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How hard to file edges?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
How hard and how many times do you file the edges. It seems that if I keep pushing, the file will keep filing. I am guessing I only need to apply so much pressure to get the job done?
post #2 of 29
As long as the file is pulling a curl off the edge, your moving metal! It's that simple.

Hard edges take harder files Look for the word "Chrome" in the file descrition or just get files from ARTEC.

A few passes tip to tail should be enough in any sharpening session.

I've never filed the edges to nothing before the ski went dead for other reasons.

CalG
post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
How hard and how many times do you file the edges. It seems that if I keep pushing, the file will keep filing. I am guessing I only need to apply so much pressure to get the job done?
If you're starting out, you can use a permanent black marker (Sharpie, but don't use the pointy ones. Use the ones with a flat head, jsut becasue they are easier to apply) to mark the edges. When you've removed the black, you're done (usually). You'll also be able to see what kind of bevel you have this way too.
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docjoque
If you're starting out, you can use a permanent black marker (Sharpie, but don't use the pointy ones. Use the ones with a flat head, jsut becasue they are easier to apply) to mark the edges. When you've removed the black, you're done (usually). You'll also be able to see what kind of bevel you have this way too.
Very true, and not enough people know about marking the edges (even though it makes a lot of sense, people often over lok the easiest answers).

In terms of how much to file, personally, I will keep filing until all the burrs are gone and I can feel a "clean" cut the entire length of the edge. If your file is "skipping" on the edge, most likely its case hardened in that spot, and a diamond should cut through that so the file will cut evenly.
post #5 of 29
You shouldn't need to use too much pressure on your files if they are sharp. One key thing to remeber is to LET THE TOOLS DO THE WORK. You shouldn't feel like you got done working out when you're done tuning. Keep your tools in good condition, and replace them when they start to show fatigue/wear.
post #6 of 29
What doc said .... and remember, a file only cuts one way (direction).
post #7 of 29
I use 5 overlapping strokes my 1st pass, then 3 then 2 then tip to tail twice. So never more then 5 passes per edge.
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all! I went over the edges with a firm run and they are fine, no spots that grabbed. What a difference in the ski over what they are like coming from the factory. After doing this a few trimes now, how can anyone ski on a new ski without fixing the edges and putting real coats of wax on?
post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
Duplicate post
post #10 of 29
If you only have a fine-point Sharpie handy, use the side of the tip.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
Thanks to all! I went over the edges with a firm run and they are fine, no spots that grabbed. What a difference in the ski over what they are like coming from the factory. After doing this a few trimes now, how can anyone ski on a new ski without fixing the edges and putting real coats of wax on?
this is a strange comment. Every ski I have ever owned iover the years years skied absolutely perfectly right out of the wrapper on the factory tune. majority being Volkl or Atomic!
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
In checking my new Heads and in speaking with a friend who also hand tunes, we have both found the edges to be off somewhat on one ski on each of our new skis. WAx-wise, there is no comparison.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
In checking my new Heads and in speaking with a friend who also hand tunes, we have both found the edges to be off somewhat on one ski on each of our new skis. WAx-wise, there is no comparison.
I was not talking about wax.

An edge being "off somewhat" sounds academic. I am talking straight skiability! it is almost impossible to duplicate the high quality ceramic disc finish currently out on most hgih end skis these days.

I ski the factory tune as long as possible!
post #14 of 29
for diamond stones, same?polish and not change what is already established.how many passes should i make with , say blue ,red green diamond stones
post #15 of 29
daimons stones are different. I do not ever diamond stone my base edge or even touch it after the initial tune. side edges you use an back & forth polishing actionlike you would sharpening a knife. You don''t have to over due it. You are just smoothing out the prevoius tools grit wwith a finer grit & finer grit as you go. so until it is polished & smooth to your liking!

Less is more with ski tuning. If you are just polishing for the sake of polishing I would say you don't really need to do that. You should have a specific goal or reason you are working on your edges and once that is accomplished. you are finished.

So, Is it to remove knicks or burrs? Sharpen your edges to where you want them?

Increase or decrease side edge bevel? (You would use a file & then diamond stone.)

Does this make some sense?
post #16 of 29
yeah. i take your advice about the base. i was doing only to maintain same bevels and remove any burrs or small degrees of sharpening on side edge bevel
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
yeah. i take your advice about the base. i was doing only to maintain same bevels and remove any burrs or small degrees of sharpening on side edge bevel
the only thing I do on the base edge is use a stone flat against the base edge to reove any hanging burr from working on the side edge!
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
I was not talking about wax.

An edge being "off somewhat" sounds academic. I am talking straight skiability! it is almost impossible to duplicate the high quality ceramic disc finish currently out on most hgih end skis these days.

I ski the factory tune as long as possible!
Just over-anxious to tune!
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
Just over-anxious to tune!
I can relate. Get some old crappy skis and practice and tune to your heart's content before you jump onto your expensive skis!
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have beenb very careful and have been fine. I used to do some wood working so its not that much different. I just go slow. Waxing is just fun! I really love to see the results of your hard work.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
I have beenb very careful and have been fine. I used to do some wood working so its not that much different. I just go slow. Waxing is just fun! I really love to see the results of your hard work.
I don't mind waxin', I hate scraping Can i send you some of my skis to wax?
post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
The first scrape kinda sucks, once I get all the thick stuff off, then its fun, its very much like woodworking, carefully working the wax into the grain, then brushing it in, I do enjoy that. Or at least for the two pair I own!
post #23 of 29
Recently I learned to rub on the wax real good and then iron in. Way less wax to scrape off.
post #24 of 29
I'm new to edge tuning this year. I think I may be getting "good" at it though. Tonight my fingers slipped off the bevel tool and the edge sliced my index finger like a razor blade. Too sharp, methinks.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
nahh, not too sharp. just right.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
nahh, not too sharp. just right.
Maybe for the east coast, but that's generally an indication of an edge with a burr left on it. A very sharp highly polished edge without any burr shouldn't easily cut your hand. It will cut it if you slip onto it very hard, but the edge should feel smooth to your finger tips and you should be able to pass your hand down the edge without fearing that you will cut skin.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Maybe for the east coast, but that's generally an indication of an edge with a burr left on it. A very sharp highly polished edge without any burr shouldn't easily cut your hand. It will cut it if you slip onto it very hard, but the edge should feel smooth to your finger tips and you should be able to pass your hand down the edge without fearing that you will cut skin.
Now that's an interesting statement. I wonder if I misunderstand the anatomy of a burr.

The edge does feel pretty smooth. Although I haven't really gotten the technique down for getting it perfectly so... working on that is how I cut my finger. Heh.

Anyway, it wasn't like I just ran my finger down the edge and it sliced like a sharp knife into a tomato. I can't cut myself just rubbing my finger down the edge. My hand released with a fair bit of force. What surprised me about the cut was how smooth it is.. like a razor blade cut.. not like a dull serated knife cut. I kind of thought this would be indicative of an edge without many burrs.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Maybe for the east coast, but that's generally an indication of an edge with a burr left on it. A very sharp highly polished edge without any burr shouldn't easily cut your hand. It will cut it if you slip onto it very hard, but the edge should feel smooth to your finger tips and you should be able to pass your hand down the edge without fearing that you will cut skin.
Glad you posted it, I was going to say the same thing
post #29 of 29
Wear gloves.
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