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moguls and PMTS - Page 7

post #181 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Somewhere, I have some video of me skiing bumps on Bold Decision from a couple years ago. I might even have it on my computer if I had captured it after my reformatting of my hard drive. If not, I'll need to re-capture it and try to put it up on one of the video hosting sites. But it could be a while until I can get a chance to do that.
That would be great. I never turn down help or money.
post #182 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
John,

The trick here is the flow that you get when the absorption does not slow you down any more than the extension does. When I try to "get control" at the top of a bump, then more speed is harder. When you go slow, you can't get that flow in the zipperline. When you're travelling more laterally and using the backs of the bumps more, this fast thing does not apply.

BTW - There's a ton of pro clips on the Marco H site. But not what you want to demonstrate?
I understand what you are getting at, but it would require a pretty flat bump run where you don't need speed control and the bumps are pretty small, such as the upper flat sections on exhibition.
post #183 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Madison
who said competitors ski this way? i've skied with enough US ski team bumpers to know that they are most definitely NOT just setting their edges on the face of each bump to control speed. they are constantly absorbing and extending to maintain (relatively) even pressure on the snow. with the naked eye, it may appear that they're just pounding each bump face, but that's not really the case.

the techniques used by any good amateur bumper and those used by a world class competitor are EXACTLY the same..the competitor just speeds it up as much as humanly possible without losing control.
Dan said they ski this way. However, I agree that they don't (...anymore - that was an old style). I agree that they keep the skis on the ground, or at least very close to it) all the time, but they do not have anywhere near close enough edge pressure to redirect their CM. Only enough to get the skis over to the other side. They also use little, to no, speed control. I'm not about to teach a typical student to let their CM go straight down the fall line with the only speed control being a mild redirection of the skis. ANother issue with this, that I mentioned here a few days ago, is that the bumps they ski on in a competition are not representative of the bumps on your average ski hill which are made by the public.
post #184 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Coach,

That's exactly backwards. How could a low edge angle promote a firm edge set? And conversely, how do high edge angles on the back of the bump require greater effort to achieve?
John,

I think we're talking relative to gravity here. On the face of the bump a low edge angle to the snow will have a lot more base showing than the same edge angle on the back of the bump.
post #185 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
John,

I think we're talking relative to gravity here. On the face of the bump a low edge angle to the snow will have a lot more base showing than the same edge angle on the back of the bump.
Ya lost me Rusty. if the edge angle is 30 degrees, then it doesn't matter where you are, because it's 30 degrees relative to the surface it's touching, so the amount of base shown is the same.

However, if you mean angle relative to the slope of the fall line, then I think you have it backwards. On the face of a bump, if the bump came up a 20 degrees, then the edge angle, relative to the fall line is 10 degrees. If the back of the bump is also 20 degrees, the relative edge angle is 50 degrees.

The only thing I can make out in your arguments, is that because the surface under the face of the bump is flat or uphill relative to the direction of travel down the fall line, then you don't need as high of an edge angle to control speed. On the back of the bump, where gravity is accelerating you, you would need a higher edge angle. As was mentioned, the slope angle of the bump itself will automatically adjust the edge angle. But that's where I see the advantage of using additional A/E to gain pressure on the back of the bumps... The edge angle is there (created by the bump), so if you have pressure to the snow, you can use it to your advantage to maintain a more consistant speed. This is especially important in irrecgular bumps, where a zipper line may not be available or may not be a good line due to steep faces or troughs.
post #186 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Dan said they ski this way. However, I agree that they don't (...anymore - that was an old style). I agree that they keep the skis on the ground, or at least very close to it) all the time, but they do not have anywhere near close enough edge pressure to redirect their CM. Only enough to get the skis over to the other side. They also use little, to no, speed control. I'm not about to teach a typical student to let their CM go straight down the fall line with the only speed control being a mild redirection of the skis. ANother issue with this, that I mentioned here a few days ago, is that the bumps they ski on in a competition are not representative of the bumps on your average ski hill which are made by the public.
i can't speak for him, but i suspect dan was saying the front face edge set was one but not the only means of speed control used by competitors.

speed control is relative. notice how much slower top level female competitors ski than top level males....and they're both using the exact same techniques. the men just use slightly less edge pressure because they can piston their legs that much faster to maintain control.

so....my point is that you CAN teach an amateur to ski the zipperline using the same techniques as the pros. as they master those techniques and fine-tune their feel for the snow, they can use less and less edge pressure to increase their speed through the bumps. after that, they're only limited by their willingness to practice and their natural ability.

p.s. i agree that competition bumps are much different than your run-of-mill bumps. they're perfectly formed by machines. lots of fun if you ever get the cahnce to ski them!
post #187 of 326

Not my argument, just TRYING to explain it

Ok John, let's try it this way. We have a skier travelling laterally across a slope. When his skis are FLAT to the snow on the face of a bump (whatever portion of the ski that's in contact), the skis will be on an uphill edge position relative to the slope. When his skis are flat to the snow on the back of a bump (travelling in the same direction), the skis will be a downhill edge relative to the slope (i.e. a lower edge angle relative to the slope).
post #188 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Madison
i can't speak for him, but i suspect dan was saying the front face edge set was one but not the only means of speed control used by competitors.

speed control is relative. notice how much slower top level female competitors ski than top level males....and they're both using the exact same techniques. the men just use slightly less edge pressure because they can piston their legs that much faster to maintain control.

so....my point is that you CAN teach an amateur to ski the zipperline using the same techniques as the pros. as they master those techniques and fine-tune their feel for the snow, they can use less and less edge pressure to increase their speed through the bumps. after that, they're only limited by their willingness to practice and their natural ability.

p.s. i agree that competition bumps are much different than your run-of-mill bumps. they're perfectly formed by machines. lots of fun if you ever get the cahnce to ski them!
HM,

If there is one criticism I have with Dan's book is edge control and the role it plays on front side. He taught at a place where bumps are form by skiers (not machines). Would of love to pick his brain on this one. For now, I edge control up the front side and the firm edge set at the end helps in steering toward the upcoming bump.

BTW, is there a standard format on placement of bumps and shapes for freestyle competition?
post #189 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack97

BTW, is there a standard format on placement of bumps and shapes for freestyle competition?
good question. the only mention of course design i could find on the FIS website said:

The mogul site should have a constant pitch with one uniform fall-line.

The course should be as evenly covered in moguls as possible. Hard sharp bumps should be smoothed out; deep ruts, ice balls and snow machine tracks should be removed. Bumps that throw the competitor too far in the air should be modified.
...

Moguls may be machine constructed and all care must be taken to ensure the lines are equal and [sic] the number and size of the moguls.


it sounds like there's no specific rules about mogul shape or size - they only have to be fairly uniform over the whole course.
post #190 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Madison
it sounds like there's no specific rules about mogul shape or size - they only have to be fairly uniform over the whole course.
Thanks,

I been noticing when bumpers do their absorption, some make their knees go upward. While others, the knee go more laterally across their body. Seems like the latter make their turns higher on the bumps. Just wondering if this is technique only or due to the shape of the bumps and the steepness of the run.


Gotta check out for a while.
post #191 of 326
Dan,

I just got the book and is reading it now. I read the equipment section and has a question:

What ski length should one get? I am 6' 180lbs and is skiing salomon 1080 at 181 (but it has twin tips, so I am really looking at 175 here). Should I stay with say a 175 for mogul skis, or should I go shorter?
post #192 of 326
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan DiPiro
Thank you, Goldsbar and others in this thread who've recommended my book, Everything the Instructors Never Told You about Mogul Skiing. The book just hit the #7 spot among the 1,000 or so skiing-related books on Amazon.com! I invite you all to give it a try.

Essentially, I wrote the book because, after years of competitive mogul skiing, I began working for a very traditional ski school at a very racing-oriented ski area, and I couldn't believe the way my fellow instructors thought and talked about mogul skiing and mogul skiers. They just didn't understand the sport at all.

(It's nice to see, by the way, that several of the participants in this thread have a good handle on some mogul skiing basics.)

Here are a few of my beliefs about mogul skiing and mogul skiing instruction:
  • The ski instructing establishment uses a skiing and teaching model that is heavily based on alpine racing; although that establishment insists that this model contains all the fundamentals of good downhill skiing and that terrain variations (bumps, powder, steeps, etc.) require only small "tactical" tweaks, this is simply not true.
  • Mogul skiers use special techniques to ski bumps with control, smoothness, speed, economy and minimal punishment to their bodies; these techniques cannot be extracted from alpine-racing, because alpine racers don't use them.
  • To ski moguls well, you can't just study "How the Racers Ski"; you must study how the mogul skiers ski.
  • The techniques of competitive mogul skiers aren't just for daredevils; for years, I've been teaching ordinary advanced skiers to use these techniques, skiers as young as 10 and as old as 60.
  • Mogul techniques aren't so much difficult as they are different. When ordinary advanced skiers are taught these differences, these skiers learn to ski the zipperline.
  • My book explains all of these differences, and thereby gives the "groomed-trail expert" all of the new techniques she or he needs to become a good mogul skier.
If you're interested, you can find more of my mogul-related writing at www.mogulskiing.blogspot.com. You can order my book from just about any bookstore, and I sell it on-line at www.LearnMoguls.com.

-Dan DiPiro
Dan, THANKS for the book. Bought it, read in 1 hour and did few of my first FULL medium advanced mogul runs. Priceless! I consider myself an advanced skier, ski most of time @ K. Breaking points were: * looking ahead at least 3 moguls; * practicing quick turns on ungroomed * HOME POSITION. I ski fisher rx8 so these are not ideal for moguls but did enough good job for me. Unfortunately, I should have picked the book earlier in the season , well, will start trying in December 06.

BTW, do you live in the same town as Bode ? Is this the water or the air that produces good skiers, or maybe the woods?
post #193 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
That would be great. I never turn down help or money.
Coach, here ya go!

It turns out I had lost all my captured skiing video, so I had to recapture it. In the process I downloaded the V1 video analysis software. I highly recomment it, and it's free!

http://www.v1sports.com/Academy/ALL/

The only issue I had/have with it, is that it doesn't provide for a low res capture. My 1 minute file was something on the order of 200MB. So I used my movie making SW (Pinnacle Studio 8) to do the low res capture and I put it up on Putfile.

Here are the specifics of the video:

This is on Bold Decision at Whitetail in southern PA.
The video was shot 5 years ago (deosn't seem that long ago)
My wife hasn't had much practice videoing skiers, so it's kind of shakey
The run is a moderately steep (they call it a double black, but it would be a somewhat steep blue or easy black at a large western resort) bump run that flattens out at the bottom. The light is pretty flat, so it's hard to see the bumps.
The bumps are fairly good size on the steeper section, then small in the bottom flat section. The bumps were very irregular with no defined lines, much less a zipper line that lasted more than 2-3 bumps.
There is a pretty drastic double fall line that fall off to the skier's right.
Conditions are somewhat warm, late season, with about 6" of new snow earlier in the day that had been skied out quite a bit on a weekend day and turned pretty heavy.
Since this is from 5 years ago, the skis are longer. They are 186cm Dynastar Ski Cross 66 (Became the SC 10 the following year)

In viewing this, you'll see my skis get pushed around by the sloppy conditions a fair amount. In some cases banging together, and in other cases running apart. Other than that, I see this as okay skiing. Nothing spectacular, but not bad. It was just a fun run. I changed lines a few times, once to get around the guy in yellow, and other times just to look for better bumps.

Okay, enough.... here it is. Feel free to say what you want. I don't take criticism well, but I don't have a choice, do I?

http://media.putfile.com/jmh-bump1
post #194 of 326
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Coach, here ya go!

It turns out I had lost all my captured skiing video, so I had to recapture it. In the process I downloaded the V1 video analysis software. I highly recomment it, and it's free!

http://www.v1sports.com/Academy/ALL/

The only issue I had/have with it, is that it doesn't provide for a low res capture. My 1 minute file was something on the order of 200MB. So I used my movie making SW (Pinnacle Studio 8) to do the low res capture and I put it up on Putfile.

Here are the specifics of the video:

This is on Bold Decision at Whitetail in southern PA.
The video was shot 5 years ago (deosn't seem that long ago)
My wife hasn't had much practice videoing skiers, so it's kind of shakey
The run is a moderately steep (they call it a double black, but it would be a somewhat steep blue or easy black at a large western resort) bump run that flattens out at the bottom. The light is pretty flat, so it's hard to see the bumps.
The bumps are fairly good size on the steeper section, then small in the bottom flat section. The bumps were very irregular with no defined lines, much less a zipper line that lasted more than 2-3 bumps.
There is a pretty drastic double fall line that fall off to the skier's right.
Conditions are somewhat warm, late season, with about 6" of new snow earlier in the day that had been skied out quite a bit on a weekend day and turned pretty heavy.
Since this is from 5 years ago, the skis are longer. They are 186cm Dynastar Ski Cross 66 (Became the SC 10 the following year)

In viewing this, you'll see my skis get pushed around by the sloppy conditions a fair amount. In some cases banging together, and in other cases running apart. Other than that, I see this as okay skiing. Nothing spectacular, but not bad. It was just a fun run. I changed lines a few times, once to get around the guy in yellow, and other times just to look for better bumps.

Okay, enough.... here it is. Feel free to say what you want. I don't take criticism well, but I don't have a choice, do I?

http://media.putfile.com/jmh-bump1
no offense but this has nothing to do with bump skiing and it violates everything DiPiro's book talks about (hands stay back, don't move in the fall line, ...) . This looks more like carving in LARGE bumps and it I'd say it's even pseudo carving.
post #195 of 326
Dan DiPiro


Got your book--was very anxious to read it given the comments in this thread. Chapter by chapter I was waiting for that "secret" bit of advise you were holding back from this thread. Sorry---never found it. (I did appreciate the chapter on equipment). I have been working on my bumps for the past two years--and getting much better. There is not ONE thing in your book that has not been preached to me by my clinicians---All PSIA LIII, or East Alpine Team. The book definitely emphasises the important ideas---but again, nothing more than my teachers have been emphasising. Maybe they "got it" and you suceeded in changing PSIA. I have not been around long enough to know.
-------
Again---I believe everything in the book will help me be a better mogul skier. Its a good book. But nothing new. I was hoping some drills would be new. nope---drills are the same ones I used last and this year teaching moguls to my students. I am LII. Guess you can praise "some" instructors in the next revision, as getting it.
-----------
Bears---Amazon.com will save you 3-4 dollars shipping. I would have loved to patronize a fellow bear and buy direct, but 6.50 shipping was a bit much. Sorry.
post #196 of 326
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGaspar
Dan DiPiro


Got your book--was very anxious to read it given the comments in this thread. Chapter by chapter I was waiting for that "secret" bit of advise you were holding back from this thread. Sorry---never found it. (I did appreciate the chapter on equipment). I have been working on my bumps for the past two years--and getting much better. There is not ONE thing in your book that has not been preached to me by my clinicians---All PSIA LIII, or East Alpine Team. The book definitely emphasises the important ideas---but again, nothing more than my teachers have been emphasising. Maybe they "got it" and you suceeded in changing PSIA. I have not been around long enough to know.
-------
Again---I believe everything in the book will help me be a better mogul skier. Its a good book. But nothing new. I was hoping some drills would be new. nope---drills are the same ones I used last and this year teaching moguls to my students. I am LII. Guess you can praise "some" instructors in the next revision, as getting it.
-----------
Bears---Amazon.com will save you 3-4 dollars shipping. I would have loved to patronize a fellow bear and buy direct, but 6.50 shipping was a bit much. Sorry.
since the snow is almost gone, there's nothing left but to yap about skiing so here it goes..
I have started this thread out of need to find how to ski the moguls. I consider myself advanced carver and can handle steep terrain using advise from PMTS and Lito's books. Shorten the inside leg and miracles will happen. It does work well for me. This technique got me out of 'going nowhere' skiing.
Considering how I moved up in the skills using pmts it was hard for me to get into bumps. Unfortunately, neither Harb's nor Leto's book are clear on mogul skiing. Very vague and not applicable to kind of moguls we have on east coast.
Gave a chance Dan's book and BANG - things suddenly worked with simple set of exercises and hints. Again, I'm nowhere close to being comfy on Outer Limits but no longer panic on medium size mogul field. Wild Fire is suddenly fine and hope to get more of practice next season.
Maybe these ideas floated around , maybe not but having them in organized form and unambigous helped a lot! Again, for $10 it's priceless
post #197 of 326
Keram,

BTW - Thanks for posting the same question on the PMTS forum. There were some interesting responses. It was nice to see that you also found a tip here that worked for you.

BTW - I also found two other mogul threads that might be of interest:
foot speed
pmts and bumps

The contrasts between PMTS and Dan's approach are quite stark. The high rates of success reported by both approaches lead me to wonder if different mogul teaching techniques could be just as valid as different martial arts techniques?
post #198 of 326
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Keram,

BTW - Thanks for posting the same question on the PMTS forum. There were some interesting responses. It was nice to see that you also found a tip here that worked for you.

BTW - I also found two other mogul threads that might be of interest:
foot speed
pmts and bumps

The contrasts between PMTS and Dan's approach are quite stark. The high rates of success reported by both approaches lead me to wonder if different mogul teaching techniques could be just as valid as different martial arts techniques?
that's true, both have different philosopies. I've watched US Nationals @ Killington last weekend and have concluded that most if not all of the riders use pivot/steer method. I have not seen clear tip/transfer/etc (pmts) applied - unless it happened quickly.

For some reasons DiPiro method worked for me after few days of practicing whereas attempt to apply pmts failed for YEARS in moguls.
Don't get me wrong, I'd love to rail on groomed/ungroomed using PMTS and would not dare to do it any other way but moguls are best handled by DiPiro style - at least for me. I guess, I'll have two approaches and interestingly enough 'mogul' style of quick turns on flat skis works well on icy slopes which are not unusual where I ski.
I'm not fanatic of either methods so have no problem applying one or the other..
Oh, I ski on RX8 which is considered purely carving with all mountain inclination. It has aggresive sidecut (12m radius) and I was expecting rather lame results in the bumps but was surprised to see it work well.
I doubt I'd get mogul skis anytime soon but as long as I can advance on current ones same way I've moved up in ranks applying PMTS I'd be happy.
post #199 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
...

In viewing this, you'll see my skis get pushed around by the sloppy conditions a fair amount. In some cases banging together, and in other cases running apart. Other than that, I see this as okay skiing. Nothing spectacular, but not bad. It was just a fun run. I changed lines a few times, once to get around the guy in yellow, and other times just to look for better bumps...
Nice skiing. Your hips and knees never moved more than about 6 inches in relation to one another. I think we all find that what feels exaggerated to us while doing it does not look exaggerated on video, but basically you may want to try much, much more A&E even if you do want to take that round a line. One of the reasons you find zipperline bumps to be so jarring may be that you're simply not absorbing them at all.
post #200 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by keram
that's true, both have different philosopies. I've watched US Nationals @ Killington last weekend and have concluded that most if not all of the riders use pivot/steer method. I have not seen clear tip/transfer/etc (p m t s) applied - unless it happened quickly.

For some reasons DiPiro method worked for me after few days of practicing whereas attempt to apply p m t s failed for YEARS in moguls.
Don't get me wrong, I'd love to rail on groomed/ungroomed using PMTS and would not dare to do it any other way but moguls are best handled by DiPiro style - at least for me.
That's get to what I've been saying all along. There are situations where it is to our advantage to steer our feet. Bumps are one of those places. Tight trees and steeps are another. Therefore the application of P M T S is limited, which is fine, but I think folks should know there are situations where one should give up the ghost in order to be better skiers. I think both you and Dewd have made similar comments is seperate threads.

http://forums.epicski.com/showpost.p...85&postcount=8

Good on you two for making them.

L
post #201 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Keram,

BTW - Thanks for posting the same question on the PMTS forum. There were some interesting responses. It was nice to see that you also found a tip here that worked for you.
http://www.realskiers.com/pmtsforum/...pic.php?t=1032

The post Keram started on PMTS forum eventually ended with a post by SkierSynergy. It outlines a way which uses the techniques emphasized by PMTS; the weight transfer, edge engagement with LTE leading. Basically, it’s skiing moguls from top to top. One of the local ski areas teaches students and new instructors to ski bumps this way; top to top, with variations on the line and where you turn (top or near top). Couple of weeks ago, I saw an instructor (in training) making a phantom turn on the top, not sure what her coach called it.

Been skiing top to top for several years, the limitation I see is that it works on certain types of snow conditions, bump shapes, spacing and troughs. I have struggled with just using only footwork/edge techniques (along with preabsorption) when conditions and shapes dictate skiing the troughs in a zipperline. I don't want to get into a East versus West thing, but the trails in NE do get narrow with hard granular conditions. I look at the zipperline as an option, sometimes the only option.
post #202 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook
Nice skiing. Your hips and knees never moved more than about 6 inches in relation to one another. I think we all find that what feels exaggerated to us while doing it does not look exaggerated on video, but basically you may want to try much, much more A&E even if you do want to take that round a line. One of the reasons you find zipperline bumps to be so jarring may be that you're simply not absorbing them at all.
CTK,

My what good eyes you have, sir (or ma'am)!

I saw that too. I didn't want to make excuses, but jarring was an issue. That video was shot a few month after I herniated a disc at L4-L5. For the first couple of years, there was significant pain almost contantly. In certain positions, I could avoid the pain, so I tended to seek out those positions and stay there. The pain has been mostly gone for about 2 years now, so it took me a while to realize why I was skiing so gingerly.
post #203 of 326
Keram---I agree with your comment. This book is well worth the money. It does put useful skills/concepts into one easy to read volume. I guess my comment was....where is all the "your instructor will never tell you this"...coming from? My book says first published in August 2005. I am an LII and ever since I have asked for help in the bumps---the ideas expressed in this book have all been discussed---except for equipment.
post #204 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
...That video was shot a few month after I herniated a disc at L4-L5. For the first couple of years, there was significant pain almost contantly. In certain positions, I could avoid the pain, so I tended to seek out those positions and stay there...
The acute phase of herniated discs is an interesting thing. For a lot of people the disc pain leads to inhibition of the whole posterior chain (hams to lower back) and this definitely is then going to negatively impact your ability to do A&E. I'd bet touching your toes was rather difficult during this period, too?

Interestingly, in the advanced stages of rehabbing "athletic" backs a lot of people are using both squats and plyometrics, on up to depth jumps. Very similar to mogul skiing, actually. One of the points made by Dan in the book was that mogul skiing with good form is not hard on backs.

How to get good A&E back following an injury, or in the alternative how to build the movement pattern in someone who, as an adult, does not have it firmly ingrained already, could almost be another book, though. Although start small and work up probably sums it up well.
post #205 of 326

Banned from Harb's PMTS forum

Thought you guys and gals might be interested to know about my recent experience of being banned from Harald Harb's PMTS Web forum at realskiers.com.

On an Internet search, I found a thread on the forum discussing my book. I read the thread and found all sorts of misinterpretations of my teaching, several written by folks who hadn't even read the book! So, I joined in and tried to be cordial, explain my point of view, and clear up the misconceptions.

Apparently unfamiliar with the fundamentals of civil human discourse, Harb didn't delay in calling my teachings "ridiculous" and insisting that expert mogul skiers have nothing to share with the advanced skiing mainstream. In response, I didn't delay in pointing out to him that my book was outselling his on Amazon.com, and that some of you PMTS followers have enjoyed the book. I also challenged him to a friendly mogul skiing contest, an invitation that he quickly declined. Then he banned me from his site and erased my posts, leaving, however, a post in which one of his disciples calls me a "jackass."

There's one master instructor, I'd like to suggest to you, who is not open to ideas other than his own, but who is also unwilling to demonstrate that his superior instructing tone actually represents superior mogul skiing ability.

-Dan DiPiro
post #206 of 326

Wow

Dan ...I just read that stuff over a Real Skiers this morning...I'm amazed that the posts were taken down.

I found nothing inflamatory in them and your info was (to me) accurate. It wasn't in keeping with the Harb concept though...

I find that amazing.
post #207 of 326
hard had like 5 posts today on that thread. Something was touching his nerve. And then he deleted all the posts from Dan, and locked the thread.
post #208 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by agent.5
hard had like 5 posts today on that thread. Something was touching his nerve. And then he deleted all the posts from Dan, and locked the thread.
Yes, agent.5. I just saw that fifth post of Harb's in which he gives me and mogul skiing technique a real whupin'. A nerve, yes.

-Dan D
post #209 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie

I find that amazing.
Be honestly, I don't know what is the deal with Harald. Is he such an ******* in real life too? I am actually a PMTS follower and is planning on attending one of his clinics. But I may not want to deal with him if he is going to be such an ass.
post #210 of 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by agent.5
I am actually a PMTS follower and is planning on attending one of his clinics. But I may not want to deal with him if he is going to be such an ass.
Unfortunately I didn't see Dan's posts so I don't know what was said. As far as working with Harald on the hill see this post for a brief description of some time I spent with him.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=40484

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan DiPiro
I also challenged him to a friendly mogul skiing contest
heh...that would have been interesting...HH is 55+ and he can rip the bumps. As has been discussed at length there are various approches to skiing the bumps. The zipperline is just one of them. I prefer the carving style used by HH (and other racers I know) which is a combination of carving and A/E. The line is still very tight but its up and over the bumps rather than in the trough. It just looks so darn cool when executed well. Different strokes for different folks.
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