or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski sock reviews - Page 3

post #61 of 107
Hot Chillys , Smartwool and on occasion an ultra thin liner only
post #62 of 107
not cotton? Yuck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The seams alone would kill me.
post #63 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Columbia liners with Outlast and one pair of Ultimax. I like them very thin and wicking.
I have a few Outlasts and I just got a pair of thin Ultimaxs... kind of disappointed with them. Comfort wise, they're great, but I didn't find them very warm.

Well, the -20 Celsius might have something to do with that...

Only good words about the Outlast though!
post #64 of 107
Ordered some Smartwool Ultralights & Lights. I'm used to the fit of the Hot Chilly's which are super snug. The Smartwools don't quite fit as snug as the Chilly's, so I'd recommend getting a size smaller. The Light's are way too thick IMHO.
post #65 of 107
I'm a fan of Euro Super Lite socks. They're the thinnest ones I've found.
post #66 of 107

Big calves

After reading this thread, I saw and bought the Smartwool "Racing Light Cusion" in a ski shop. My feet are size 13 and my calves are pretty large--the XL fits great. The extra thickness is in the right locations (shin and heel). The rest of the sock is really thin. They also stretch to fit my XL calves without cutting off any circulation.

I have a few pairs of the medium weight. They are a bit too thick for skiing. I will use them for snowboarding. I really like how the Smartwool keeps my feet warm without making them itch.

Note: The hot chillys did not stretch wide enough for my calves. They looked like great socks but they cut the circulation off a bit (when I have my boots off).
post #67 of 107
I've been on Hot Chilis for about 10 years with no problems.

In mid-season this year I bought new boot liners with injected urethane which is completely impervious to moisture compared to my old stock liners made of absorbent open cell sponge pellets held together by a rubber cement.

Now my Hot Chilis get soaking wet and I believe any synthetic yarn will lose its insulating properties when wet. My Hot Chilis are now quite cold under foot, but that could also be due to the new intimate fit in the toe box area which was quite open with the previous liners.

So I am wondering if the wool blend socks have an advantage when wet?

Wool blend socks may feel clamy when wet, but do they feel cold at the same time?

How does a blend which includes silk perform when wet?

Thanks for any comment.
post #68 of 107
Wigwam, really thin in the two and heel. Don't know the model name.
post #69 of 107
Montreal, I would try a pair of smartwool light or Bridgedale ultra lights. I find these two are best overall with the nod to Smartwools on cold days. I also put antipersperant on my feet and a bit of paperpowder on the toes. I have also put a toe warmer on top of my toes and it works very well. Even with plug boots, there is enough room now.
post #70 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Montreal, I would try a pair of smartwool light or Bridgedale ultra lights. I find these two are best overall with the nod to Smartwools on cold days. I also put antipersperant on my feet and a bit of paperpowder on the toes. I have also put a toe warmer on top of my toes and it works very well. Even with plug boots, there is enough room now.
Thanks for your answer.

There are at least two reasons why my feet can feel colder with the new urethane liners. Either less heat is arriving near my toes because the super snug fit due to the injection is reducing blood circulation, and/or the water that is accumulating in my socks is allowing more heat to be conducted away from my skin.

I can't say to what extent my blood circulation has been diminished, but it is clear when I remove my feet from these boots that my socks are soaking wet whereas they were relatively dry before with the old liner which had a wool facing and an interior structure made from open cell, sponge like, foam pellets which I belive would have held any moisture.

Do wet Hot Chilis lose more heat than dry ones? Probably. Wool fibers supposedly have a hollow tube inside the filament that makes them insulate inspite of being wet, so wool socks seem like a good solution.

I injured the inside ankles of both feet at age 12, so I now depend on an intimate fit provided by the injected liners. I would hate to be forced to use a thick sock in order to stay warm and compromise my liner fit to the point where I start to have ankle pain again.

I have put anti-persperant on my feet and this helps, but does not stop all the moisture.

I would like to hear any news from others who are using closed-cell urethane injected liners like mine and thin socks and have also noticed an increase in moisture in their socks.
post #71 of 107
Can't believe no one's mentioned Lorpens. Saw them for the first time this year and tried them because they felt nice and thin in the wrapper. Now they're my favorites by far. They really cling and don't bunch up or pull on your toes even getting into snug boots with sticky A-line footbeds.
post #72 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladat View Post
Ski sock reviews
Mine stink...wanna whiff?
post #73 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I'm a fan of Euro Super Lite socks. They're the thinnest ones I've found.
And I use the Eurosock Ski Elite ... http://www.eurosock.com/ESNA_product.../ski_elite.htm
They're expensive but I just picked up a load at 50% off retail and seem to last longer than others I've tried (Bridgedale, Smartwool, ...)
post #74 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver View Post
Can't believe no one's mentioned Lorpens. Saw them for the first time this year and tried them because they felt nice and thin in the wrapper. Now they're my favorites by far. They really cling and don't bunch up or pull on your toes even getting into snug boots with sticky A-line footbeds.

Ditto the Loprens, have been wearing them for 3 years now, in Oz, Japan and next year Kashmir. Good socks.
post #75 of 107

Compression Sox

Just bought my daughter some compression socks at Target and she loves them. Ultra thin and they improve circulation. Don't tell Thorlo but I am totally sold on the idea of an ultra thin over the calf ski sock made from synthetic wicking materials. It is much easier to get into the boots and with the thermal liners your feet stay plenty warm.
post #76 of 107
smartwool only for me now on.
post #77 of 107
I go between using super thin synthetic blend over the calf trouser socks (Gold Toe) and thin thermolite Thorlos. I bought the Thorlos one time when I didn't have any of the trouser socks I usually ski in on me, and I didn't want to buy a pair of non ski specific socks that I haven't already tried. I like em, but don't really find them to be superior than the non ski specific socks.

I'm a bit weary of the Smartwool socks because I still find the "no itch" wool blends that I've encountered so far to be itchy, and I wouldn't want to plunk down any cash for something that might itch, especially as I haven't had any sock problems thusfar.
post #78 of 107
tresspass - thin performance socks with extra on shin and heel - good sock
post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
So I have now started on my second season with the thin over the calf nylon dress sox and I am a total convert. As Mainiac said, it sounds crazy but it works great. I have less problems getting into and out of my boots, and my feet stay comfortable and warm.

If you have problems with your boots you owe it to yourself to give this a try. It is amazing how well they work.
I am a big fan of wool socks....for hunting; even then they chew up the boot liners.

This is my third season using nylon dress socks (ex Thorlo user) with my Atomic R10 boots, and I aint going back! If you screw up and leave your boots in the cold, the nylon is so slick you can still get your boots on! Also, one can really feel the inside of the boot, and make adjustments better. I ski better because I can "articulate" my foot in the boot better. Best of all: they are cheep! Get three pair of dress socks and fuhgedaboutit.

Conclusion: modern ski boot insulation has usurped the socks' function as insulators.
post #80 of 107
Anybody ever use Oxysox? They originated in the hockey world, but sound interesting. They appear to be based on theory behind compression socks that hospital patients are given to promote bloodflow through the feet and legs. When I get a chance I plan on swinging by a hockey supply store and checking them out in person, and possible buying a pair to try out alongside my Euro Sock Super Lites.

http://www.oxysox.com/
post #81 of 107
My Smartwools Have an L and R on them. Since I am a ski Instructor this feature helps me to get dressed. Warm and don't itch.
post #82 of 107
Lorpen (work bias) but seriously they have so many different models of ski socks it is ridiculous
-silk
-merino
-regular wool
-primaloft
-outlast
-polycolon
all sorts of diffrent thicknesses
and mixes of all the above, all the high end socks have 10% lycra (not crappy elastic) so they never lose their shape
no toe seams
and once mntlion sees the light that's all he will sell....
and if you are using cotton socks you are nuts....
post #83 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac View Post
I am a big fan of wool socks....for hunting; even then they chew up the boot liners.

This is my third season using nylon dress socks (ex Thorlo user) with my Atomic R10 boots, and I aint going back! If you screw up and leave your boots in the cold, the nylon is so slick you can still get your boots on! Also, one can really feel the inside of the boot, and make adjustments better. I ski better because I can "articulate" my foot in the boot better. Best of all: they are cheep! Get three pair of dress socks and fuhgedaboutit.

Conclusion: modern ski boot insulation has usurped the socks' function as insulators.
Totally agree, I am now looking for compression sox like my daughter's. Those hockey things sound interesting, anybody know where you can buy them outside of Boston and Buffalo?
post #84 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post
Totally agree, I am now looking for compression sox like my daughter's. Those hockey things sound interesting, anybody know where you can buy them outside of Boston and Buffalo?
Are there any ice rinks near you where kids/beer leagues might play hockey? They most likely have an equipment shop for gloves, sticks, skates - and, maybe, Oxysox.
post #85 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elistan View Post
Are there any ice rinks near you where kids/beer leagues might play hockey? They most likely have an equipment shop for gloves, sticks, skates - and, maybe, Oxysox.
There's an ice rink in Red Bank, I'll check there...
post #86 of 107
Smartwool Ultralight, recently replaced by Dahlgren Merino/ Alpaca Ultralight. The alternating bands of synthetic and wool appear to keep one's feet drier. Super thin and fit well despite sticthing in the forefoot that looks like it has potential to be uncomfortable.

Any socks thicker than these and one is compromising the potential of the boots that we spend so much time, money and (sometimes) discomfort in getting perfect - so why do it?

Socks should be washed inside out, cold water, delicate cycle and preferably with a pair fo jeans in the wash too (it helps to de-pill them, good tip for washing Smartwool or Icebreaker merino kit) and hung to dry on an airer.
post #87 of 107
One more time: X-Socks ski carving ultralight!

Fantastic!

http://www.x-socks.com/product.php?c...7bd424e23fe776
post #88 of 107
Falke socks. They also have a helpful 'L' & 'R' on them.

They seem to fit well and are readily available at reasonable prices in European ski resorts.
post #89 of 107
Defeet Ski-D or Talon. these have replaced Smartwool ultralight as my first choice.
post #90 of 107
I have put anti-persperant on my feet and this helps, but does not stop all the moisture.

I've read that anti-persperants have a cumulative effect and take a week or two to reach their full effectiveness. I tried using it for a while and later just went back to thin Smartwool and Cary an extra pair in my pocket to change at lunch.
Nylon may work great if you don't sweat, but those of you who don't can not imagine how much moisture a sweaty foot can generate in two hours. My socks and my son's are wet as a wash cloth every day, while my wife's are dry as toast, yet her feet still stay cold. Everybody is different.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Member Gear Reviews