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Woodstove "hotboxing" - your opinions?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I have recently been hotwaxing my skis, then leaving them in the basement near the woodstove for a day. Not too near, but near enough that they stay warm. I then cool them at room temperature and then scrape/brush.

Do you think this is good (similar to racers hotboxing) for getting more wax absorption?

Do you think this is bad for any reason?
post #2 of 26

How hot is it?

I don't see it as being very effective unless it's hot enough to give the wax some flow. If you were doing the Felix process where the first coat is with Zardoz/PFPE then OK, but your other lookout is airborne grit and dust, esp around a woodstove.

Did you look at the thread that discussed the Tognar and similar hot box design, using 3 light bulbs as heaters? 100F is not unreasonable for those.
post #3 of 26
I believe 140F was the ideal temp. Why don't you hang a thermomator nextto the ceiling above the wood stove and see how hot it gets there. Then decide what to do next.

But in real life, does it really matter?
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Probably only about 80-99 F where they are.

It seems to make the wax last longer, but who knows?
post #5 of 26
So woodbox one ski. Then let the gf mix 'em up for ya.
post #6 of 26

Hotbox

Quote:
Do you think this is good (similar to racers hotboxing) for getting more wax absorption?
No, it is not. However as stated in the previous discussion, it is preferable after waxing to leave the skis somewhere warm than somewhere cold.

- Fossil
post #7 of 26
I think YOU may have been too close to the stove.
post #8 of 26
Sometimes if it's a really nice warm sunny day I will lay them out, base up, by the pool. They like that.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD
Sometimes if it's a really nice warm sunny day I will lay them out, base up, by the pool. They like that.
You tried some beers also, maybe they will like that even more
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taff
You tried some beers also, maybe they will like that even more
Not too much or they'll get fat.

It's the ladies' I mind most, always running for Campari & sodas.
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD
Sometimes if it's a really nice warm sunny day I will lay them out, base up, by the pool. They like that.
My skis feel very appreciated, they have great self-esteem.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Not too much or they'll get fat.
LOL, they will go from looking like a Metron to a Spatula.


My concern with "Hot boxes" is what does it do to the binding and the greased mechanisms in them? That lube is designed for cold temps and at 140 deg or so, won't that lube melt and come out of the binding leaving them dry?
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
My concern with "Hot boxes" is what does it do to the binding and the greased mechanisms in them? That lube is designed for cold temps and at 140 deg or so, won't that lube melt and come out of the binding leaving them dry?
I've never seen any type of grease with a peak operating range less than 66 C (150 F). As far as grease and lubricants go, that's a pretty low temperature. So unless the bindings are lubed with butter, I don't think there's anything to worry about.
post #14 of 26
Double Post. Oops!
post #15 of 26

wax shock cooling

Hello skimangojazz,

I have always left waxed skis in a warm place for a day before scraping until I ran into a procedure recommended by Kuu sport wax (www.kuu.com). They claim that warm skis retain wax better if they are cooled quickly. I tried it and it seems to work but a little hard to tell if it's any better.
Here is exerpt from waxing manual: Wax Curing: Cooling the wax and base at room temperature is fine for general waxing, shop and rental purposes. COLD SHOCK CURING : This is the method, developed by KUU Wax Technologies that is used for competition. If the snowboard or skis are placed out in the cold or base down in the snow, right after waxing, the surface area of the base and wax forms a tighter molecule structure that locks MORE wax and FURTHER into the base than conventional methods.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD
Sometimes if it's a really nice warm sunny day I will lay them out, base up, by the pool. They like that.
Be careful! They do sunburn! It least, skis stored in front of a window all summer with no wax can suffer some real damage.
post #17 of 26
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
kuu also recommends using a citrus cleaner, which I've heard over and over again is not a good idea, so it makes me wonder about their scientific knowledge.
post #19 of 26

I don't think 100 degrees is going to cut it...

...the Toko site says 140 degrees for three hours. That sounds pretty aggressive to me. When I first built my hot box, my initial temps were around 100 degrees, and that didn't seem to do much. I played with the bulb wattage until I got it up to 120 degrees, and the results were a lot better, and I haven't seen any problems with bindings, skis, plates, and so forth. See my articles about hotboxing:

www.rmmskiracing.org

Go to the SnowNews and Articles page, go down past all the SnowNews issues, see the Articles section...
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by martino
COLD SHOCK CURING : This is the method, developed by KUU Wax Technologies ....
I've read Willi Wiltz saying exactly the opposite.

Who's right? I don't know.
post #21 of 26

Willi Wiltz is Swix and has different wax formulations and different recs. I have used the Kuus recommended cold dure shock with their Mach II LF waxes and have had excellent speed, slide and durability. The Mach II blue is the fastest wax I ever skied until today. It is also the most difficult to apply. It is very brittle!

 

I had the fastest wax job of my life today using first some Racewax.com Molybdenum Flouromax, crayoned on, followed by a nother crayoned on coat of the Mach II red. both applications were corked in, hot waxed at around 120C, then cold shock cured. Man was this combo FAST!

 

Brian from Canmore

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

I have recently been hotwaxing my skis, then leaving them in the basement near the woodstove for a day. Not too near, but near enough that they stay warm. I then cool them at room temperature and then scrape/brush.

Do you think this is good (similar to racers hotboxing) for getting more wax absorption?

Do you think this is bad for any reason?


It's not going to hurt anything.  Really, for a soft wax like Dominator Base Renew, 120 F would work fine. 

 

If you could get reliable 140 to 150 F over the entire ski, then you would be golden.

 

Also wax does not need to become totally liquid for it to work.  It's more a matter of time than heat.  Pre-season I cook all my skis for many many hours.  Then iron when needed again.  Makes a huge difference.

 

I would not like to see the skis in the hot sun.  It will melt a super soft wax on a black base, but the UV light is not good for it.  A super hot attic space is awesome for off season wax absorption.  If it gets to 150 F you can do some hard waxes too.

 

post #23 of 26

Oh yea, some stoves have fans to push the hot air into the room.  A person could duct that flow into a box.  Monitor the temp a while.  Get it dialed in.  May get some fumes in the house though.

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 

The post you're quoting by the way is from 9 years ago!

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

The post you're quoting by the way is from 9 years ago!


Old threads never die Mango!   You have come a long way baby!  Your threads live!

post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 

Oh yea, some stoves have fans to push the hot air into the room.  A person could duct that flow into a box.  Monitor the temp a while.  Get it dialed in.  May get some fumes in the house though.

 

 

Does anyone in this thread have a rocket mass heater or a stove with an exhaust bell? 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Woodstove "hotboxing" - your opinions?