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SVST questions

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi all;
I'm thinking of buying the SVST Pro Edge Bevel Guide to replace my adjustable plastic Multi. The problem is between the wife and me, we have 1°, 2°, & 3° edge bevels.
The question is should I buy the 1° guide and a 1° & 2° shims? Does anyone have experience with the shims? Do they work well? I hate to buy 3 different guides if the shims will work.
I don't want to convert all the skis to one bevel, as they each ski well as they are, (my B2s have been switched to 2° from 1°).
Thanks!
C.B.
post #2 of 14
the shims work fine as long as you use a good spring clip, or screw clamp, not the SVST one.

holmenkol makes a great one.

look at http://www.holmenkol.us/cartproducts...sstat=&ref=323

I just use the big spring clamps that http://www.race-werks.com/product.php?prod_num=90003900
post #3 of 14
I have changed all the skis I tune to 1 and 3, it just makes things easier. I tune for four different people. No one complanes. Make it easy on yourself. Buy enough edge guides so you can have one guide for each different Moonflex diamond file. I use a 100 and 200 grit, then I'm done. Time for a beer and dinner...
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity
I have changed all the skis I tune to 1 and 3, it just makes things easier. I tune for four different people. No one complanes. Make it easy on yourself. Buy enough edge guides so you can have one guide for each different Moonflex diamond file. I use a 100 and 200 grit, then I'm done. Time for a beer and dinner...
I agree, I have multiple guides and shims. Can make duplicates of angles, less time changing stones or files!

but it is more spendy, but worth it. You still need spring clamps.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
The thing is:
my skis: Atomic M10 - 3°
Rossi B2 - 2° (2 yrs old and changed from 1° factory)

Wifes: Rossi B2w - 1°
Rossi Bandit Xw - 1°
Volkl Super Sport 5 Star - 2°

I'm happy with mine, she's real happy with her new B2s the way they are, (only used out west and on warm days here), and would do me great bodily harm if I messed with her precious Bandit Xw!!!

I guess I'll get the 1°,a couple of shims and the spring clamp. Glad you told me about the SVST clamp not being too good.
C.B.
post #6 of 14
You can get the spring clamps from Home Depot for $2.00. That's where I got mine. Check any hardware store.
post #7 of 14
Artechski.com has the SVST kit -- a 90-deg guide, and 1,2,3-deg shims. It's about $75 if I remember right, and is the way to go if you have a lot of different bevels to maintain. For that price, you get the functionality of four guides.
post #8 of 14
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post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
the shims work fine as long as you use a good spring clip, or screw clamp, not the SVST one.
Atomicman, I've found the SVST clamp that you linked to to be plenty strong enough when using my moonstones c/w SVST guide. What is it about them you don't like?

BTW, I know that you're an advocate of maintaining the side edge angle only & not touching the base angle (which I agree with), but what method do you use for then deburring the side edge?
post #10 of 14
No you misunderstood. It is the SVSt thumb screw clamp I don't like. The spring clamp is fine.

I use either a TOKO finishing block or a slightly more abrasive finishing block falt against the base edge with the ski up onit's side in the vice, base away and use my thumb as a guide on the side wall (which is facing straight up) and with melight to medium pressure go tip to tail with the stone, making sure the stone is in contact witht he base edge (I usually have about 1/3 of the stone above the side edge.

I then use the TOKO finishing block very lightly at a 45 degree angel down the side edge to make sure it is smooth.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by C.B.
Does anyone have experience with the shims? Do they work well?
Just chiming in here: the shims work very well. They're aluminum and fit quite neatly into the main tool.

One note (which it seems the original poster already knows) is that you cannot stack shims. You can use the main tool alone, or with one shim of whatever size you want.

One approach is to get the 90-degree main tool plus a set of three shims, which will allow you to do 0, 1, 2 or 3 degree bevels. You may come out ahead (even versus the package price) with a 91-degree main tool and two shims, which will still allow you to do 1, 2 and 3 degrees. If you can limit your skis to two variations (e.g. 1 degree for "everyday" skiing, 3 degrees for racing / carving skis), you can just get one tool and one shim.

On the screw clamp issue (just to flesh that out, at least according to my imperfect understanding): it works fine with just the main tool, but imperfectly if you're using a shim. The problem is that the screw threads into a tapped hole in the main tool, so it will always push down at the angle of the main tool. The back piece pushes your file or stone against the shim, but it doesn't really push it flush with the shim.

Spring clamps are actually quite easy to use. You can get them from a hardware store (or Artech or Tognar) for only a few bucks.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
Just chiming in here: the shims work very well. They're aluminum and fit quite neatly into the main tool.

One note (which it seems the original poster already knows) is that you cannot stack shims. You can use the main tool alone, or with one shim of whatever size you want.

One approach is to get the 90-degree main tool plus a set of three shims, which will allow you to do 0, 1, 2 or 3 degree bevels. You may come out ahead (even versus the package price) with a 91-degree main tool and two shims, which will still allow you to do 1, 2 and 3 degrees. If you can limit your skis to two variations (e.g. 1 degree for "everyday" skiing, 3 degrees for racing / carving skis), you can just get one tool and one shim.

On the screw clamp issue (just to flesh that out, at least according to my imperfect understanding): it works fine with just the main tool, but imperfectly if you're using a shim. The problem is that the screw threads into a tapped hole in the main tool, so it will always push down at the angle of the main tool. The back piece pushes your file or stone against the shim, but it doesn't really push it flush with the shim.

Spring clamps are actually quite easy to use. You can get them from a hardware store (or Artech or Tognar) for only a few bucks.
YOur right SJ but the screw clamp doesn't even work very well with the main tool. doesn't hold very tightly. And you are right, even worse with the shims.
post #13 of 14
Yeah , I agree a lot of the time when im doing my egdes, the files or stones slowly slip off the the placement where i set them. I end up putting two spring clamps on.
-JMK
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
No you misunderstood. It is the SVSt thumb screw clamp I don't like. The spring clamp is fine.

I use either a TOKO finishing block or a slightly more abrasive finishing block falt against the base edge with the ski up onit's side in the vice, base away and use my thumb as a guide on the side wall (which is facing straight up) and with melight to medium pressure go tip to tail with the stone, making sure the stone is in contact witht he base edge (I usually have about 1/3 of the stone above the side edge.

I then use the TOKO finishing block very lightly at a 45 degree angel down the side edge to make sure it is smooth.
Thanks Atomicman. That's my method also. Occassionally it can feel as though I'm dulling the edge a bit but I think it's because sometimes the (pre-deburred) edge can feel sharper than a properly smoothed edge.
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