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Outside leg wont stop turning

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I spent about 7 hours at our local hil Friday night with 5 - 10 cm fresh during the day and again Sat morning with another 5 - 10 overnight.

Ski: 8800 in 178
Skier 5' 10" 140 LB level 7-8

I found on my last few mountain outings I kept finding my outside leg way out there and still turning yet my inside ski was transitioned and making the next turn as intended. Causing me to have to lift up that ski and bring it to the other.

I tried working on this at the local hill and found this happens more in bigger turns 20 - 25 m and when I am really trying to carve using both edges and leaving clean train tracks.

It doesn't happen all the time but is pretty annoying and caused me a few OH $Hit moments.

Any thoughts what this may be from and what to look for or do to prevent.
post #2 of 14
I'm certainly not an expert or an instructor, but would offer:

1) Too much weight on new inside ski?
2) Canting/alignment issue?

Others will offer more insightful comments.
post #3 of 14
It's possible your are over edged.

Is it one side only or both sides?

The other thing is are you "steering" both feet into the hill until you are ready to transition. Your old inside ski (the one that is transitioning too "early" you might not be active with as far as continuing to steer and edge it "up into" the hill to keep it tracking on the outside (little toe) side.

DC
post #4 of 14
It is also possible that you are a little in the backseat and your hips are too far inside at the end of the turn. You might be failing to get yourself back into neutral position (hips squarely over the skis laterally) before initiating into the new turn.

It might also be that your old-inside/new-outside leg is ready to get into the new turn, while your old-outside/new-inside leg is still trying to finish the old turn. Both halves must do this simultaneously.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
It's possible your are over edged.

Is it one side only or both sides?DC
I did notice when it happens the outside ski is very tipped to the inside, almost of feeling of it being verticle.

Oddly it is the right only, which is my stong leg.

Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
It is also possible that you are a little in the backseat and your hips are too far inside at the end of the turn. You might be failing to get yourself back into neutral position (hips squarely over the skis laterally) before initiating into the new turn.
Yup this is classic me. Perhaps too much tipping and not being downhill enough.
post #6 of 14
Also have someone check to see if you are banking into your turns.

Try and get your shoulders level, in the front seat and looking to to new turn at initiation.

Do these things and edge angle will not matter.

ed
post #7 of 14
marmot,

What you are experiencing is caused by not releasing the old outside ski before engaging the new outside ski. You must move your cm (belly button) over your old outside ski to release it, before engaging a new edge. Movements are ---diagional out of the old turn and then diagional to the inside of the new turn. The diagional movement out of the old turn releases it and diagionally into the new turn reingages your skis.

RW
post #8 of 14
I'd say that you're not following through on the weight transition that should accompany the end of one turn and the start of the next. For me, that automatically pulls the skis into the right orientation.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White
marmot,

What you are experiencing is caused by not releasing the old outside ski before engaging the new outside ski. You must move your cm (belly button) over your old outside ski to release it, before engaging a new edge. Movements are ---diagional out of the old turn and then diagional to the inside of the new turn. The diagional movement out of the old turn releases it and diagionally into the new turn reingages your skis.

RW
Thinking about this it makes sense, when it happens I find I am well balanced on the uphill ski, hence I don't wreck, but my other leg (old outside) is W A Y over there.

Thanks Ron, I will make a point of paying attention to weighting the old outside leg to end it's turn and then transition.
post #10 of 14
Marmot,
I noticed you posted a reply to Dchan's suggestion about not being centered during the last half of the turn. It sounds like you compensate by allowing the left foot to drift into a tighter arc. Which forces you to do two things, the sequential edge change Ron described so well and the compensatory weight transfer to the inside ski. Mostly because releasing the right ski first would require a huge lateral (downhill) move.

This defensive move is quite common. I suspect speed control might have something to do with doing this maneuver. However, without seeing it live it is hard to say why you do it. It is a fairly easy fix to describe but a really hard habit to break.

Think about maintaining a more constant width stance throughout the turns. Start by keeping your feet under your torso as you turn (instead of seeking such high edge angles). When you can acheive this, think about allowing your torso to start moving across the skis by allowing it to continue to move downhill while the skis turn across the hill. Then start adding edge angle with both legs instead of allowing the inside foot to drift into that tighter arc. A result of this focus should be more parallel lower leg shafts and a more constant width stance.
Since your body is closer to being over the right ski at the end of the turn, the huge downhill move and the sequential edge change are both unnecessary.
post #11 of 14
Not seeing makes it hard to diagnose, but I tend to agree with Ron and 219.
The root cause may be you are trying to use the inside ski too much, causing it to be too far inside and you are too much over it and not close enough to the outside ski to get on the other side of it. See what happens if you use it less.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ron, Ghost and Justanother...

I think this is what is happening. Just this year I have really been working on using both skis. Yes it does happen when I am going faster. And I think I am staying uphill for whatever reason.

whats weird is I should be doing it with the left and not the right as my right leg is my stronger one, so I am not sure why I don't move downhill and stand on it. I seem to be fine the other way.

Just old straight ski habits being stubborn I think. That is how I used to ski, big change to the uphill ski then transition over and make the turn. My insructor showed me early this year I was 100% backwards on that. I know exactly what you are saying about getting onto the downhill.

Thanks to all, sometimes it's just hard to know what you are doing wrong when you know the right way and think you are doing it.

I'll report back later this week.

I think it's my motorcyclist in me comming out again. Love the lean, but I realize it's no good in skiing. But mommy it feels so good
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmot mb
whats weird is I should be doing it with the left and not the right as my right leg is my stronger one, so I am not sure why I don't move downhill and stand on it. I seem to be fine the other way.
Mtb: do I understand you to mean that you are having more problems when initiating turns to the left? If that is so, it makes sense. Let me ask you this: if you are to stand on one leg, which leg has better balance?

Consider the possibility that you strongly favour your R leg for balancing. That means transition into R turns might feel more natural because you have an easier time engaging the inside R ski. In contrast, transition into L turns might feel more awkward because your CM naturally shy away from your L leg, making it harder to engage the inside L ski.

Think about your lateral positioning when you are finishing a right turn, in the moment leading up to transitioning into a new left turn. Then think about your lateral positioning when you are finishing a left turn and transitioning into a new right turn. Is your lateral positioning (also fore/aft) different in these two transitions?
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
Mtb: do I understand you to mean that you are having more problems when initiating turns to the left? If that is so, it makes sense. Let me ask you this: if you are to stand on one leg, which leg has better balance?
Umm hard to say I'm a pretty balanced guy so I couldn't say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
Consider the possibility that you strongly favour your R leg for balancing. That means transition into R turns might feel more natural because you have an easier time engaging the inside R ski. In contrast, transition into L turns might feel more awkward because your CM naturally shy away from your L leg, making it harder to engage the inside L ski.

Think about your lateral positioning when you are finishing a right turn, in the moment leading up to transitioning into a new left turn. Then think about your lateral positioning when you are finishing a left turn and transitioning into a new right turn. Is your lateral positioning (also fore/aft) different in these two transitions?
I see where you are going with this. Perhaps I balance better on my inside ski one way more than the other and hence different CM for a L or R turn.

But I am finding when this stray right leg happens I am well weighted on my left leg, hence when my right go wazoo way out there, I still am in control, standing on my left and simply recover. But this doesn't happen every turn, just now and then. but it's always the right leg way out there when it does. and it only happens at the end of turn.

Usually I am trying to now end the left turn and begin to initiate a right turn but... what the...... my right is still making a left turn but way over there and angled largely verticle.

If I am correct as others have stated I may be too weighted onto my left and not enough on the right. I should maybe have more weight on the right to end the turn, then transition. Probably a back seat left turn scenario. I am back and too uphill.

Regardless good point and I will try it out and watch for fore/aft differances and balance next time out. Thanks.
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