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dropping and landing off cornices - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Something I'm surprised hasn't been said yet, a great spot to practice is the infamous stunt ditch, aka Half Pipe. You can use this to get used to driving the hands down, rolling the shoulders forward, and trying to maintain constant ski/snow contact.
post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
Something I'm surprised hasn't been said yet, a great spot to practice is the infamous stunt ditch, aka Half Pipe. You can use this to get used to driving the hands down, rolling the shoulders forward, and trying to maintain constant ski/snow contact.
That's a great idea, especially for those of us in the East who are "cornice deprived".
post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese

In this pic, I actually got more air than I expected. I dropped about 25 feet. Note, the same sweater
Nice Sweater Phil, From the looks of the equipment, I'm guessing that this pic was not from last week? Wheres the recent stuff
post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I know where you mean. Much of that slope actually gets groomed by a high angle winch cat now, but there is still a cornice just past Jims that is really steep and scary with a rock in the middle of it. Good memory! The picture below looks North towards Chair 6, shows Jim's cliff on the right of the cornice drop I think you were talking about. Pictures just don't do this justice.

Nah, that ain't it either. But its cool. The rock in my photo was on skiers left when hucking through the air. So either they're behind where you're standing taking that picture or they are on the other side of that cliff(hidden from view in this picture you just provided). it sorta seems like the area they are plowing over with a cat used to be a big long cornice with some rock outcroppings here and there..but hey..its been a long time...but definitely..your shot above is not it either.
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevescho
On the preparation for landing, I note that most of you are keeping the tips pointed down, skis almost parallel to slope. Sitting back is a no-no. What about spine angle? It looks like phil is kinda standing straight and tucking his skis a little under him, whereas MTT looks like he's leaning forward (almost like he's skiing on air). Do you lean back, or forward, or turn slightly forward in the air, or what?

The other thing I wanted to ask about is what's reasonable conditions for trying this? As someone noted, the Wall and Cornice are often windswept/icy on the landing area off potential jumps, but not always (as Cirque's post shows). And sometimes in between, like crud, or smallish moguls and some traverse paths. It's not perfect deep powder. Will I be flying like a bat-o-hell on the landing?
Me personally, I never liked to land in powder. Yea, its soft. If the slope is steep you don't really need powder and in fact it would be better to land on a nice firm (but not too firm) surface. I just personally prefer that compared to windslab or even powder where my skis are going to plunge into the snow and do god knows what until I get my bearings. But obviously, pure ice would suck. Windslab could suck. crust...would really suck. I have jumped off some smaller cornices where the snow was soft up top and looked like a nice soft landing and when I landed it was pure frozen solid crust with nothing to edge on. Pretty freaky and not reccomended.

At least in powder its soft and if you mess up you're just going to tumble around in it and stop pretty fast (not slide to the bottom in a yard sale).
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by dewdman42

At least in powder its soft and if you mess up you're just going to tumble around in it and stop pretty fast (not slide to the bottom in a yard sale).
that's the problem with softer snow. You "stop pretty fast".
that's what breaks bones, tears ligaments and and shears cartilage.
harder snow is typically safer for landings because the force of the landing (with a mishap or not) gets transferred to the direction of travel as opposed to stopping and working on one's skeleton.
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTT
Nice Sweater Phil, From the looks of the equipment, I'm guessing that this pic was not from last week? Wheres the recent stuff
Actually it is from 2 seasons ago at A-Basin. And yes, i still have the sweater .
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Actually it is from 2 seasons ago at A-Basin. And yes, i still have the sweater .
i think the sweater rocks.
nothing cooler than a skilled skier in heinously outdated clothing
who lets her/his skiing do the talking.
y'all oughta see the rags i wear most of the time......
i used to take great pride in wearing my leather motorcycle 'cutoffs' over my dale o' norway sweater, with ancient navy-blue phenix insulated pants.
kind of a sonny barger meets stein erikson thing.
post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
You could be. Watch Nick when he lands his heli. He actually hits the snow with the skis ready to engage his first turn.

It's great to watch Nick ski because everytime his skis leave the snow, (which happens a lot at the speeds he was moving) he just moves to the next set of edges and puts them back in the snow right into the new turn.

DC
Not that I look anything like Nick, : but when I go off cornices, I use his technique of having my skis ready to engage my first turn. That is how I was taught to do it, and it certainly makes me feel in control for my landing. It would, of course, be very difficult if not impossible to do this into a super-narrow chute, where you'd be straight-running your line. But I do not launch cornices into tight chutes, only into wide-enough landings to make nice turns. Must be that self-preservation thing kicking in...

I was also told to think of a pouncing cougar and emulate that when getting air.

Jeez, there must be some other ladies here who launch cornices. Pipe up with your thoughts!

Thatsagirl
post #40 of 54




post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
that's the problem with softer snow. You "stop pretty fast".
that's what breaks bones, tears ligaments and and shears cartilage.
harder snow is typically safer for landings because the force of the landing (with a mishap or not) gets transferred to the direction of travel as opposed to stopping and working on one's skeleton.

Yep!
post #42 of 54
And the prize for the first actual photo of a vertical drop that requires some technique other than catching air while ordinary skiing or skiing steep bits goes to.... LeeLau. Nice Pics
post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
And the prize for the first actual photo of a vertical drop that requires some technique other than catching air while ordinary skiing or skiing steep bits goes to.... LeeLau. Nice Pics
No kidding! Where is that, LeeLau?
post #44 of 54
Yea great shot. However, I do have to say, my 1980's cornice drop was not a "skiable steep bit" by the least bit. At least 10 feet of drop before anything skiable. Too bad the photo doesn't give it justice. Sorry to say this is the only such photo I have. Since digital camaras came out, I don't do too much cornice jumping anymore. ha ha..
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
And the prize for the first actual photo of a vertical drop that requires some technique other than catching air while ordinary skiing or skiing steep bits goes to.... LeeLau. Nice Pics
Looking at the pic and the landing, did he just roll off the edge and drop? I know I hit mine with a fair amount of speed. Not to take anything away from his drop, I know my knees would be week on that edge, but it is two different ways of flying.
post #46 of 54
well, it was a worthy drop...no doubt... and so is your "leap in the killer sweater" phil!
post #47 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
I assume your really meant perpendicular to the slope.

You want your skis parallel to the slope and your body close to a right angle to the slope.

So for Steve's question, you should be moving down the hill. Think of if you were standing on a flat space. Then tipped the flat to almost vertical. If you didn't move a muscle (of course you can't do this) your body would be almost horizontal.

DC
I actually did mean having the skis parallel to the slope and pointed down. The technical point was whether the spine angle would tip forward (also parallel to the slope), or lean back.

From your answer, I'm getting that your body tips forward too and the skis land predominantly flat on the steep angled surface.

I was just noticing from LeeLau's and Phil's latest pictures that they were leaning back a bit, as if the tails hit first. MTT's first post (his second picture frame), looks as if the landing posture is with the body nearly perpendicular to the slope and the skis landed flat. He says "you do not want to ever land with your tips up". But then, you don't want to go forward too much - I would think (better to yard sale back than forward?)

Lemme know if I have this right, yet.
post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
Something I'm surprised hasn't been said yet, a great spot to practice is the infamous stunt ditch, aka Half Pipe. You can use this to get used to driving the hands down, rolling the shoulders forward, and trying to maintain constant ski/snow contact.
I remember the very first time I ever went in a half pipe. I was cruizing by on the SGs, probably doing 40 to 50, and on the spur of the moment gave it a shot. I got a lot more vertical than I had expected.

There is nothing quite comparable to the feeling you get at tree-top level when you suddenly realize that you have to land "way down there", and you can't fly. Personally I would rather have that feeling on soft snow on a steep slope; it sucks when you overshoot the landing.
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
And the prize for the first actual photo of a vertical drop that requires some technique other than catching air while ordinary skiing or skiing steep bits goes to.... LeeLau. Nice Pics
Agreed,

LeeLau did anyone have a guess as to the distance of the drop look's 30'ish to me?
Very nice pic II love the way you caught him as his skis and poles are just entering the snow, would like to have seen one where he was sking away from the bomb hole.

And did you all notice the cool Blue ski's? What are those? BRO MODELS!
post #50 of 54
sorry - just noticed the question.

He came off the edge with very little speed.

The landing was steep but windslab with about 9 inches of body penetration.

Skier was on 188 Super Stiff Bro Models.

Drop was about 30 feet; at that point wind blows tips apart so its not a bad idea to cross your tips and uncross just before landing.

Its also not a bad idea to land on the tails and backslap the landing just to absorb shock; nice to have a pack for that.
post #51 of 54
Don't lean too far back, don't lean too far forward. Centered! Just like skiing. if you're too far back the skis will squirt forward when you land. If you're too far forward you risk going over the handle bars when you land, especially if the snow is extra soft and deep. If the landing is steep enough (and it should be), there is no need whatsoever to fall on your ass or your backpack or anything like that. Personally, I think you should be somewhat perpendicular to your skis, just like you would be if you were skiing down the same slope.
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by dewdman42
Don't lean too far back, don't lean too far forward. Centered! Just like skiing. if you're too far back the skis will squirt forward when you land. If you're too far forward you risk going over the handle bars when you land, especially if the snow is extra soft and deep. If the landing is steep enough (and it should be), there is no need whatsoever to fall on your ass or your backpack or anything like that. Personally, I think you should be somewhat perpendicular to your skis, just like you would be if you were skiing down the same slope.
Up to a certain height that's works, Above that height unless the landing is really steep, you can't absorb the energy without getting hurt unless you do some sort of back-slap/break-fall.
post #53 of 54
Nice pics LeeLau. However, where you have indicated the "splat", is actually the pre-existing crater seen behind the skier in the 2nd photo. You buddy landed below and to the viewer's right of that big bomb hole. His crater isn't nearly as easy to see, but if you look for the tracks coming out into the skied-off traverse, you'll see where he landed. It was probably 10 feet below the big crater.

Were was that?
post #54 of 54
Its the cornices on Symphony Bowl on skiers left; you get in there by cutting in off to the right of the SunBowl entrance.

You could be right john - i was looking through the lens and went over to inspect the body crater just to see being a snow geek and all. very interesting layering going on due to sun and wind effect
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