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early edge engagement question

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
i am a long time skier trying to adapt my turning technique to make full advantage of the superior maneuverability of the shaped ski. i read that here that early edge engagement allows control of turn shape and ability to hold edge near bottom of turns. can i be expected to keep edges engaged throughout the turn all the way to point of release and new engagement at beginning of reverse turn?with older style skiis unweighting was the key , or was to me, to initiating new edge for reverse of turn . can i ,instead of unweighting keep edge engaged all through turn except for moment you roll ankles in to new turn? it seems likely to me. especially with the skiis i own.am i on the right track here? thank you to any that can help me.
post #2 of 11
Yes you can. That's the efficiency the modern ski allows. To take full advantage of this approach, you also need to let your hips move into the turn and forward of the feet at the point the new edges are engaged. There are many threads in the instruction forum describing these movements.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
thank you kneale, i just needed a little steering
post #4 of 11
Gary,
Positivily on the right track. Modern skis will try to move forward and out from under you after passing the fall line, putting you in the "back seat". You need to keep moving with the skis by keeping your ankles flexed. From there, you can engage the new edges well before the fall line. The turn shape from that point should be more of a C shape.

RW
post #5 of 11
Kneale, what do you say to a qualifier to Garry's question to the effect of: "only if your trail is wide enough for the ski's turning radius?"

Not quibbling, just trying to learn from people who know a lot more than me.

JoeB
post #6 of 11
Terrain certainly plays a part in the approach required. Generally, the most efficient use of modern skis calls for putting the skis on edge early and using those edges to complete turns. Some skis will turn shorter than others. If conditions/terrain call for shorter turning than "pure" use of the edges will provide, you will need to intensify the activities unless you decide to not "complete" the turns in terms of maintaining a constant speed down the slope. Commonly, additional pressure on the tips through a combination of steering and pressing with the shins will shorten turns and allow for maintaining steady speeds. This is still use of the edges, even if some tail skidding occurs.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
i am using a bit of a reaching pole plant to keep my body in a foreward position after completion of turn and beginning new reverse of turn . is this a good or bad way to keep my body foreward in order not to get in a squating or sitting back position and lose all my forward pressure on the tips? i would like to keep my upper body from hunching forward and keep my hips in line with my feet and shoulders. is there a good drill or exercise i can use to train my body to remember good body position? i am so grateful for the responses i have recieved. ,
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
i am using a bit of a reaching pole plant to keep my body in a foreward position after completion of turn and beginning new reverse of turn . is this a good or bad way to keep my body foreward in order not to get in a squating or sitting back position and lose all my forward pressure on the tips? i would like to keep my upper body from hunching forward and keep my hips in line with my feet and shoulders. is there a good drill or exercise i can use to train my body to remember good body position? i am so grateful for the responses i have recieved. ,
Gary,

I think for training purposes, try to stand on your tip toes and keep your shins pressing against the tongue of the boot will get you where you need to be better than just holding your arms forward. Standing on the tip toes will bring the hips up over the middle of the feet and you will feel the pressure on the front of the boot. Again, this is a drill that will over time get you forward and out of the back seat. After you play with this for some time, you will notice that you are skiing more forward than you may have done in the past and you will feel more of the bottom front part of the foot than the back------Wigs
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
thank you wigs, i will work on this sat and sunday . i will use these on gentle terrain as i warm up and then incorporate into all terrain , thx
post #10 of 11
garry,

Quote:
i am using a bit of a reaching pole plant to keep my body in a foreward position after completion of turn and beginning new reverse of turn . is this a good or bad way to keep my body foreward in order not to get in a squating or sitting back position and lose all my forward pressure on the tips?
Starting on easier terrain,do some stepping from one ski to the other (thousand steps) while turning and even while doing a short traverse between turns. You can only step from ski to ski if you are balanced correctly for/aft and laterally (sideways). Go for clean lines in the snow (precise edging movements). The hardest part is to step from the traverse to down the hill and around the turn. This will teach you diagional movements, out of the turn and into the next turn.

One successfull on easier terrain, start on more diffucult to moderate terrain. If the trail is crowded, don't try it. Do this on an uncrowded train b/c you will be using the whole width of the trail.

The true test is to do it on most difficult terrain. Try to spend equal time on each ski as you step. Go for clean lines in the snow and fasten your seat belt!

RW

ps: your hands and pole will be where it needs to be when you are in balance.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
ron,steps continuing though turn , like walking on skis back and forth all through and including transition with tips always in contact with snow??
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