much Faster

I learned to ski relatively late in life. After almost 20 years, I may not last as long on the slopes but my technique is much better than any other period and so I believe is the quality of the experience.

Sunday's race - win in class!
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