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Rossi B2 or B3 opinions as season matures

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Has anyone had enough days on the new B2 and/or B3 to give us a good overview -- ice, crud, deep powder, trees, groomers, bumps, etc? I don't know that I have seen anything of late from someone who is now very familiar with the ski in all conditions. Also, anyone who has say 75-100 days on it: any sign of fatigue in the ski? Thanks.
post #2 of 25
I have a 2006 Rossi B2 in the 174 cm length. I'm skiing them with a pair of Atomic Neox 310 bindings. I have 5 days on them so far here in New England.

The ski is the best I've been on for all mountain skiing here. Obviously, no deep powder out here though, so I'm not sure how they'd be in that stuff. But, for hardpack, soft snow, crud, 12 inches of powder, etc., the skis have been great.

They are very stable, pretty quick, light, foregiving, and exhibit no chatter at speed. I'd describe them as a softer flex front to rear with a lot of tortional stiffness.

Overall, great ski and no complaints. I've seen some folks on the B3s out here and the ones I've talked to like them a lot too.

Hope this helps.
post #3 of 25
I have found the B3's to be one of the best all mountain skis for Whistler mountain. They have enough shape that they carve well enough on the groomed runs but they are plenty wide for all the soft snow we have received this year. Both the B2 and B3 skis have held up well after many days on the mountain.
There are no changes for next year's B2 or B3 so take advantage of the sales prices now so you don't get caught paying full retail next year.
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
I am a little disappointed in the response here. Surely, there are B2 and B3 riders out there with evolved opinions. And, no I don't need another ad directing me where to buy skis.

Just picked up a pair of brand new K2 Axis Mod X on EBay the other day for $150. Nice ski, great price.
post #5 of 25
Didn't respond because you already know I own both skis and think both are the best for me. Been skiing the Bandit series for years with nothing but the best performance.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Lars: Actually, my visits to this site are irregular, so I did not catch this is Your Ski. But, can you address a couple of the things that people give the Bandit series demerits for?

1. Edge grip
2. Low top end for speed
3. Foam core means no power through crud
4. Foam core means the ski loses it after XX days.

I demoed both skis and loved the B3 for the conditions that day: lots of heavy Sierra slop with some nicer powder here and there.
post #7 of 25
Bill
I've skied my 168cm B3s (2006) through approx 60 days. They're still running strong and are not 'losing it.' I beat the crap out of these skis and they can take my abuse.

Great edge grip, bashes the crud just fine, excellent in reasonably deep pow (anything 12" or less) - simply a phenomenal all mtn ski. I agree with the complaint about top end speed. I can rip it up on hardpack, but still not as quick as the GS carver crew. For me, it is the One Ski Quiver - however, I am considering getting a big pow ski for next year to add to the collection.
post #8 of 25
I have the 2006 B2 in a 174 length.

1. Edge grip (No issues. Really great grip).

2. Low top end for speed (Pretty subjective. I ski fast but not at race GS speeds. No chatter noticed. The new plate in the nose "shark tip" seems to work).

3. Foam core means no power through crud (I've been in plenty of crud here in the East. Zero problems. The ski plows through it although it is a light ski and can get deflected a bit).

4. Foam core means the ski loses it after XX days. (Don't have enough days yet but it's the cap that supports the ski, not the foam. I think the issue is overstated).
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam
Lars: Actually, my visits to this site are irregular, so I did not catch this is Your Ski. But, can you address a couple of the things that people give the Bandit series demerits for?

1. Edge grip
2. Low top end for speed
3. Foam core means no power through crud
4. Foam core means the ski loses it after XX days.

I demoed both skis and loved the B3 for the conditions that day: lots of heavy Sierra slop with some nicer powder here and there.
1. I can lay this ski on edge and hold an arch in anything other than bullit proof ice.

2. I haven't exceeded this skis speed limit yet and it doesn't chatter your teeth loose either.

3. I'm gonna address the Foam Core issue. There was a time many years ago when I sold skis that I bashed the hell out of Foam Core Rossignols. I was selling Head, Atomic and Volant at the time along with RD and Blizzard. Never skied one but bashed it because all the skis I sold were wood core. To me that meant solid, more durable etc. Then a friend of mine went to work at a competitors ski shop where they sold Rossignols. He kept bugging me to demo the new 4S as it was so awesome. well, I finally got the chance to try one, Foam Core and all. That was over 20 years ago and I've been skiing Rossi's almost exclusively ever since. The fact is, I've never had a warranty problem or edge problem in all those years. Never bent one, never broken one and never had one feel like it was overskied. I've got a XXin the garage with 200 plus days on them and they are still good shape. I'm on the same pair of B2's I've skied for the past three years and they are still my ski of choice.

I'd say you couldn't make a better choice.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam
Lars: Actually, my visits to this site are irregular, so I did not catch this is Your Ski. But, can you address a couple of the things that people give the Bandit series demerits for?

1. Edge grip
2. Low top end for speed
3. Foam core means no power through crud
4. Foam core means the ski loses it after XX days.

I demoed both skis and loved the B3 for the conditions that day: lots of heavy Sierra slop with some nicer powder here and there.
all 4 are subjective assessments standing alone.

compare any Rossi Bandit/B Series to a Stockli or other similar burly "asleep until 35-40mph" ski and all 4 will be demerits on the Rossi tally sheet... except B Squads that is.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
all 4 are subjective assessments standing alone.

compare any Rossi Bandit/B Series to a Stockli or other similar burly "asleep until 35-40mph" ski and all 4 will be demerits on the Rossi tally sheet... except B Squads that is.
Comparing them to Stockli wasn't in the question UC.

There's no doubt that the Stockli is the Sherman Tank in the ski industry.

We are all different and we all have different likes and feels. Not everyone likes the rebound effect some skis give. Just as many people don't like the dampness feeling of the Rossignol VAS. Me, I like them mostly because they don't chatter all over the place. I like the sound of silence when I ski. It's a no brainer ski that is easy to ski in all conditions. Call me lazy call me whatever but those are my likes. Just because I ski Rossignols by no means diminishes my capacity to ski anything and everything that lies out there in skidome. I'd be just as much at home on a K2 Seth Vicious or a Dynastar8800 or a Elan 777. The question about the Rossi durability is also a misnomer. As I said, they will withstand a beating.
post #12 of 25
but Lars he asked for people to comment on the 4 demerit points... and I was pointing out that where you stand on each point depends on where you start.

lifelong race stock skiers would find all 4 areas to be demerits.

lifelong beginner ski skiers would find all 4 areas to be where the Bandit/B series are vastly superior tools.

most people fall between the two. whether Billiam should be concerned about all 4 demerit points? I'd say not, unless he's actually seeking a Stockli or race room build ski.

and Lars it's not about you or anyone who rides a Bandit or B series ski. it's about comparative flex and construction. plenty of rippers are on softer skis that aren't like Stocklis. they choose those skis. they have their reasons. that's good enough for them which is good enough for me.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars
The question about the Rossi durability is also a misnomer. As I said, they will withstand a beating.
Demoed a pair of B3's on a powder day so I can't speak to edge grip, no issues with speed...they cranked. Floatation was excellent. Durability...I cracked the ski in half after a low speed collision with a tree...:

Other than that I really liked them...sure glad I bought the $2.00 insurance though!
post #14 of 25
I demo'd the 174 cm B2's 3 weeks ago while skiing Vail and A-Basin. I really enjoyed their quick turns through the bumps and steeper terrain, alleys, etc. and ended up buying them at Vail Ski Tech. Overall, very impressive ski, holds edge very well. I had no issues with speed , they really can crank it up. They are a "soft" ski, you can really get alot of energy from them.

I just returned from another week of great Colorado skiing at Keystone, Beaver Creek and of course Vail, the conditions overall were very good with some intermediate terrain skied off and the edging control was very good.

I previously was skiing K2 Merlin IV and the B2's blow them away. I did not demo any other equipment so I cannot compare them to anything else.

Overall, I am very happy with their performance.
post #15 of 25
I demoed both the B-2 and B-3 quite a bit this year because I used to ski Rossi's exclusively (2S/G through 7S/G), loved the old feel before they got too floppy, wanted to try the new shovels out.

Of the two, preferred the B-3. Damp but great snow feel, surprising grip on crust, quicker than I thought they'd be at 176, even through big bumps. Busted through steep backside crud like it wasn't there. Decently high speed limit. Very light for 83 mm. Very easy on the legs. Not much pop out of a turn, like all B's, and will never beat a German-Austrian ski of comparable width at carving groomed. Might yet end up with one for AT backside setup.

My battered demos with mucho miles still seemed taut. Agree with others that foam core has noth'n to do with noth'n, in terms of durability. Rossi's been making caps forever. They know their stuff.

B-2 was more like great vanilla ice cream; each time I tried it, surprised how easy it went down, but ended up wanting a little more edge, both figuratively and literally. Not a great ski on ice or hard crud, and oddly slow-feeling edge to edge in my length (174).

Actually far preferred the Z-9 in 170 to the 174 B-2. More stabile on terrible surfaces, quicker, smoother, higher speed limit and more energy (metal helps). Not as much snow feel, not as light, different but tossup in bumps. Higher fun factor making arcs of all sizes. Think about them if you want the trademark Rossi dampness but more carve.
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
I asked about the foam core because the beloved Salomon Super Force 9 2S's completely lost it one day (would not hold an edge) and after two tune-ups, two different ski shops (good ones in Salt Lake City) told me the foam core gave up the ghost. So, I am shy about buying a foam core ski since that day and have been on a Volkl and a Salomon wood core ski since.

But, my 4 runs on the new B3 in super-tough snow were marvelous. It cut through the mashed potatoes like a good German chef knife through raw filet mignon. It surfed the deep stuff like a good O'Neil 7 foot board at Steamer's on an 8-foot day. And it was easy to keep my feet together and make big GS turns at high speeds like a Porsche 911 on Highway One at the Little Sur River curve. I was wondering if my impressions, now 2 years old, were correct. And, there was no icey or hardpack conditions to test that day. Hence, my questions. And, I appreciate the input so far.
post #17 of 25
Oh my God Billiam, don't ever mention thatyou keep your feet together here. You'll get crucified, don't you know that. Obviously from some other posts here, they will also think because you really like them, you must be a lifelong beginner skier.
post #18 of 25
Gee, where does that put me?
post #19 of 25
Have to agree with Lars: Serious anti-Rossi bias around here. Lot of our hairy-chested ex-racers think French skis are for girlie-men. OTOH, Rossi earned a certain amount of this scorn for dumbing down their X-Bandits. But for an alternative view, go read reviews in Canadian or Euro sources like Ski Press World, Ski Reviews UK, or Ski Canada - they LOVE Rossi's, year in and year out. My impression talking to instructors up in Canada, too.
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
Amen. When I say feet together, I mean pretty close together, to get that surfing feeling that is so fun in powder. Of course, I have been told and read about keeping your feet more apart with the newer skis, in a more "atheletic position". I say poppycock. These new skis (the last 5 years) are so easy to ski that you can have your feet about anywhere and they work! I do work hold my feet more shoulder width apart these days and I find it is a bit less tiring, so that a good thing..

BTW, I am a solid level 8 skier and am 9 on some days. Skied all of Alta and Snowbird but I don't jump off cliffs (cuz I am now 54 years old), so I would think that admitting I keep my feet together on some runs that I would not be crucified. However, defending a Bandit or Pocket Rocket could get you strung up on some days at this site. Just kidding, of course, but the German/Austrian bias is pretty strong amongst some folks.
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
BTW, the reason I was asking about the B2 and B3 is that I am in the market for new skis. Since I had such a great ride on the B3 last spring, I wanted to hear from those who let it into their quiver. As many do, I have been seeking the perfect all-mountain, do-anything ski. Realizing there are tradeoffs in whatever you choose, I went this route: I just bought a pair of 2004 K2 Axis X (181) to be my everyday ski, as I demoed it for a day at Squaw and loved it for many reasons (edge grip on spring ice, very good bump ski, chatter only if I went really fast, etc). So now, I am looking for a powder/crud ski. However, I need that ski to be able to ski bumps, not chatter my teeth out of my head on hardpack, and be quick in the trees, as that is where the powder lies as the day unwinds.

The skis that I like so far are: Atomic Sugar Daddy, Salomon Pocket Rocket, Dynastar 8800, and the B3 (I have not tried the B4). There may not be enough difference (in width) between the Axis X and the B3 to make it worth the investment, but the B3 is so versatile and easy to ski, I am tempted. That is why I am interested in it's performance in crud, as I find that to be my biggest challenge.
post #22 of 25
When evaluating a ski in crud, keep in mind that it makes a difference whether you ski the entire ski, as I do, or only the back third, as most do. Skiing way back puts little weight on the tips, so they go everywhere at once in crud. I skied a foot of light crud on China Bowl at Vail today with my Bandit B2s, which tracked like a train. I have not tried them in heavy wet crud, as it has yet to arrive in Colorado.
post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 
Crudmeister: you are so right. When I ski behind instructors or true experts and I see how easy they make nasty crud-skiing look, when I ask them or watch closely, that is exactly what they are doing -- turn initiation and balance that uses the whole ski. 90% of skiers are tentative in bad snow, and that sometimes includes me. The right tool will help a little, hence my search.

But, I will not forget: "Its' a poor craftsman who blames his tools." A friend told me that one day when we were skiing an epic powder day at Aspen Highlands and I was struggling.
post #24 of 25
I just got back from CO and demoed the B2's in a 166 at Keystone. I tried to get the AC3 or 8000 one of the days for direct comparison, but they didn't have it in a 163/165. I'm 5'5" 170lbs, Level 6-7 skier, 40yr. I skied the AC3's in UT at the end of January and the 8000's last year. Subjectively, the B2's immediately seemed light under my feet. They were very easy to ski, initiated turns easily, and carved well on fresh morning groomers, slushier afternoon snow, and general chop and crud. Not much of what I skiied seemed to upset them. The ski was very stable and relatively quiet. I cranked them up (for me) and never got any chatter which I did get on the 8000. The conditions were generally OK and these skis were a blast. Realskiers shows them as 20-Race speeds only. I went out with beginners and when I'd check in on them I didn't notice the ski particularly hard to ski at slow speeds, certainly no more so than the AC3. I recall the 8000 for example as being more difficult to ski slowly. I really liked this ski. I do wish I could have compared it more directly to the AC3 and or 8000. But I was out to have fun, not buy a ski, so I didn't press on checking back as often as I could have.
post #25 of 25

B3 review

I just purchased a pair of 2005 B3 168cm (122-94-112). I traded them for 2006 Salomon Foils. I skied them only one day in slush and hardpack but I am very impressed. Soft, great edge hold, very forgiving and fun. They handled the hardpack and moguls very well. I had planned on using these as powder skis but they seem to do it all. What a score!!! These are great. Im really looking forward to trying them in powder.

BTW: I had tried 2006 B3 a month ago. Nice ski. As damp as the 2005 B3 but stiffer lateraly. I like the more plush ride of the old B3. My favorite other skis are the Volant Powerkarve and Chubb (pre Atomic).

Anti Salomon Soapbox
The Salomon foil is advertised to be the Pocket Rocket replacement (the Gun is the actual replacement but the foil offers more sidecut. I tried both skis and found the Foil softer.) I dont know how these can be considered soft in comparison to the B3's. The B3 (especially the 2005) is an order of maginitude more damp and soft than the Salomon skis. The B3's are a far more enjoyable ride. I have been trying Salomon skis for years at every opportunity to keep my views objective. I have come to the conclusion that Salomon skis suck. All I buy for them is binding (they dont suck).
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