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Gym help. I need a routine.

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
here is the deal. I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. My wife and I signed up with a gym that is waling distance from teh house, Golds Gym. For the past 2 weeks I have been there every day but two, because it works well with my schedule. I can get there an hour at a time so I would like a ski specific routine for strength and weight loss. I am up to 200 and I would like to get down to 180 for my frame. I ahve been doing cardio on the elyptical and also on the stepper plus crunches too. Let me know what machies and reps I should be doing to fill my hour. I want to leave nice and sweaty at the end of it.
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
here is the deal. I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. My wife and I signed up with a gym that is waling distance from teh house, Golds Gym. For the past 2 weeks I have been there every day but two, because it works well with my schedule. I can get there an hour at a time so I would like a ski specific routine for strength and weight loss. I am up to 200 and I would like to get down to 180 for my frame. I ahve been doing cardio on the elyptical and also on the stepper plus crunches too. Let me know what machies and reps I should be doing to fill my hour. I want to leave nice and sweaty at the end of it.
No simple answer, Phil; a lot depends on finding exercises that work for you, where work for you means you'll keep at it. There's an endorsement for mixing things up.

Personally, I love the bike. No traffic, no stops, and I can keep my heart rate up without the pounding my legs got during my running days back in my 20's and early 30's. If you've never done it, or done it kind of haphazardly, try getting on the bike, going for half an hour. Keep the RPM's in the 85 range, maybe 90, but start at mid-80-ish until you get used to it. When I'm riding, I'll move up a "gear" when I'm moving into the 95 RPM range, then keeping it at least 85 RPM's, and so on, moving up a gear as the RPM's again reach the mid-90's. I'm using the first 10-12 minutes warming up to the next segment, in which I go pretty hard for at least 40 minutes, then cool down for 10-12 minutes before calling it a ride.

Don't get ahead of yourself though. Familiarize yourself with the machine and how it feels. Get a feeling for what a FULL pedal-stroke is.

If I say anymore, I've said too much.

As I said, my legs stay very strong and the lungs and heart benefit, and I'm not pounding my knees and ankles with the running (though I'll toss in a slow, uphill 40-minute slog on the treadmill once a month or so).

For power I do leg presses and hamstring curls on my leg day. Ask someone at the gym - I'm also a Golds member - about the machines and proper movements. Or ask here again if it interests you. Leg press rather than squats because I get a better stretch and they are friendlier to my knees than squats. I simply find them much more user-friendly, and they produce results.

I do calf raises on my bike days, right after the ride.

Crunches on the machine two, three times a week. Keeps the core strong and your lower back will thank you.

This is a start; there's plenty more. You didn't mention looking for upper body strength so I'll leave that alone. But bench presses are great for basic strength upkeep and hitting the back here and there comes in handy for that poling across the occassional interminable flat section. Start with a weight with which you can do 10-12 reps and do three or four sets with that weight. As you progress, you may start adding a bit of weight for each set, but that's down the road. Right now you just want to get your body accustomed to lifting and doing it with good form.
If growing your "guns" interests you, arm curls will hit the biceps.

Take a look at the bike. TONS of world cup skiers live on the damn thing, for a good reason. If you get into it, your skiing will really step up; not just because you're stronger and have more wind, but because of increased confidence in your instrument.

Last, DO NOT OBSESS about the readings on the scale. Want to lose weight? Fine, but know that it WILL come off. Get in touch with how you FEEL; it's more important in the context of your question than how much you weigh.

If you're serious, you'll need to address whatever dietary issues that may exist. Love the sodas? Gotta cut 'em out or at least way back.

Just get used to the routine of making the gym a part of your life; don't apply too much performance pressure. Showing up is a great start; the rest may well take care of itself. (It's the showing up part that tends to be the big obstacle.)

Last, don't underestimate the benefits of good, brisk walks, keeping the tempo up. Great for burning calories; good, too, for the mind.
post #3 of 26
Phil, you going to skate this year?

EDIT: check the link in BigE's sig.
post #4 of 26
Phil,

For the price of one all-day private lesson, you can buy about 10 hours of personal training at the gym. If you get a trainer with solid certifications and a good personality they can design a great routine for you. You can even set it up so that you meet with them once a week and then repeat their program two more times on your own.

My personal favorite for cardio is spinning. It takes about 10 solid sessions to get the routine and build some stamina -- so, don't give up. It's an amazing cardio and muscular workout.

Last note, you don't necessarily need a lot of weight ... using your own body weight as resistance is a fabulous thing.

good luck,
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
My personal favorite for cardio is spinning. It takes about 10 solid sessions to get the routine and build some stamina -- so, don't give up. It's an amazing cardio and muscular workout.
Agreed. Once you're in the routine, it's great. A good instructor will keep it interesting and give you a more balanced workout than just getting on a bike and slogging through while you watch CNN. Added benefit is when you've got a spin classe at set times you've got a commitment to keep.
post #6 of 26
Our Gold's has a standing offer for a free session with one of the personal trainers. I found out about it by accident. I was sitting out front waiting for my wife to finish her workout and struck up a conversation with one of the trainers who was waiting for a client. She told me about the program and I made an appointment to meet with her. We went through a questionaire about health and exercise history, fitness goals, etc. She did a body composition analysis using a caliper. Afterwards, she recommended an exercise program that made good sense for me (focused on core strength and balance) with lots of tips for proper form and such.

I think they use the program to sell personal training. I didn't bite but I found her suggestions to be very worthwhile.

You might check to see if they have a similar program in your club too.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. a ski specific routine for strength and weight loss. I am up to 200 and I would like to get down to 180 for my frame.
If your goal is weight loss and strength,you need to focus on weights.
Weight lifting will burn more calores,increase your metabolisim and build the muscle that cardio will not.You still need the cardio ,but that should not be the focus.
Also focus on full body lifts,the more musles you engage with each lift the better.
If your doing squats why not do a few sets,with less weight, of squats with an over head press. Every part of your body gets hit in one move.
Dumbell Lunges with Lateral Fly is another.
Also Core workouts are a must. When you start losing some weight and have some core strength you need to move beyond crunches.
Twisting ,turning functional core movements,anything that uses the core in a realistic plain of athletic movment.
Alot of this can be done at the high/low cable.
Woodchops,reverse woodchops,straight arm pull down,bosu ball one arm chest press.
You could spend a full hour just on all the diffferent core ,balance movments. Not that you should,but there are so many choices.
Also get to know the Swiss Ball,Bosu Ball,and any balance equipment your gym has.
Cardio ,if you go hard 3 times a week thats probably good,Some may disagree,but your body tends to adapt to cardio very well.
So the more you do the easier it gets.The easier it gets the more you have to do,the longer it takes.
Try to stick with interval's . Go hard for a minute than rest for a min. Most bikes have those workouts in there program.
And keep changing ,Bike ,Eliptical,Treadmill,Rower,Stair Master,Recumbent Bike,Jump Rope.
I'm sure I'm leaving something out ,hope this helps.

.
post #8 of 26
I like loboski's first sentence, regarding dealing with weights. avoid the bells-and-whistle disco-bondage dog-and-pony show.
I 'm not big on the idea of incorporating more muscle groups into each exercise. you wanna get strong and big?
you need to isolate muscles so as not to deplte all your available glycogen
by hitting many muscle sat once with less-than full concentration and resistance.
further, combining the movements leads to less-than-strict form, which causes injuries.
work muscle groups independantly. squats are your friend: not onloy do they work, directly, the main groups we use in skiing and boarding, buuuuuuttt:
squats work the largets muscles in our bodies (quads and glutes), thereby giving us the greatest anabolic 'burts' of hormones with each set. further, the bigger muscle, heavy-weight work burns less glycogen than the ligter-weight, higher-rep stuff. it takes more effort, but it burns less glycogen.
therefore, you want to start with squats, then leg extensions, maybe bench, then do curls, mil. presses, crunches, etc.

you best bet is an NFL-style workout utilizing 'push' days and 'pull' days, and eventually also upper/lower body days.
on push days you do eccentric work (that where you're opening the angles of the muscle vector...like pushing your hands AWAY from your shoulders, chest, etc.) such as bench, mil. press, squat, leg extension,
and on pull (bringing your hands to your shoulders, etc.) days you perform lat pulls (behind the head, if that's cool with your AC joints), seated lat pulls, curls, crunches, thigh-bicep (hamstring) curls and crunches.

work out only three or four days a week, start with medium resistance (for quick warmup- doesn't count as an actual set), then go heavy, then go medium gain, then light.
do three sets of each exercise. heavy set, medium set, light set.
the reason for the resistance declination is so that you're burning less of each muscle groups' available glycogen at the beginning, so there's plenty toward the end.
oh, yeah- drink lotsa skim milk, give up cheese and butter, eat lean meats and chow down on papaya tablets with each protien meal, and do NOT mix protein and carbs at meals. have a carb meal, then two hours later, have a protein meal. if you do have to mix 'em, eat the protein first, carb second.
this metabolizes the protein far better.
post #9 of 26
hey vlad,

modern skiing involves new techniques ... so does modern fitness

today's trainers reccomend exercises that incorporate multiple muscle groups ... skiers especially need to work on endurance and balance simultaneously -- core, core, core!

super sets are a great way to burn fat.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
hey vlad,

modern skiing involves new techniques ... so does modern fitness

today's trainers reccomend exercises that incorporate multiple muscle groups ... skiers especially need to work on endurance and balance simultaneously -- core, core, core!

super sets are a great way to burn fat.
Exactly!!!
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
what is a super set?
post #12 of 26
ummm...hey guys- nothing in the past couple centuries has change din terms of glycogen metabolisis.
and super-setting has been around since the eighties.
working multiple muscle groups simultaneously ensures that no one group gets 100%.
pretty simple, really.
but of course, if it's buzzwords and hype you want, all my best.
post #13 of 26
phil,

http://exercise.about.com/cs/weightl.../supersets.htm

they work.

but hardly necessary - sometimes not even adviseable - in most workout routines.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
phil,

http://exercise.about.com/cs/weightl.../supersets.htm

they work.

but hardly necessary - sometimes not even adviseable - in most workout routines.

thank you, ryan.

post #15 of 26

I'm convinced

vlad is secretly GRILLMAN's lowercase brother.

Scroll to the pie story or Ctrl-F to 'manifesto'
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
ummm....
working multiple muscle groups simultaneously ensures that no one group gets 100%.
But if your goal is burning fat,then multi-joint exercises are great.
Not super-sets but muti joint exercises.
Phil didn't mention if he has previous experiance in the gym.
That has alot to do with what routine he should be doing.
Probably a basic lifting/cardio with a trainer showing the way will be good ofr the first 3 months.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
what is a super set?
A Superset is where you have 2 diff. exercises & do 1 set of each back to back without resting....

Such as DB Shrugs "supersetted" with Lateral Raises.....you would do 1 set of shrugs then immediately 1 set of lat raises....then rest.....



I have a few routines set up either in word or excel I can email to you if you'd like.....and I agree with adding muscle - it will help you burn fat faster & more efficiently....Pilates has helped me with my core strength - and I can do them home alone using the free VOD service thru my cable company....
post #18 of 26
the Curves gym system is completely based upon the "no rest" mentality (like what you have in super sets) ... it burns more fat and builds endurance.

phil,

trainers prescribe workouts in 4 phases:
1) conditioning
2) strength
3) endurance
4) maintenance

there is no magic recipe for how long each phase lasts because it's based upon the individual. isolating single muscles groups and lifting weight may make a muscle stronger, but it doesn't mean you'll develop endurance. your skiing will be greater assisted by working your body in the same way skiing works your body: anaerobic endurance: plyometrics, core strength and conditioning, balance work.
post #19 of 26
After you have a good training base and you can do everything with good form,you can try 'circuit training'.
This is where you take a seris are lifts 5 or 6 and do one set of each back to back,no rest in between, that is one set. Rest a couple min. repeat.
Do 3 sets ,great for fat burn and anaerobic endurance.
But as with everything you do you must keep changing.. Every 6 weeks find a different workout.
post #20 of 26
Phil,
Keep in mind the four points of fitness:
--smart quantities of healthful foods
--flexibility
--cardiovascular work (with a smart diet the most important for weight loss)
--strength work

You can work flexibility once or more daily. Cardio should be six days a week or fewer. Strength work should be no more than every other day. There are lots of good books on the subject and lots of books that are just fads or really poor ideas about workouts. Do your own research and find books that seem to have withstood the test of time. I like Bill Pearl's book on weights, but make a few changes.

For skiing, leg adductors are important (plus quads, hamstrings, etc). These adductors are the muscles that pull the legs together. Also, for skiing, balance is very important. For example, using dumbells alternately engages the small core muscles that help provide balance. Do these on an excersize ball or inflated balance discs and you get more balance work. Contrast this with using a Nautilus-type machine that does not allow the core to work, or even using a bench and barbell that does not allow as much core work. Skiing requires endurance, so do many repetitions of lighter weights, not few repetitions of heavy weights.

Decide what you want to achieve, and find several good routines that provide this. Change your routine from time to time so you don't get stale. Do attend classes of yoga, pilates, or whatever is offered that helps with flexibility, cardio, and balance.


Ken
post #21 of 26
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis
try 'circuit training'.
This is where you take a seris are lifts 5 or 6 and do one set of each back to back,no rest in between, that is one set. Rest a couple min. repeat.
Do 3 sets ,great for fat burn and anaerobic endurance.
I've spent thousands on PTs (two of them for about 10 at a clip several times- hit the wallet a little hard!) who specialized in endurance training, and they swore by circuits. That's what I did to train for two marathons.

Some people even run in between the sets for circuits, but then you have the risk of not only knocking into something, but looking like a dork in the gym... one thing you can to to keep your HR up is a set of jumping jacks or pushups in between sets. Even if you're only doing reps on one machine and not switching back and forth, get off the machine and do, say 15 pushups while you "rest" the muscle group you're working on the machine... that way you're not just sitting there resting and your elevated HR is burning fat.
post #23 of 26
PS- the fact that you joined a gym is a good start... I would beware of the PTs at first- they work on commission only and especially the desparate ones with no clients will be trolling for you. They have to have x-amount of clients or else they get kicked out and lose their job... At my gym in Manhattan they will come up and "chat" with you if you're just standing around. The good trainers are the ones who have too-many clients and no time to troll/chat with random people at the gym- they are the ones you want to see! If you decide to go the PT route, ask the manager of your gym for someone who specializes in endurance sports- marathons, triathlons, etc (are their skiing PTs? maybe we should start that niche!)
post #24 of 26
Quote:
are their skiing PTs? maybe we should start that niche!
Yeah there are, but we usually move out of NYC or Boston and move to ski country!
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Yeah there are, but we usually move out of NYC or Boston and move to ski country!
There you go again..always thinking of yourself.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaLuv

PS- the fact that you joined a gym is a good start...
Was it a donation?

I like Core, Core, Core.

I am also a big believer in strength training with extra attention to large muscle. I you do one group be sure to do the other ie: biceps/triceps.

Big muscles improve matabolism. They are good for skiing too.

If your weight is too high, proper diet is improtant. Get a program, don't just do it yourself. I love weight watchers, but there are others.
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