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Skiing Hunched over - Page 3

post #61 of 79
vera ... as alwasys you're a clever and well-spoken ski goddess.
post #62 of 79
He reminds me of SCSA.

Get rid of his poles. He'll ski more naturally, and the return of the poles can be a reward for skiing 6 foot tall.
post #63 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by vera
de-emphasize the color runs you guys do (blues should be the hardest). Maybe do one hard one, every three days just because he will probably ask you. Get him to skate a lot more with you (race!) to help him move forward naturally. He already knows how from rollerblading, and also knows that if he gets in the backseat on his blades, he will fall on his butt.
You're a newer skier, Skilife. Tell him an instructor advised you to practice where it's easiest for you and that's why you're avoiding the steeper stuff temporarily. So you can get better. He'll want to too.

Regarding the boots. Check around at ski shops. Many offer the type of program where you purchase children's gear new once and then get the full amount you paid as trade-in value when you upgrade repeatedly as they grow. So your kid's outfit costs $300 the first year and $50 a year each subsequent season--until he gets into racing or something and you need to buy two or three sets of skis.
post #64 of 79
Thread Starter 
Thank you all. Yes, the most important thing is to have fun. I will do the private lesson with him. But as someone said, he would like to ski with more kids so I won't make the lesson too long so he doesn't get bored.

And I will try to get more videos of him and post that.

And now, just for fun take a look at http://ski.topeverything.com/Default...wcontent&ID=30

Would you believe me that I was jumping over this guy when I took the photo? OK, I thought not.
post #65 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vera
2) A 9 year old boy in his second year of skiing, even if he is skiing 3x a week, should NOT be skiing double blacks unless he has Hermann Maier's genetics. The mechanics he shows in his turns, his size and how he carries his poles all indicate he has been taken on the wrong terrain consistently either by you and/or his instructors. Even if he shows absolutely no fear.
Vera, I agree with a lot that you said, and as far as the double black, even his last instructor, who's been teaching for 40 years, said that they don't learn much technique on the double blacks at this age, but the reason he takes them there every once in a while is for the fun of it. As many of you have said, skiing is about fun, especially at this age. Of course as long as they can safely ski the double blacks.

The other thing I have to say, I've said this before in a different post, is not the number of years skiing, but what you do with that. There are kids in his class that have been skiing since they were 4 years old (5-6 years skiing) but have skied a lot less in their lives than my son has skied in his 2 seasons of skiing. And as another instructor told me, the best way to improve is to come often any time you can come 3 days in a week, you will improve more than coming the same amount of times in 3 weeks. I believe that to be true.
post #66 of 79
Thread Starter 
Thank you DC and all who made me bring the boots down and have them looked at again by Larry (that's Larry's Boot Fitting in Boulder). The problem with the boots was not too big feet size, but there was too much room in the cuff. Larry put enough padding there that hopefully that will make a huge difference. Larry also saw the video and concurred with you guys.

Yesterday when we went skiing I looked for that wedge turn but it wasn't there. The one in the video was probably "one of those things" because most of the time he makes very good turns. Here is a picture of his tracks going down a black. http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=71

I'm no expert, but... I know the tracks are not 100% perfect, but if you ask me the skis were on edge. And that's what I saw most of the day yesterday. The only time he skid was when it was steeper and icy. And I'm OK with that.

Again thank you all.
post #67 of 79

great tracks

Great tracks! I'm looking forward to seeing more photos as he grows and gets even better. You are right in that time to practice is everything...for kids and for us as adults!
Do you guys ski at Eldora? Where?
post #68 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vera
Great tracks! I'm looking forward to seeing more photos as he grows and gets even better. You are right in that time to practice is everything...for kids and for us as adults!
Do you guys ski at Eldora? Where?
Thanks Vera. Yes practice is everything (well you know what I mean). Yes our home turf is Eldora b/c we can get there so quickly we can even go 1 afternoon during the week when I can take him out early. Tomorrow we're going to Winter Park though.

Where are you?
post #69 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilife
Thank you DC and all who made me bring the boots down and have them looked at again by Larry (that's Larry's Boot Fitting in Boulder). The problem with the boots was not too big feet size, but there was too much room in the cuff. Larry put enough padding there that hopefully that will make a huge difference. Larry also saw the video and concurred with you guys.

Yesterday when we went skiing I looked for that wedge turn but it wasn't there. The one in the video was probably "one of those things" because most of the time he makes very good turns. Here is a picture of his tracks going down a black. http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=71

I'm no expert, but... I know the tracks are not 100% perfect, but if you ask me the skis were on edge. And that's what I saw most of the day yesterday. The only time he skid was when it was steeper and icy. And I'm OK with that.

Again thank you all.

Skilife, I have read all of this thread to see if anyone finally got to what I was going to suggest: small calves. Glad that Larry did and I am glad that the shims solve the problem. Those tracks say everything. I believe that instructors should be better trained in spotting these problems. If someone is leaning forward at the waist, there is usually a good reason. They need to for balance. I have very skinny ankles and calves and it drove me crazy (as an adult) trying to get balanced. I have shims behind the liners of my new Langes, which already have a lot of forward lean.

I have a 16 year old who skis in size nine Lang Comp100's with the bolts in the back removed to make them more flexible. He skied them quite well last year, but was a little bent over at the waist. This year he is upright in the same boot. Why: his calf has filled out and now he has more forward lean in the boot. He can also flex it better, but the forward lean was a big factor too.

Glad you found the answer. I am a big believer in the magic that aligment can do and canted the bindings on both of my sons skis when they got their first adult boots. It made a huge difference. LewBob
post #70 of 79
skilife, I'm at Vail.
Used to work at Winter Park for 11 seasons. Great ski school, great kids school. Cool terrain park and tree trails!
Have lots of fun!
post #71 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
....small calves. Glad that Larry did and I am glad that the shims solve the problem. ... I believe that instructors should be better trained in spotting these problems.
Thanks LewBob, His instructor did suggest that the boots be checked. After that Larry put some lifts on the heels. The instructor next week noticed a big difference in my son's skiing, but there was still obviously something wrong. Larry this time put the shims to fix it. Larry is a conservative fitter, especially with children. I believe that's why he only did the heels the first time around. My fault for not paying closer attention and bringing my son back to Larry sooner.
post #72 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilife
My fault for not paying closer attention and bringing my son back to Larry sooner.
It's all a learning experience!
post #73 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vera
It's all a learning experience!
Yes, it is vera. Well we had a blast at Mary Jane today. No technique teaching or anything. Just fun. It was a glorious day. Here are some photos.

http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=76
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=77
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=78
http://ski.topeverything.com/default...wcontent&ID=79
post #74 of 79

nice

These are great photos!

I taught at Winter Park for 11 years and lived there for 20.

They have some great technical kids' instructors. If you should wish to take your son for a private lesson there, I would be happy to hook you up with some good ones.
post #75 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vera
...I would be happy to hook you up with some good ones.
Thanks vera, I will let you know. Not sure right now when we're going back. But it will probably be in April sometime.
post #76 of 79
I see a lot of experts hashing the poor kid's style.
his frame is in a dynamic stage of development, AND he's NOT hunching too badly.
bear in mind, ye cookie-cutting experts, that the proportionate length between his torso and his legs is bouncing back and forth at his age, and so will his stance.
stop over-analyzing these formative skeletons, and stop suggesting better instructors.
do him a HUGE solid:
just let him ski, and leave his style alone, until his ephyseal closures have sealed, OK?
give him a few years of playing, and come up with exercises to challenge him, NOT new instructors, etc.
Geeziz H. christ-
some experts could F*#&@ up a free lunch, waiting for change.
His form looks fine.
leave him the hell alone and go grab a beer.
post #77 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
I see a lot of experts hashing the poor kid's style.
his frame is in a dynamic stage of development, AND he's NOT hunching too badly.
bear in mind, ye cookie-cutting experts, that the proportionate length between his torso and his legs is bouncing back and forth at his age, and so will his stance.
stop over-analyzing these formative skeletons, and stop suggesting better instructors.
do him a HUGE solid:
just let him ski, and leave his style alone, until his ephyseal closures have sealed, OK?
give him a few years of playing, and come up with exercises to challenge him, NOT new instructors, etc.
Geeziz H. christ-
some experts could F*#&@ up a free lunch, waiting for change.
His form looks fine.
leave him the hell alone and go grab a beer.
Vlad, that's why yesterday at Mary Jane it was all about fun. He kept asking me... "are you having fun..." When we got home he was beaming with delight, he had such a good day. I took a video of him and when he and I looked at it, it was all about "wow, that was cool how you did that" type of thing. Basically emphasizing the fun part of it and reinforcing the fact that he loves skiing. However, out of all these, we did discover that the boots were too big on the cuffs. He was happy to get that fixed since in his mind I think he knows it would help. And he already made me promise that I take him to Larry first thing next year after we get him his boots for the next season.
post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilife
Vlad, that's why yesterday at Mary Jane it was all about fun. He kept asking me... "are you having fun..." When we got home he was beaming with delight, he had such a good day. I took a video of him and when he and I looked at it, it was all about "wow, that was cool how you did that" type of thing. Basically emphasizing the fun part of it and reinforcing the fact that he loves skiing. However, out of all these, we did discover that the boots were too big on the cuffs. He was happy to get that fixed since in his mind I think he knows it would help. And he already made me promise that I take him to Larry first thing next year after we get him his boots for the next season.
absolutely- my own hat's off, as well, to the bears who pointe dout that his boots are too big, and along with these bears, I'm sure his young 'center' will be 'hunting' so much, now, and he'll feel freer to stand tall.
i would be full of scheisse were I to poin t out even one bad piece of advice in this thread, and, mor eimportantly, who th' helam I to do that, anyway.
I've learned that kids outgrow so many things in their skiing, at their own speed.
that ol' concept of guided discovery is especially germaine with regard to our younger 'cubs'.
post #79 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
I see a lot of experts hashing the poor kid's style.
his frame is in a dynamic stage of development, AND he's NOT hunching too badly.
bear in mind, ye cookie-cutting experts, that the proportionate length between his torso and his legs is bouncing back and forth at his age, and so will his stance.
stop over-analyzing these formative skeletons, and stop suggesting better instructors.
do him a HUGE solid:
just let him ski, and leave his style alone, until his ephyseal closures have sealed, OK?
give him a few years of playing, and come up with exercises to challenge him, NOT new instructors, etc.
Geeziz H. christ-
some experts could F*#&@ up a free lunch, waiting for change.
His form looks fine.
leave him the hell alone and go grab a beer.
You know he is doing well and having fun. He does not need to strive for perfection. It's more important that he be in it for the long haul and that it be fun. Let him ski!
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