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skiing switch

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I have hung around here for awhile and I see that a lot of people talk about expert skiing, technique and maneuvers.

If you're an expert and going to have fun (like hucking a cornice or throwing a grab) do you need to know how to ski switch?

BTW I am not talking park or stunt ditch.
post #2 of 19
Dear Miss,

No, but if you're an expert and you ski switch, you will have fun.
post #3 of 19
Yes. Just as much as moguls, pow, gates.....

With out geting into the semantics of what an expert is. Having all these skills is a sign of being one.
post #4 of 19
Hucking cliffs, and playing in the park are just two activities you can pursue on skis. Switch skiing is a third. Doing all three does not make you an expert any more than skiiing a black or double black run.
It's how you do it that defines "expert".
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Ok, so if you're going to ski switch do you always need twin tips? I could see myself on the Miss Demeanor!
post #6 of 19
Not always.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Beehaven
...do you need to know how to ski switch?...
Are you an instructor? Then the answer is yes. No? then only if you want to.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Beehaven
Ok, so if you're going to ski switch do you always need twin tips?
hi, first time poster, long time reader!! anyway, no, you don't need twin tips. mine aren't twins but i love switch skiing!

actually, i ski switch >50% of the time if i'm on a groomer b/c it's great for balance and edge awareness...and it's just plain fun! to swap back and forth quickly between switch and regular, you have to be centered and be able to achieve a flat ski, both of which are paramount for bump skiing (my passion).
post #9 of 19
As someone who used to ski switch on the ole straight ski with no upturned tail, I do not reccomend skiing switch without some degree of upturned tail.

Why? Cause it really really hurts when the back of the ski digs in and sends you backwards at a fast rate landing on the back of your head. Simple enough !

Can you do it? Yes you can. Still don't reccomend it.

Skiing backwards takes time to get accustomed to. During this learning process you will surely dig in the tails if they are not upturned.

Keeping a flat ski and staying balanced is one thing going straight. making paralell turns switch is something else and as you learn how to do it you will screw up and lean backwards. Again with a non upturned tail WHAMOO !

Jumping forget it unless you have a death wish. Just buy twin tips or a ski with up turned tail, save your self the hospital bills.

Go to a store that sells used equipment and buy the junkiest cheapest twin tip you can find to learn on, then decide if you really want twin tips.

There are many many many great skis out there that are not park specific with up turned tails. Hmm lets say the 8800
post #10 of 19
miss bee,

A true "expert" skiier can ski forward, backward, sideways on the inside and outside ski, in balance on most terrain.

Like justanotherskipro said,
Quote:
Hucking cliffs, and playing in the park are just two activities you can pursue on skis. Switch skiing is a third. Doing all three does not make you an expert any more than skiiing a black or double black run.
It's how you do it that defines "expert".
A true expert skiier is an expert by mastering these things on all kinds of snow and on all terrain.

So, to answer your Q,
Quote:
If you're an expert and going to have fun (like hucking a cornice or throwing a grab) do you need to know how to ski switch?
Yes.

RW

PS: many modern skis (not all) have enough of an upturned tail to ski switch, but twin tips are safer for switch in the bumps.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
As someone who used to ski switch on the ole straight ski with no upturned tail, I do not reccomend skiing switch without some degree of upturned tail.

Why? Cause it really really hurts when the back of the ski digs in and sends you backwards at a fast rate landing on the back of your head. Simple enough !
my skis have only the slightest upturn but i've never once had the tails dig in *knock on wood*. switch parallel turns and even landing switch off of jumps have not been a problem. ymmv.
post #12 of 19
Riding switch is riding with your un-natural foot forward. 'Switching' from right foot forward to left foot forward, etc. Skiing backwards is just skiing backwards, there's no 'switch'.

It's not a bad skill to work on and can make 'easy' trails more entertaining. Heck, anything that makes you have fun on the hill is good to work on!


I understand that 'switch' is the accepted term park skiers use to describe skiing backwards. That doesn't make it correct, just wanted to point that out.
post #13 of 19
Do you prefer fakie then Whiteroom?

Skiing switch on groomers aint that hard or challening, the cool stuff is to ride big open pow-areas fakie/switch... Can wait until I can get a long, good switch-run with my Scratch BC!

The only thing that i don't like about backwardskiing is that i tend to be very tense and i get a really bad feeling in my hip, hurts like hell to be honest! (only appears when i ski for a long time, like a minute and more..) Any1 know what I'm doing wrong, and have some good advices?
post #14 of 19
Yeah 'Fakie' works. So does 'Backwards'. I really don't have any personal stake in what anyone calls it, just wanted to point out that it's not 'switch'.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom
Yeah 'Fakie' works. So does 'Backwards'. I really don't have any personal stake in what anyone calls it, just wanted to point out that it's not 'switch'.
excellent point.
incidentally, skiing backward (anyone else remember the old '70s freestyle term?) is much less painful with the boots unbuckeld, at least slightly...
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Hucking cliffs, and playing in the park are just two activities you can pursue on skis. Switch skiing is a third. ...
My son resembles that comment! Hucks cliffs (he's good at that) playing in the park (he's just fair to mediocre at that) and skiing switch. The fun part is watching him try to ski switch in deep fresh powder. He even tries it on back country runs after we've worked very hard (or at least I have) skinning up. Doesn't bother him to "use up" a fresh deep powder face working on his switch powder skills. I must say, that falls in powder while skiing switch at reasonable speed can be very entertaining to watch.
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
I was having this conversation with someone the other day and they warned me that skiing backwards is a very good way to blow out a knee. Any thoughts?

~missy
post #18 of 19

Don't worry 'bout it

Backward twisting falls are one of the most common mechanisms of action for tearing and ACL. So if you feel that you are more inclined to twist and fall backward when skiing switch, then maybe you are more prone to damage your ACL. I wouldn't let this stop you from skiing switch though, people do it all the time without getting hurt. If you are going to practice and get good, consider riding a binding that has a diagonal heel release (like an look pivot heel from a season or more ago, or a current model tyrolia).
post #19 of 19
Skiing in general is a very good way to blow out a knee.
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