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Soft vs Pop Park Skis

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
So I've skied the season on a pair of Line Chronics and enjoyed them all over the mountain and in the park. My question lies in the major difference between this ski and say the K2 Fujative. Are soft skis better than stiff/springy skis in the park? Particularly for landings?

I notice that the chronics are great for popping and ollies, but are not great for buttering. How does a ski's pop or softness affect hits in the park?
post #2 of 18
whats buttering?
post #3 of 18
Like a manual on a skateboard. They look cool.
post #4 of 18
whats a manuel on a skateboard
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
whats a manuel on a skateboard
riding on the front wheels only.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
When you see guys riding on just the tips or tails and the rest of the ski is bent in the air. Pros can hop from tip to tail with 180s and shit and hold the manual.

Ok, now that we've explained buttering... anyone have comments on the original thread???
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kptwohig
So I've skied the season on a pair of Line Chronics and enjoyed them all over the mountain and in the park. My question lies in the major difference between this ski and say the K2 Fujative. Are soft skis better than stiff/springy skis in the park? Particularly for landings?

I notice that the chronics are great for popping and ollies, but are not great for buttering. How does a ski's pop or softness affect hits in the park?
well, i would guess that soft skis allow for better flex, hence better at buttering and gives more pop for ollie. And also better for landings.


other then that i dunno. most of the guys on these forums are grandpas so they dont know what the heck youre talking about. try newschoolers.com
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kptwohig
So I've skied the season on a pair of Line Chronics and enjoyed them all over the mountain and in the park. My question lies in the major difference between this ski and say the K2 Fujative. Are soft skis better than stiff/springy skis in the park? Particularly for landings?

I notice that the chronics are great for popping and ollies, but are not great for buttering. How does a ski's pop or softness affect hits in the park?
Something to keep in mind is that many skis that are designed for buttering are designed with multiple flex points and patterns. Often times, park skis that are designed to butter have a softer flexing point in front of the toe peice and a softer flexing point behind the heel peice. They will also have a general flex pattern centered around the boot.

Now with stiffer park skis, you can still butter, you just have to do it right. Similarly, if you use skis designed to butter, you can take advantage of those other flex points to get a little "snap" or pop out of the skis to ollie.

In terms of landing, a more butter oriented ski will be less forgiving to landing in the backseat, whereas a stiffer ski will allow you a bit more room for error.

More than anything, its just a matter of preferance when it comes to stiffer or softer (butter oriented) park skis.
post #9 of 18
another thing to mention is that softer park skis will also typically have a little less edge grip in the pipe, but be more forgiving on the take off of a jump.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
other then that i dunno. most of the guys on these forums are grandpas so they dont know what the heck youre talking about. try newschoolers.com
Speak for yourself
post #11 of 18
Anyone who doesn't know what buttering is doesn't get to make fun of other peoples' ski knowledge.


A lot of the jib oriented skis (called butter skis in this thread) have a stiff section underfoot with a very (and I mean VERY) soft section fore and aft. These include the K2 Fujative and Line Steele Spence pro model from a few years ago. They're halfway decent, but they really don't have the flex for all mountain use and don't have the pop of other twins. I'd really only look into them if you're getting a deal on them or you plan on doing a lot of jibbing in the park or in urban settings.
post #12 of 18
In the course of reading this thread, I have learned three new terms: buttering, "manualing" a skateboard, and "ollies". Still not sure what an "ollie" is. I knew I was "out of it" with regards to the pipe & park crowd (and a great many other crowds as well..), but I didn't realize how far in the dark I really am until now.

:

Edit: ah-ha! An ollie. http://www.ehow.com/how_10598_ollie-snowboard.html
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the help. I'm a really not considering the fujative, but wondering how it stacked up to my Chronics. I like the stiff ski, and will contest that I get plenty of ollie power becase of the stiffness. I'm 205 without gear so it seams that a soft ski wouldn't support me leaning back much.

I'm more concerned about landings and I think that got answered. Consensus seems to be that stiffer skis are more forgiving for landing (though maybe not for landing switch???).
post #14 of 18
If you land switch too far forward (on the nose) on a soft ski it will bend a lot (e.g. butter) making it harder to recover.

I'm also ~205 pounds I would suggest Volkl Karma, K2 PE, Head Mojo 80/90 and maybe Stocklis park ski if you can find it (Snake I think). Fuja will be way too soft for your size.
post #15 of 18
The Steele Spence model mentioned above was not a Line ski, but 4FRNT. If you look into the smaller companies such as 4FRNT and Armada, you'd probably want to look at the 4FRNT MSP (Matt Sterbens' model) or Armada ARV (all mountain-big mountain oriented twin), and possibly, if you can try em next year, check out the Liberty KGB (I got to ski it at the Copper Trade show and its a stiff all-mountain twin that definately surprised me, as did the whole Liberty line-up).
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manus
The Steele Spence model mentioned above was not a Line ski, but 4FRNT. If you look into the smaller companies such as 4FRNT and Armada, you'd probably want to look at the 4FRNT MSP (Matt Sterbens' model) or Armada ARV (all mountain-big mountain oriented twin), and possibly, if you can try em next year, check out the Liberty KGB (I got to ski it at the Copper Trade show and its a stiff all-mountain twin that definately surprised me, as did the whole Liberty line-up).

Line made the Steele Spence pro model with the butter flex before 4FRNT even existed.
post #17 of 18
4FRNT STLs are going to be too soft for 200+ pounds in my opinion.
post #18 of 18
...High Jack!....
Armada ARV or Line Prophet 100s for Vt trees, quiver, 240#, expert. 185cm. Reasonable choice? Durability?
Thx.
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