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wax on/wax off

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
it's getting close to putting my skis away (hopefully a few weeks away). does anyone store their skis for the summer with unscraped wax on--just iron it on and leave it? i never have nor has anyone mentioned they do, but it sounds like a good way to protect the base over the summer months. anyone?


thanks
post #2 of 16
I do! I use a base conditioning wax, can't recall the brand. Don't take it off till next season.
post #3 of 16
Like many things there are at least several schools of thought on the matter:
1) Apply a heavy coat of warm temp wax like Swix CH 10 or equivalent. This protects the base from dirt, dust and shrinkage and the edges from rust. Store in a cool dry place.
2) Don't wax the edges. Wax can trap moisture which will promote rust. Store in a cool, dry place.
3) Don't wax at all. It doesn't make much difference. Store in a cool dry place.

I follow approach #1 and it has worked for me.
post #4 of 16
I use method one. Even when I didn't believe in waxing that often, I waxed for the summer storage.
post #5 of 16
I use the swix base prep wax to store the skis, but have had some rust on the edges, so I agree about not waxing the edges.


I've heard it mentioned to put vaseline on the edges, but i'm not going to do that. Just gummi and file 'em if they get a little rust.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
Like many things there are at least several schools of thought on the matter:
1) Apply a heavy coat of warm temp wax like Swix CH 10 or equivalent. This protects the base from dirt, dust and shrinkage and the edges from rust. Store in a cool dry place.
2) Don't wax the edges. Wax can trap moisture which will promote rust. Store in a cool, dry place.
3) Don't wax at all. It doesn't make much difference. Store in a cool dry place.

I follow approach #1 and it has worked for me.
I'm for #1.

Number 2 seems a little suspicious. Oxygen causes rust, not moisture. That's why it's called oxidation.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
Like many things there are at least several schools of thought on the matter:
1) Apply a heavy coat of warm temp wax like Swix CH 10 or equivalent. This protects the base from dirt, dust and shrinkage and the edges from rust. Store in a cool dry place.
2) Don't wax the edges. Wax can trap moisture which will promote rust. Store in a cool, dry place.
3) Don't wax at all. It doesn't make much difference. Store in a cool dry place.

I follow approach #1 and it has worked for me.
I'm also for #1, but I'm also very lazy. I just leave them in my locker at the Mountain (inside room stays dry), or in my de-humidified basement, with absolutely no prep work, other than all my skis are within a couple of days of gotten tuned, and I've never developed rust over the summer.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisInSeattle
I'm for #1.

...Oxygen causes rust, not moisture. That's why it's called oxidation.
You are right. However, several factors promote the development of rust like moisture, a high humidity environment, certain salts and how smooth or striated or dinged up the edges are, or not and probably some other factors like air pollution. So, if you haven't completely dried your skis and cleaned your skis edges of salts from road grime or salted slopes, some argue that wax just seals in that junk along with some air and the oxygen in any water content and other water impurities, I suppose.

Similarly, dings and scratches or striations from stoneginding or filing in combination with moisture etc., can act like a petri dish for rust development so to speak. So, although I use method #1, I think that the key to storing away your skis is that the edges are clean and smooth, the skis are dry and that you store them in a cool, dry place or as close to that type of surrounding as is available to you. In high humidity environments, waxing the edges as well as the bases works well, I've found.

AS SMJ points out, you can also deal with any rust with a gummi stone the next season. However, excessive rusting can cause pitting in the ski edges which takes a lot more effort or a stonegrind to deal with.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I think #1 sounds like the way to go. i'll have the skis dry for a few days at room temp before applying wax; possibly eliminating any moisture trapped around the edges.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisInSeattle
I'm for #1.

Number 2 seems a little suspicious. Oxygen causes rust, not moisture. That's why it's called oxidation.

Yes, in this case, it is oxygen, but as lostboy said water facilitates or accelerates this process.

By the way, there are lots of oxidants that contain no oxygen.

.
post #11 of 16
I was kind of thinking about putting on a few layers of Dominator Zoom all temperature graphite, then not scraping the last layer. Do you think this is OK? or do you think I should put on a layer of warm temperature wax? If I were to do that, then, I scrape off all the all temp wax off first, right?

sorry, I'm new
post #12 of 16
Yes. It's like wearing a condom. You need protection, especially on your skis.
post #13 of 16
Just wax with any cheap wax you have available and you'll be fine. Scrape the edges if you believe in the oxydation theory.
post #14 of 16
Ok - I hear you all about not removing the wax for storage, but I supposed you still remove the wax once first (to clean the skis as usual) and then reapply, right?
post #15 of 16
I use cheap wax and hot wax 3 times to remove dirt etc. (I guess you're supposed to do it until the wax comes out white, and not grime color)

Then, I plan to put on a couple of layers of wax.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jalexc
Ok - I hear you all about not removing the wax for storage, but I supposed you still remove the wax once first (to clean the skis as usual) and then reapply, right?
at the begining of the year i'll be removing the wax and applying a couple of extra coats.
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