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grass skiing, street skiing, etc...

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Looking for things to do during the summer...

Just curious if any of you have tried street skiing, grass skiing, etc., and if so, if you have any equipment manufacturers that you like/find interesting.

...because road rash is just as nice as ice burns...

thanks!
post #2 of 17
I've always wanted to try skiing on a sand pit but have never had a pair of skis I would willingly trash. I think I even saw a slalom course set on a sand pit in a warren miller movie once.
post #3 of 17
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
i also found these, if anyone's interested:

http://www.streetski.com/
post #5 of 17
Those terrablades look really really clunky and about as responsive as a 2x4. Either that or the guy using them doesn't know what he's doing. It looks like the harb carvers are a bit more realistic as far as tipping them on "edge" to turn but with only two wheels on the ground during a turn I don't see how they would respond much like a ski.

It doesn't look like many of these products do a very good job of reproducing the fore/aft flexibility of skis and the continuous edge contact you get between ski and snow throughout various stages of a turn. I know rockered inline skates are used to mimic the turning behavior of hockey ice skates but since the wheels/blade are in a rigid position it is all or nothing - not quite like skis. You have two wheels on the ground when upright, and at a certain angle you get contact from the other two.

The street skis look like they can do an okay job at reproducing the camber and response of a ski.
post #6 of 17

Buy a sportbike! Plenty of ripping to be had!

Sounds like someone here needs a crotch rocket! LOL

In all seriousness though, I rollerblade in the off months, if you can peel me off my Ninja, that is!

I'm not sure I could justify buying any of these other products at the prices listed when the blades seem to do just fine... even if they aren't perfect, or recreate the feeling in an exact manner...
post #7 of 17
I like the street ski the best but I think the terraski would be more useable as there usually isn't cars on grassy hills.

All I can think of is Ewww stinky ski boots.

something inbetween would be nice. Not so street specific but not 2 feet in the air like the terraski's
post #8 of 17

Grass skis v. MTB

I had grass skis back in the late '70's and had a lot of fun with them (for about 10 minutes about 5-10 times), but I just ride my MTB like this when I want a GS run: 1) ride 1.5 miles to foot of Mt. Tam; 2) climb 2250' fire road up; and 3) take 2250' fire road back down.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbubnis
I've always wanted to try skiing on a sand pit but have never had a pair of skis I would willingly trash. I think I even saw a slalom course set on a sand pit in a warren miller movie once.
http://www.telemarktalk.com/phpBB/vi...ho+sand+skiing

xposted from TTips - not all ski trips west are made in the winter. Get 'er done. Find some rental store in the midwest that is unloading some Pre's or Olins and you're set.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnstormer View Post
Those terrablades look really really clunky and about as responsive as a 2x4. Either that or the guy using them doesn't know what he's doing. It looks like the harb carvers are a bit more realistic as far as tipping them on "edge" to turn but with only two wheels on the ground during a turn I don't see how they would respond much like a ski.

It doesn't look like many of these products do a very good job of reproducing the fore/aft flexibility of skis and the continuous edge contact you get between ski and snow throughout various stages of a turn. I know rockered inline skates are used to mimic the turning behavior of hockey ice skates but since the wheels/blade are in a rigid position it is all or nothing - not quite like skis. You have two wheels on the ground when upright, and at a certain angle you get contact from the other two.

The street skis look like they can do an okay job at reproducing the camber and response of a ski.

Hi am the maker of the Terrablades. I am curious to know why you thought the skates are not maneuverable. Did you see the videos? Its an off-road vehicle basically so its not something to be ducking gates on a paved road at 40mph.

But at the same time the large air filled tires completely insulate you from bumps in the road and smooth the ride to a velvet feel. No chatter. Rollerblades for example like to chatter wildly on rough pavement. These just keep cruising.

We use kites, and motorized pusher, ski lifts, no intention of skating without some form of gravity, wind or motor with these. A great workout, great way to get those ski legs like iron.

The skater there is either me or Charles Sinek an Olympic figure skater. We are moving along pretty fast in most of the video over 20mph on average even on rocky broken up fire roads that would bury Coyotes. They turn about the same as grass skis. Grass skis don’t slide, they carve. Both have same length. If you like grass skiing than Terrablading would be about the same experience. Grass skis are faster and edge better on grass but they only work on that one surface. Grass skis probably flex some (camber as you mentioned) but not much. Grass skiing is really really fun. Its just a shame there is only a few places to do it, and if you live on the west coast no places to do it really, unless you like golf courses and little parks.

Terrablades keep on going after the grass is gone. They are at home on the road, in dirt, you name it. and they have brakes with grass skiis never had, so you can virtually rapel over sections where you can not turn but using the 4 brakes on the center wheels which turn the skates into a long rubber suction cup, which you can stick to the trail as pretty easily as long as its not pumace or soft sand.

The power you get from the ski boots and support more than makes up for being a few inches off the ground.

They do not perform like regular skates. But they do turn pretty easily that is because the middle wheel are 1 cm lower than the end wheels.

The ski boots don’t really get that hot as another post pointed out. More really helmet, body armor stuff like that makes the heat tough if in the desert for example.

I did not design these for beginner skaters, or beginner skiers, little kids, old people etc. They are full on off road, dangerous and fun and take time to learn.

Being up high only makes falls more spectacular, we have not found stability problems. But most of the higher speed skating we have done with these has been with the powered rig or on smooth grass so I can really speak for over 40 mph since they were not really designed for it. We have jumped of some things, maybe 4ft no problem. Basically this is a test idea, so far so good. So far one trip to the hospital with a few broken ribs and punctured lung. But that’s after using them for nearly 2 years now so knock on wood we are in our 40s though so its getting tougher.

Basically it is really hard to make something that will do everything. My experience with the skates so far is its lots of gear, but you can do much more than you expected, people freak out, and its fun. The best part is blasting by people on racing bikes on the road with the rollercycle, and passing begginer mountain bikers on trails, and keeping up with kite surfers on the beach with traction kites is fun. Its just another way to get around.

Anyone want to try them in S. Ca. let me know. I should have some nicer professionally made pairs done by CNC soon.

R.
www.terrablades.com


this is one is on its way to CNC. same as what have but a bit nicer.


newest push rig planned. we have working ones that do over 30mph uphill on trails!


charles on his 4th day using them.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Hi am the maker of the Terrablades. I am curious to know why you thought the skates are not maneuverable. Did you see the videos? Its an off-road vehicle basically so its not something to be ducking gates on a paved road at 40mph.
I rewatched the 84 MB video from your site. The things certainly look enjoyable and versatile as you mentioned. I wouldn't hesitate to jump on a pair myself and bomb some hills.

My 2x4 analogy was worded a bit harshly, but even after rewatching it still doesn't look like when tipped on edge they are responsive to turning the way modern skis are. Most of the turning appears to be accomplished in a manner thats not really analagous to properly carving a ski: by pushing off the outside/downhill blade (skating).

I haven't been able to find any videos of grass skiing for comparison, but based off the few pictures I've been able to find online, it looks like grass skis (especially the ones with treads not wheels) both edge and flex more like an alpine ski. Thus I expect they would carve a bit more naturally. As you mentioned though, the grass skis are limited strictly to grass and thats it.

I don't mean to imply that all blade/skate devices NEED to replicate a carved ski turn and those which don't reproduce it aren't useful. I've been aggressive inline skating on and off for 10 years and it has improved my balance, confidence, agility, and tolerance for pain; all of which carry over into skiing. It hasn't done jack squat for my ski turning ability, though, since aggressive skates don't turn well at all.
post #13 of 17
I've always been fascinated by certain inventions, and the problem of replicating the snow skiing experience on alternative surfaces is no exception. However, when riding skis on snow, one has the advantage of sharp steel edges that actually cut into a (usually) much softer surface along an uninterrupted line.

The alternatives have to rely a lot more on friction in order to hold through a turn. My guess is observing how motorcycles perform on various surfaces, especially in acheiving angulation through the turns, is how one could guess at the performance peak of any alternative.
post #14 of 17
^^^^ what Bez says^^^^
post #15 of 17

carving on skates?

Thanks for checking out my movies!

I am not sure if I agree with the idea that skates don't carve. They don't flex like skis so I think the carve is different but take a figure skater for example they track large arcs leaning way over, look at the leg angulations the motion. Its slightly different but still the same thing really.

Also the center part of your ski will not bend. that’s where the power is the tips and tails will bend and track the ski over but you still have the middle section where the weight is. Now with parabolic skis people are tracking very differently from the old skis but if you go back in time 15 years to a more straight side cut i think your talking about apples and apples regarding skates verses skis.

A tire is very different from a runner true, but 4 tires in a line can provide contact like a runner. Thin wheels like on rollerblades tend to feel like they have an edge but they don't. The grass skis have rollers which have a serrated lip on them that mimics an edge.

You can not replicate skiing by skating. But you can build the same muscles, and improve balance, lean to stay over your tips and not slide your tails. The deep angular smear turn for example Scott Smitt made so famous that is in the videos would be pretty hard to do. But if you take a pair of rollerblades and ski poles and skate down some nice steep roads making nice turns, bouncing down, angling the down hill knee. I think you can get about 75% of the ski motion. The weight transfer is similar etc.

I lived in Japan for 3 years. My outlet was to skate down their steep mountain roads. I did not skate them fast. but I did carve turns. The difference I think was that the downhill leg was really angled out, while the uphill I think was not so much angled.

My off road skates will angle too but since your higher up and the wheel is wider you can't flex as far over. The higher the triangle the less the angle of the base legs. So if you are lifted 7 inch up, then you cant angle as far unless you can reach out wider. Hence these skates tend to have shallower turns when carving.
post #16 of 17
Don't forget about culm bank (or slag heap, or gob pile, or whatever its called) skiing.

I grew up in Northeastern Pennsylvania and this region has a long history of coal mining. One of the negative aspects of all this mining is the ugly culm banks that get built up which is basically waste rock or slate from the mines. Some of these piles would be absolute MONSTERS. They're a huge environmental problem (acid mine drainage, etc) and they're an eyesore. But to a young's skiers eyes they are a gold mine of steeps, fluted faces, rockalanches, and drops. Yes, back in when I was junior high, during the summer we went to our local ski shop and for about $10 purchased some beat up rental boots and skis and ripped the **** out of our local culm banks. We rode up to the top on our dirtbikes....kind of like snowmobile access skiing...but in the summer. On rock. In Pennsylvania.

Damn I wish I still had the pictures. But at least 15 years later, I still have the scars...

Here's some random culm bank photos I googled to give you an idea. Fluted Alaskan style faces:


Steep:


And I can't believe I was actually able to google up a photo of one of the actual culm banks we slayed. Prospect culm bank outside of Wilkes-Barre, PA. I swear TGR and MSP had heli's flying overhead as we descended filming....

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post #17 of 17

skates

i threw up a new video on youtube using the off road skates it shows how they handle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orywyJEh_Q0


R.
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