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Speaking of injuries: How NOT to end your season.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Saw the comments here on recent ski injuries (and deaths) and thought I'd point out my own experience.

My season came to a bit of an undesired ending recently. Hopefully
yours continues on for quite some time yet.

I posted all the details on my blog including comments about
Tremblant. It's at:

http://www.pcserenity.com

The title, appropriately enough is, "Break a Leg!"
post #2 of 17
:

Too late!! Already ended my season 2/1 with a torn ACL.....interesting & powerful blog entry you made.....I can relate to the "that's not right" feeling as well as the "not quite sure what happened" feeling.....

Heal well!!
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
One oddity is that the clinic told me that something like 1 out of every 2,000 skiers ends up with a noteworthy injury. That seems ludicrously high. Is that really possible?
post #4 of 17
Just out of curiosity, what bindings were you using?
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Markers. M1000's. Not exactly great stuff but they had been serving me well.
post #6 of 17
Got any of that hypomorphone syuff left you don't want? j/k
post #7 of 17
The friend I ski with just shattered his shoulder into 5 pieces, and went through surgery down in Salt Lake last week. Now he has screws and plates holding everything together with his arm in a sling for a few more weeks. The funny thing is, that he wasnt even on a run when it happened. That's what he gets for not calling "On your left!" when he tried to pass someone!
post #8 of 17
Wow, that's quite an experience, sorry to hear about it. Knowing what you do, what do you think was the ultimate cause of the injury and what would you do differently next time?
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterK
Got any of that hypomorphone syuff left you don't want? j/k
I wouldn't risk the jail time but I actually thought of that. I ended up with like 60 extra pills and thought, "Wow, I could probably pay for all my injury bills with this." It's a pity that I can't sell them back to the drug store or something. <grin>
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219
Wow, that's quite an experience, sorry to hear about it. Knowing what you do, what do you think was the ultimate cause of the injury and what would you do differently next time?
I'm guessing on the exact causes. I THINK my left ski simply managed to catch and lock up on the right ski. I THINK I may have actually engaged at least part of the binding on my second attempt to get back into the ski. With the skis locked, I then instantly lost control and the left ski went under or over the right ski and took my foot with it. Either that or my foot just somehow caught in the snow which seems unlikely to me.

Next time I think I'd just go for a nice second-base slide. Hit the ground more on my terms.

On surprising injuries, just two weeks before this, my friend Dave's ex-wife, an expert skier, tore up her shoulder terribly at Camelback on a green run just warming up. She was on a totally flat section going straight and suddenly got thrown into the ground. I guess we just have to accept that God didn't intend humans to attack sticks to their legs and slide around on snow. <grin>
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agrajag
On surprising injuries, just two weeks before this, my friend Dave's ex-wife, an expert skier, tore up her shoulder terribly at Camelback on a green run just warming up. She was on a totally flat section going straight and suddenly got thrown into the ground. I guess we just have to accept that God didn't intend humans to attack sticks to their legs and slide around on snow. <grin>

I have at least 2-3 low-speed "what the heck?" crashes per season (haven't had a serious high speed crash in years, knock on wood). A couple weeks ago, I had 2 in one day. One, I was skating through the lift line and the next thing I know I am kneeling on the right knee (which hit the snow pretty hard). Look around and my right ski is about 5 feet back. Did hear a pop when the binding released. Best I can figure is that the ski got hung up on something when it was angled, and I rotated out of the binding. Those low speed releases are strange.

Other one, later in the day -- I was coming down to the lift and did one last turn and pole plant. Somehow managed to ski over my right pole basket with the right ski. Normally this is not a big deal -- the ski slides over. In this case, the ski stopped cold and spun around the pole. Nex thing I know I am on my ass looking uphill. Huh?

I can only thank my lucky stars that most of my crashes are low-speed and due to moronic reasons....
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agrajag
One oddity is that the clinic told me that something like 1 out of every 2,000 skiers ends up with a noteworthy injury. That seems ludicrously high. Is that really possible?
After all the posts here and on other forums over the past few years as well as the "noteworthy injury" (head to a tree with brain surgery that followed just over a month ago) it doesn't really surprise me. I'm assuming that the number you've quoted is within the skiers lifetime and not annually.
post #13 of 17
Good Luck with the recovery, it sounds as if you have the right attitude for a great outcome!
post #14 of 17
wrong post
post #15 of 17
Agrajag, so sorry to hear of your misfortune. I hope you'll get better soon!

I knew the Canadians had a great health system! It was good to hear that you were taken care of well. It could be scary to be on a foreign soil, to be in ill health. I'm glad you had a great group of people around you, and that you were able to get together with your travelling companions in a short period of time.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
I can't imagine how scary the whole thing would have been had I been basically alone on the mountain and having to go through all that with complete strangers. Having people I knew there really helped.

I just go re-casted yesterday and it's driving me nuts. I'd just gotten to where the old cast was acceptably comfortable. This new one takes away most of the give I had in the old one (mainly due to muscle atrophy) so it's entirely uncomfortable now. Couldn't sleep at all well last night.

The good news is that I have another appointment on the 20th when they said it would be time to re-cast once more (this was essentially a clean-up after having cut the original cast to allow for some swelling) and, if all heals well, they'll cut it down to below the knee. I've got my fingers crossed for that one.
post #17 of 17
Agrajg - I'm sorry to hear about your injury; I wish you a speedy recovery. However, as a physician I must take strong exception to your swipes at healthcare in the US.

1) You say "...unlike America, all details of this sort of thing [payment] were left for after my medical needs were dealt with". I've worked in many hospitals during medical school, internship, residency, and private practice, I've never seen a patient with urgent or emergent needs who was forced to provide insurance information or money/credit card prior to receiving treatment. Obviously patients who present to the ER with non-urgent needs, and who have no means to pay, will be sent to the county hospital or local teaching hospital. However, you must remember, those institutions are reimbursed for this, the physicians in private practice are not.

2) You say "Canadians are clearly doing something right up there with regard to healthcare". How do you explain all the Canadians who voluntarily come to the US and pay out-of-pocket for their healthcare?

3.) You say "... the entire thing came to $600 Canadian or about $450 US". Someone had to pay the rest, I guarantee it.

Hope your leg heals well and you don't need an IM rod.
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