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When is your Skiing Prime? - Page 2

post #31 of 106
I hate to admit it, but I was a better skier in my late 30's (I'm 47). The biz keeps me away from the mountian and I spend more time at my desk, 25 additional pounds doesn't help situation either. When I do get out skiing I think I enjoy more however than I did 8 years ago when I would spend 60 - 80 days a year on the slopes. These days it seems more "special" to be on the hill.

I used to ski with my girlfriends father, he was 68 and would spend most of the day skiing the bumps on Whistler bowl, in mid April after skiing he would play a round of golf...what an inspiration for me!
post #32 of 106
Sphinx15: Not only can the 86 year old Obermeyer rip with the young guns – in the film he is in the terrain park with kids throwing off-axis 360’s off of some damn big jumps.

Do you believe everything they show you in a film? You cannot possibly be naive enough to think Obermeyer did that jump.

As for peaking physically in your your 40s, I don't buy it for a second. All you have to do is look at world competitions or Olympics. If you are talking about peak performance you have to search far and wide to find it after 40.

I have been an athlete all my life and competed in track & field (sprints) and later in bodybuilding. The decline in testosterone (resulting in loss of strength and stamina) as I get older is beyond obvious. So physically, I am far from my peak. BTW, last year I ran a marathon and completed some killer trail runs, so I am not in bad shape. But compared to my 20s, I am way off.

But I started skiing at 29 and now, at 43, I am still improving. I suspect that I have yet to reach my "skiing prime", but only because I started late and started from zero skiing skills.
post #33 of 106
Story: One time in the late 80's, was skiing at Deer Valley, realized Stein Erikson was with a group of guys at the lip of a black bump run in front of us. He must have been pushing 60 then. Tan, weathered, lean and broad shouldered. So we said, hey, let's follow Stein down and then smoke him midway. Bragging rights, y'see; show these old farts who should have the best lines. We were decent skiers, level 8's, in our 20's.

So Stein and his buddies take off, we follow about 20 yards back. Or at least it started as 20 yards. He's in this one piece blue outfit, silver-blonde mane flowing, talking to his buds, laughing as he skis, and he's just floating down, no upper body movement, calm arms, feet just banking here and there, making it all look like water flowing. He's not even looking down the fall line very often.

We, on the other hand, are working freaky hard and losing ground. Hmmm. I decide no old fart is going to beat me down a serious bump field. So I begin to just run it, body flying all directions now, outta control, jouncing down the fall line. Umph-umph-ouch! Start to catch up, very slowly.

And then I guess Stein decides he's had enough chit chat, and he gets (slightly) more serious. Foot speed and knee movement increase, still flowing like water, but now right down the zipper, pumpita-pumpita-pumpita. Last thing I see before I crash and eject into a nice face plant is Stein making a big arc at the bottom, waiting for his friends. Never noticed us.

We stopped talking about old farts taking up the slopes after that...
post #34 of 106
Thanks for the correction on Obermeyer. Original post had me thinking of this 100 yr old waterski guy: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/ESPNSports/story?id=1329254
This 2005 video is pretty tame, earlier in his nineties he was skiing barefoot and doing spins and other tricks.
post #35 of 106
Thread Starter 
Beyond: That's priceless! A great tale and well-written.

For 50 years, people have wanted to: "Ski like Stein".

Of course, he is a former champion (Olympics, everything), gymnast and natural athlete who skies 100+ days per year - every year.

Still, it shows what's possible.
post #36 of 106
This post makes one of the babies of epic very happy in the fact that alot of you guys are over twice(some triple my age, and still out there getting it done. It truly is something to look forward too.
post #37 of 106
My skiing has gone downhill (there's a pun in there somewhere) for the past 4 years. The fact that I have a 4 year old daughter has something to do with it. It sucks that I can't ski as much because the equipment has gotten so much better that should be skiing a lot better. Maybe in 5-10 years from now, when I'm back to at least 30 days/yr, I'll be skiing better than ever. For now, I'm just trying to tread water and not let my skills deteriorate too much.
post #38 of 106
I plan to peak at 65.
post #39 of 106
I'm 51 , and been skiing for 42 years. Workout year round , with more emphasis on crdio last couple of years than weights. I believe the new gear has made such a giant impact on how well you can ski and how effortless skiing is compared to maybe 20 years ago or longer. My personal fitness check is being able to ski top to botom on our short hill without being out of breath, and when skiing out west being able to go for 6 hours .

I hope I can maintain my energy and strength levels for the forseeable future.
post #40 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
My skiing has gone downhill (there's a pun in there somewhere) for the past 4 years. The fact that I have a 4 year old daughter has something to do with it. It sucks that I can't ski as much because the equipment has gotten so much better that should be skiing a lot better. Maybe in 5-10 years from now, when I'm back to at least 30 days/yr, I'll be skiing better than ever. For now, I'm just trying to tread water and not let my skills deteriorate too much.
JohnH, I am of the opinion that if you are skiing with your kids, you are in the prime of your skiing life right now. Don't let yourself get caught up in worrying about your skiing, and miss the beauty of your daughter learning to love something that you can do together for years to come. Soon enough you will be back pushing your limits just trying to keep up with her.
post #41 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
If it's really tougher to get any better, technically, then I hope to see you in the olympics.
you can always improve technique. when you hit the point where you can't improve, i assume you'll either be supreme universal champion, or dead.
I just see it is tough to get much better compared to when you first start. When someone first starts skiing, they get better exponentially. As you get better and better, it takes more and more time to really get any "better". What is "better" anyway, for the average skier (i.e. non- racer who doesnt have the olympics to train for)? You link turns more efficiently, and after many days on the slopes, the turns are second nature in varying terrain and conditions. Then what? If Im not a racer, am I then a supreme universal champion? Champion of what? I didnt say impossible, I just mean it takes a lot more to get "better" as you become better. I think the prime is just when youve gotten as good technically/physically as you ever will before the body starts the decline, whether that be at 28 or 88.

Side note- I agree that the skiing prime would be out there with your kids and/or wife and/or friends on a great ski trip...to Wachusett or Alta or wherever.
post #42 of 106
I'm going to be 50 this year. I started skiing when I was 6.
I think my true prime was from about 28-38. The biggest thing you lose is athletisim. We still have some at 50 but it is no where near what is was.
Can I still ski now what I could then,yes. New equipment ,better tecnique.etc. But you lose things like foot speed,reaction time and suppleness, oh to be 28 again.
Another thing as we age is taking the time to get a proper workout. The older we get the more it takes to keep the edge or whats left of that edge.
We settle into our comfortable workout routines thinking were getting into great shape. Problem is that after 40 muscle deteriorates faster than it did when we are younger. Take 2 people ,one 25 & one 48 both in shape.Have them do nothing for 1 week it won't effect the young guy but the 48 year old will lose significant strength.
It sucks getting old but it sure beats the alternitive.

And JohnH enjoy that time with your kids it's over in a blink.
post #43 of 106
[quote=vlad]
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis
I'm going to be 50 this year. I started skiing when I was 6.
I think my true prime was from about 28-38. The biggest thing you lose is athletisim. quote]

whaddaya mean "you", there, paleface?
My athleticism remains intact....
There is no way an athelete is the same at 50 as they were at 28.
Are we still "athletic" yes but it ain't the same.
post #44 of 106
I started reading ESA forums this season and have found all the gear reviews and technique discussions thoroughly useful. I've learned a ton and greatly appreciate all the information avalable here. It's nice to see such a lively and passionate forum and I'm hoping to be a part of it for a long time.

I thought I'd introduce myself. My parents threw me on cross country skis in Oregon when I was 4, but before this ski season I had only skied alpine exactly 8 times. My dad was brought up skiing around the world with his family; he has pictures of them in aspen and the alps in the 1950's, but he hasn't skied alpine since those few trips when I was a little kid. We weren't very well off when I was little, and renting equipment for the family and buying lift tickets was a really big deal. Heck, we didn't even have a color tv until about 1982. I do remember loving alpine skiing, and the smell of the rental shop, and getting my feet measured each time, but we really couldn't make it happen as a regular family activity. Now that I'm on my own and financially stable, it's going to be one of the mainstays of winter for me and my (optimistically speaking) future family.

Anyway, this "prime" discussion is particularly interesting and close to me right now. I think my dad could love skiing just as much - or more - and be just as good - or better - than he ever was. The interest is certainly there, and with me pushing 30 days this year he definitely has the vicarious thrill that I'm sending over the phone when we talk. And even though he's scheduled for ACL / meniscus surgery soon (yeah, I don't get into the details of that with him) , he's still mentioning dragging out his old gear (205's and blow-in foam "custom" [foot vice?] boots) and spending a day at good old Hoodoo in Oregon. I bet with one day on new demo gear after his surgery he'd be back to where he was 30 years ago, but with an entirely different perspective. And I bet that entirely different perspective would get him pretty far in the realm of happiness and enjoyment of the sport. I don't think he'd care where he was in his proverbial "peak" as long as he was having fun being active and enjoying the scenery and company. And unless you're sponsored and in it for money, why should it even matter?
post #45 of 106
Vlad, Something happens to most people as they get older. Risk behavior diminishes. It is harder for me to mentally overcome a scary drop or line. So many of my friends are so resigned to a refusal to risk injury, they are no longer fun skiing companions. At the same time, Its tough to roll with the 27 year olds who have a much lower risk threshold than I ever recall having.

By being aware of the problem, I have pushed myself to bigger challenges over the past couple years. It will be interesting to see where this leads. Hopefully not to a sled ride.
post #46 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by trouble
he's still mentioning dragging out his old gear (205's and blow-in foam "custom" [foot vice?] boots) and spending a day at good old Hoodoo in Oregon. I bet with one day on new demo gear after his surgery he'd be back to where he was 30 years ago, but with an entirely different perspective. And I bet that entirely different perspective would get him pretty far in the realm of happiness and enjoyment of the sport.
I agree with you completely. But burn the 205s as a sacrafice to Ullr and be sure he gets out on some new, much shorter, demo gear.
post #47 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I agree with you completely. But burn the 205s as a sacrafice to Ullr and be sure he gets out on some new, much shorter, demo gear.
No kidding. Note my mention of "new demo gear". He's heard of these "parabolic" skis and thinks it's a pretty good idea! And with these new fangled bindings now with all that brilliant "releasable" technology, he wouldn't have to hassle with the leather strap race bindings of death like he had in college!

He doesn't know it yet, but there's a plan to get him out, possibly here to Colorado - but no way his old skis will ever slide again, except for maybe into the local dump!
post #48 of 106
At 21 skied poorly and get as much air as I could.

At 53 I still ski poorly and fold on the smallest landing.

More fun than ever though

Oh a more serious question. Can we who choose to not eat protien rich foods like dead animals ever hope to maintain any sort of active life style?

Taking up recreational soccer at age 50, I just don't want to be the only "cone" on the pitch.

:-)
post #49 of 106
I'm 50, and been skiing for 35 years. I feel I ski today as well as I ever have. New equipment and technique are a big factor. While I still like to rip it up, endurance and recovery is not what it once was, in spite of a workout routine. Or, is it that I am no longer interested in maximum vertical in a day? I am likely to savor the the whole experience more at this stage of my life.
post #50 of 106
I have learned a lot from this thread. I feel much hope hearing from people older than I am, with their wisdom. Thank you. I am 44 years old, feeling like 21! I've stopped skiing for the last 17 years or so, for many reasons..one being financial, and the other being my clinical depression.

I started skiing again this year. I'm not better off financially, but I just made an effort to be active again. The passion for skiing has made me skiing one day at a time. I've remembered that I am the happiest when I'm skiing!! I've never been so much into skiing as this year. I need some work with making my body more athletic, and losing some weight, so that I'm not dragging that extra weight when I'm skiing.

I think I'm working towards my "prime" .
post #51 of 106
I think I'm at my peak right now. I've done stuff this year that I have never done in all my 32 years of skiing. A lot of it has to do with the skis today. I have so much more confidence now than I did even just 5 years ago when I was just discovering shaped skis. I like going into the backcountry and skiing big lines and skiing down steep chutes that I probably would not have done on the skinny skis. My economic situation has improved to allow me to ski more days than when I was younger too. So I hope to at least maintain if not continue to improve my peak years when it comes to skiing.
post #52 of 106

great threat capt

Tomorrow

Seriously.

New technology, focused on the technique needed to master it, I ski better than I ever have every time out. I have been skiing a very long time too. Thanks to Volkl, Tecnica....

and huge thanks to my many friends on epicski!
post #53 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
not a opinion. skiing is largely anaerobic, and strength is a more important factor than endurance or muscular speed, in skiiing. skill is a different story, and doesn't apply against any of these three elements.
skill is a requirement aof all sports, whether strength sports or speed sports, or endurance sports.
There is both aerobic and anaerobic endurance. I think most people talk and think about endurance in relationship to their skiing more so than strength. Whether it's opinion or interpretation of language I don't agree with your point of view about strength. For the most part as skiing skill increases the requirement for strength decreases. I am excluding here the strength required to hold a GS turn or pull a divergent ski together upon landing a 30 foot huck.

On the other hand, arguing against myself, I think that core strength is a very important consideration.
post #54 of 106
I'm 53 and ski just as well, if not better, than I did in 1975. The key is to stay thin, active, and workout. I do an hour and one-half on my Lifecycle and Stairmaster at least 6 days a week when not skiing. Then I drink a couple of dark beers. That does the trick.
post #55 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB
I'm 53 and ski just as well, if not better, than I did in 1975. The key is to stay thin, active, and workout. I do an hour and one-half on my Lifecycle and Stairmaster at least 6 days a week when not skiing. Then I drink a couple of dark beers. That does the trick.
Wow! You excersise a lot!! Me, no..that's probably why I have gained some 20 pounds . So, tell me, MJB, do you have any dietary restrictions?
post #56 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
start taking vit. C with meals. 500-1000 mg, "sandwiched" into the middle of each meal, NOT "time-release", either. eat many small meals with the "C" sandwiched in, every day.
Your recovery time will decrease, exceptionally.
I gotta call you on this one Vlad. Can you cite a scientific study that links vitamin C overload to recover time?
post #57 of 106
I will be 54 this month. Skied since 1972. Every year I get better,thanks to the new gear, determination, 60 days a year, plus summer ski. I am thankful for every turn I make.
post #58 of 106
I've only been skiing for 10 years now, so I don't know when I might peak. I do get better and better though but work is taking up too much time and I can't work out as much or at all as I used too. This is having a very negative effect on me. The grind is starting to grind me up. I wonder if there is a big difference between those of us who live, work, and ski in the northeast, especialy NY and those that live out west. At 40 I think it's time for a change. I want to be the 70 year old guy flying down the mountain.
post #59 of 106

whtmt

I think the term prime is a moving target for a variety of things. I know that, for myself, my prime in reaction time, reflex movements, and eye /hand coordination is definately not as good as it once was. However, my technical ability has continued to improve even beyond 50. For instance I'm in recovery for an ACL injury last March 30th, 2005. To rebuild balance, strength, endurance, and reflexes I have developed some workouts on the BOSU, along with spinning and other strength exercises that my PT team and surgeon prescribed.

In particular I bounce on the BOSU moving my legs from side to side like a bump skier. I also do front to back scissor bounces for reaction and reflex development. Most recently I have set a pair of ski poles across my wrists while I continue bouncing. I watch myself in a tall mirror to see the relationship of my upper body to my lower body during the movements, with a view toward keeping the upper body completely quiet. Then I add some 90 degree and 180 degree turns in the routine while I'm still bouncing. This adds a bump run type dimension to the workout.

Last weekend I skied my sixth day on a variety of conditions here in NH and one of my instructor friends couldn't believe how good my timing and technique was with only that many days on two legs again.

What I have discovered is that prime may be many things to many people at different times in their lives. For me, I have a long history of in-line skating up until ski season and this past late summer through the fall I had spent alot of time on the BOSU for a dynamic balance workout. By the way, for those who are not familiar with the BOSU, it looks like a Swiss Ball cut in half with a hard disc on one side and the soft dome of rubber on the other. BOSU stands for Both Sides Up. You can do workouts with it in either position. I do single leg squats on it standing on the hard disc side because I can do sets of 20 to 90 degrees and that's what my PT team wanted to see.

So, my point is that even when your reflexes and endurance continue to become weaker from when you were a twenty something, that doesn't mean that your technical abiltiy will also have to become less then it once was. I just cross train with more emphasis on building on what I already have, but with a clear focus toward ski technique. Best of luck and don't look back.

whtmt & Mackenzie 911
post #60 of 106
When I was 19 to 20 years old.

I will never be able to ski like that again. But I try.
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