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Ski Resort that gets the most snow - Page 2

post #31 of 52
I wonder why There are terms like Cascade Concrete and Sierra Cement? Could it have something to do with the quality of The snow pack? Is it some disinformation campaign put on by Ski Utah or maybe by those sneaky Colorado resorts?
Hey have you thought of Afghanistan? Now they might have extreme snow covering up all those old rusting Russian land mines. Now that would be real extreme skiing.
post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
But the fact is, I live in Houston.
Don't mess with Texas.
post #33 of 52
Sorry to disillusion you, but there really isn't anyplace where it snows 8 inches every day. Snowfall at Alta, Mt. Baker and anywhere else falls unevenly, thus an advance book week runs at least a 50% chance of no deep powder. The best way to maximize powder is to live near it and have a flexible schedule. For consistency of snowfall Grand Targhee is the best we have in North America.

High vs. low water content snow:
1. For a 6-9 inch storm I'll take the high water content, because you'll go right through the low content snow and be skiing on the subsurface.
2. 1+ foot of new snow I'll take the low water content. Sierra Cement skis nice when its untracked, but after it's tracked it sets up and will really throw you around. I was a pleasure skiing the light and dry chopped up pow at Jackson Hole in January.

It is perverse that most of the low water content places (Colorado etc.) get storms a few inches at a time while the Sierra and Cascades get snow feet at a time. This is why nearly everyone loves Alta: it gets the multifoot dumps but is still fairly low water content.

Niseko may well be the best lift service in the world by Bobby Chicken's criteria, best as I understand it.
post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
First of all, I never said I would rather have six feet out Mt. Baker. After three of four feet of solid powder the stuff on the bottom is compressed and no longer powder. Also, after a huge storm I would rather have Alta. But I've been to Alta and I didn't get the storm. After a small storm, I would rather have Baker simply because it's pre-compressed snow so it does last longer. For example, I went to Steamboat and got 14". It was the best inbounds skiing in the world; but only for a day. I went to Brighton, Utah and got six inches of snow that was more like sleet (it was an aberration, they don't normally get that, its usually just like Alta, so don't think bad thinks. That stuff was worse for the first day, but even after being heavily tracked it was still in great shape. That six inch storm made for better snow for half the time. 14 inches would have been better than Steamboat after the first run and would have lasted for 3 or 4 days. So yes, when skiing virgin powder snow quality matters. But unless your heliskiing, you get only 4 or 5 runs of powder before its gone. Its great, but I'll take the snow that stays good just as happily. This is about consistency: extreme snow every day, because when I go somewhere for a week, I go to ski for a week, not 2 days. And when you say that the heavy stuff turns to ice faster, I want to cry. When the sun bakes it, it takes the water first and so the snow stays the same, possibly even gets better. I've skied them both and was just as pleased, if not more pleased, skiing the heavy stuff. If I lived there and could go skiing only after a dump, then I would appreciate the light stuff. But the fact is, I live in Houston. Quit telling me about Alta. I've been there, got the amount of snow I was supposed to get and was displeased.
Bobby - sounds like you have had some atypical experiences in Utah, but also like you have some misconceptions about what happens to heavy wet snow with traffic and sun. You could always try some other Rockies regions (Colorado, Montana, interior BC) for what seems to be the consensus lighter/drier snow. If you really want it seek out the heavy/wet snow from the Sierra, Cascades and coastal BC - maybe that's your thing. Let us know the results of your research.
post #35 of 52
Thread Starter 
I definitely understand you guys' arguments, but it doesn't seem to have been my experience, as i've said about icy conditions immediately after powder days at SLC and Steamboat. Enough bickering about heavy snow/light snow. If I regret my experience in heavy snow (which I will admit I haven't skied much of), that's my fault. I really don't think reasoning is going to get me anywhere; skiing it will. As for my comment about 8 inches of snow a day, I didn't mean that it fell every day, just that over a week or 2 it usually averages out to more or less 8 inches a day. And I like Crockers comment about lift service; maybe I need helicopter service. I think I fully understand the situation in North America/ Japan now as much as a can by talking. Anyone know anything about the Southern hemisphere? Or should I start another thread?
post #36 of 52
Don't be fooled, I've skied lots of storms at Alta/Snowbird and for sure they aren't ALL that light fluffy stuff, it is often windy during a storm and that packs things down, esp in the open, and even saying that, probably 50/50 the storms are full of moisture and the powder skis moderately heavy. No problem, that's fun too.
post #37 of 52
Thread Starter 
Is that a recommendation for Baker, Alta, somewhere else or not a recommendation at all.
post #38 of 52

Whistler, Red mountain,Whitewater, Fernie, Castle mountain

These resorts in B.C. and Alberta. are not only known for large Quantities of POW but incredible terrain as well. True "skiers mountains". the last couple of weeks they have been getting dumped on . Castle Mountain in southern Alberta got over 100cm in a 10 day period and boasts the longest uninterupted fall line in N.America and no crowds! look them up on the web. Sunshine Village Alberta, Lake Louise ,Kicking horse B.C.have all been getting
good snow and the terrain is world class. Marmot basin at Jasper has been getting it the last couple weeks as well ,and it's snowing now. I guess I'm posting because I think Quality of the snow and terrain Matters as much as Quantity. The Cat skiing in The south west Kootney region of B.C. (2 1/2 hrs.
from Spokane Wash.) is powder Nirvana and easily accesible from Rossland and Nelson .
post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
Is that a recommendation for Baker, Alta, somewhere else or not a recommendation at all.
If you were referrring to my comment, it is a recommendation to ski Alta/Snowbird with the nod towards Snowbird on terrain and Alta on slghtly more snow, (it seems every local says Alta underestimates and always get a little more than Snowbird). To me skiing Snowbird is just incredible for expert terrain, once you learn how to ski the mtn. That's my answer if you are sitting in your living room and ask, where can I ski in 3 weeks or 3 months from now, where I have the best chance for the best snow with good terrain.

Maybe Kirkwood comes in there as a close 2nd. Jackson, not as much snow and sun problems faces SE. Squaw - huge but more intermittent storms, sierra cement. BC, have to hit it right, only skied Whistler one trip, the terrain is great, but they have "snow and weather" problems. Irrefutable, when it's good it great, but year after year I watch these reports, talk to people whom skied there and it seems you can just as well have a yucky trip with warm weather, even rain(almost impossible at LCC in winter-just won't happen). But one good things about a skier life, hopefully, by just taking one trip a year, you can hit most of these spots and make up your own mind. (CO is not even in the running)

Baker, where's that at?<g> I know nothing, except my impression is that few make a destination trip, there must be a reason.
post #40 of 52
As a Baker local I can tell you something about it. It is a ski area, not a resort. It has 1000 acres of inbounds runs and 1500 ft. of vertical. It has no on mountain accomodations (except for the parking lot). The closest services are about 18 miles away in Glacier which is a very small place. After that it's 55 miles to Bellingham which has all of the services, including multiple daily non-stop flights to SLC beginning in June.

With a base of 3500 ft. you can't count on the weather. Sometimes it's fantastic and sometimes it sucks. Locals can go when it's good and stay home when it's not, so we get lots of great days of new snow and powder (real powder does happen here from time to time). I would never pick a place like Baker for a sure-fire vacation. If you want to move here for a season you might have something going, but pick just one week out of a year and who knows what you'll get?

The terrain is all over the map. Much of it is steep and varied. Black diamonds here are double diamonds at most of the places I've skied. There is very little grooming.

If you don't like being around boarders, don't come here. There are more boards than skis on the hill. I don't see too many of the problems with poor behavior of boarders that others have griped about, but I stay on the part of the mtn. that requires experienced riding so I see a select group.

I guess I'm saying that it's not a good idea to pick Baker as a vacation destination. I can vouch for interior BC. The skiing there is fantastic.
post #41 of 52
Thread Starter 
I deffinitely understand that Baker is [edit: not] a resort, and that does bother me at all. I hate people who are there to be there, not to ski there. My only concern with boarders is their snow-destruction, but the fewer crowds at Baker counteracts that, right. But snow being erratic. Can you tell more about that? Does it come in dumps so huge the area closes? It rains often, even in January? Is very little grooming bad? I hate to see those machines systematically destroying my powder. Difficulty is definitely one of the things I look for. And all ski resorts seem erratic in snowfall to me. You can get 50 inches or you can get 3 inches durring a weeks snow at a lot of resorts. Maybe I'll give SLC a couple more tries. But if I don't get the snow I want.... None of the places I saw in BC seem that good. Are any of them better than Brighton, Alta, Kirkwood, etc.?
post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
I deffinitely understand that Baker is a resort, and that does bother me at all. I hate people who are there to be there, not to ski there. My only concern with boarders is their snow-destruction, but the fewer crowds at Baker counteracts that, right. But snow being erratic. Can you tell more about that? Does it come in dumps so huge the area closes? It rains often, even in January? Is very little grooming bad? I hate to see those machines systematically destroying my powder. Difficulty is definitely one of the things I look for. And all ski resorts seem erratic in snowfall to me. You can get 50 inches or you can get 3 inches durring a weeks snow at a lot of resorts. Maybe I'll give SLC a couple more tries. But if I don't get the snow I want.... None of the places I saw in BC seem that good. Are any of them better than Brighton, Alta, Kirkwood, etc.?
Dude are you even reading the replies before posting?

Posaune said just before your post above that "as a Baker local I can tell you something about it. It is a ski area, not a resort."
post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
snow being erratic. Can you tell more about that? Does it come in dumps so huge the area closes? It rains often, even in January? Is very little grooming bad?
To answer your questions: yes, yes, and in my opinion, no.

I'm not so sure "often" is correct for the rain thing, that is a subjective measurement. It sure isn't unusual to have rain in January. Neither is it unusual to have several days in a row of 8" - 12" dumps or more.

If you don't like groomers like me, then you would like very little grooming. Most of the time there is enough new snow to cover over problems (like frozen rained over snow).

By the way, today we had cold temps., sun, and leftover powder (the real stuff) and crud from a huge dump which closed the area on Wednesday. It reopened on Thursday but the dump continued. It was wonderful.
post #44 of 52
Pomerelle, ID. Look it up. 138" at the base, 180" at the top, 40" in the last week.
post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbler
Yeah but those are in centimeters.....

And you have to wear really ugly neon fart bags.
post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49
I wonder why There are terms like Cascade Concrete and Sierra Cement? Could it have something to do with the quality of The snow pack? Is it some disinformation campaign put on by Ski Utah or maybe by those sneaky Colorado resorts?
Hey have you thought of Afghanistan? Now they might have extreme snow covering up all those old rusting Russian land mines. Now that would be real extreme skiing.

Afghanistan is blowing up.
post #47 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gores95
Posaune said just before your post above that "as a Baker local I can tell you something about it. It is a ski area, not a resort."
Typo, I left out the word "not" as in "not a resort". Kind of important I guess. Sorry for the confusion. Hey, do I remind you of reporters, quoting people to mean the opposite of what they really said?
post #48 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by irul&ublo
Afghanistan is blowing up.
So I'm supposed to ski there? Or just go there and die?
post #49 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune
By the way, today we had cold temps., sun, and leftover powder (the real stuff) and crud from a huge dump which closed the area on Wednesday. It reopened on Thursday but the dump continued.
If you're going to close your resort, that has to be the best reason to do it.

So if I do decide to come, is there any time of the year that is best? Do you know what skiing after rain is like or do you just forget it after rain?
post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyChicken
So if I do decide to come, is there any time of the year that is best? Do you know what skiing after rain is like or do you just forget it after rain?
January through the end of April is a pretty good time. If it stays above freezing after a rain then the skiing can be OK though not above average. If it freezes after rain, get a good movie, kick back, and wait for more snow.
post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by xcountry41
Castle Mountain in southern Alberta got over 100cm in a 10 day period and boasts the longest uninterupted fall line in N.America
What does that even mean? I did a search on the web for Castle mountain, and that phrase "longest uninterupted fall line" was in the hit for the resort web site, but with a little more than half the vertical of Blackcomb (2800 feet v. 5200 feet), I'm having trouble understanding what that means. :
post #52 of 52

Good Snow Prior To Christmas

I am looking for ideas for a Pre- Christmas ski trip out west this year.

What areas would be good bets for "ample snow" prior to the holidays?

We have been to Alta/Snowbird but were condsidering Jackson Hole/ GT
or Monmoth or Colorado.

Any opinions would be helpful!!

THanks
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