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lib tech

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
anyone heard any news about this company
post #2 of 24
Liberty skis?
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
no, lib-tech. they started out as a snowboard company

http://www.lib-tech.com/
post #4 of 24
the "magne-traction" serrated edge thing sounds like a complete load of BS.
post #5 of 24
They have been around for a long time making very good quality snowboards, and I thought these were rumors, until I saw them. The Magne traction idea makes sense, to some degree, it was designed for snowboards to grip better creating focal points to grip into the snow/ice. It seemed to me a very similar idea as using cracked edges, but creating less focal points to hit the snow. I believe this was originally intended for riding the halfpipe where a lot of boards can have problems gripping the walls.
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618
the "magne-traction" serrated edge thing sounds like a complete load of BS.

The only complete load of BS is those dissing the system with out trying them first.

I have been skiing on several different versions of the prototypes and can attest to the fact that it works EXTREMLEY WELL!!!!!! In fact one of the testers made several first descents in S.A. last fall on these skis.

BTW, if you have enver heard of Lib tech snowbaords, than you are part of the problem with the ski industry today.
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
anyone heard any news about this company
I remember reading a test in a french mag, maybe a year ago, about their "wave"-like edges. They were found quite efficient. It was actualy an article about recent innovation in snow boards design that may be transposed to ski (think ZAG skis, designed by a guy from Nidecker).
The final and serious question was about the realism of such a design for mass production (there are no machine to tune such edges for instance).
post #8 of 24
I think the design has merits and makes sense, but I wonder about how you would go about tuning & maintaining a pair of these skis. Do you have to send them back to the company for re-sharpening?
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
I remember reading a test in a french mag, maybe a year ago, about their "wave"-like edges. They were found quite efficient. It was actualy an article about recent innovation in snow boards design that may be transposed to ski (think ZAG skis, designed by a guy from Nidecker).
The final and serious question was about the realism of such a design for mass production (there are no machine to tune such edges for instance).
Actually you can easily tune them on any standard shops belt tuners very easily. I have tuned several pairs fo the prototypes on the basic winterger machines with no issues at all. However the average shop stoner will need to put the bong down first. BTW the overal dimentions of these skis where derived from the Zags.
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
The only complete load of BS is those dissing the system with out trying them first.

I have been skiing on several different versions of the prototypes and can attest to the fact that it works EXTREMLEY WELL!!!!!! In fact one of the testers made several first descents in S.A. last fall on these skis.

BTW, if you have enver heard of Lib tech snowbaords, than you are part of the problem with the ski industry today.
whered you get the prototypes?
rumor has it that they dont want to make skis becasue they want to be a snowboard comapny.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
whered you get the prototypes?
rumor has it that they dont want to make skis becasue they want to be a snowboard comapny.

Ok lets think about this for a miniute. If they didnt want to make skis than why would they make them at all?????

Lib Tech ahs actually been making prototypes fo various forms for over ten years for a local baker skier named Torey Bland. Tory is a close friend of mine and is now in charge of the prototype testing program and is basically the one in charge of providing input for the ski design. The lib-tech skis are almost enitrely of his design. I have mounted the bindings on all of the protypes with the magna traction so I have a had a lot of contact with all of the porotypes in addition to having skied on all of them toprovided feed back on the stiff ness, side cut, and how the magnetraction interacts with the sidecut.
post #12 of 24
fwiw rude boys in banff has a pair of them in demo
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
BTW the overal dimentions of these skis where derived from the Zags.
Could you compare those libtech to ZAG skis, by any chance ?
(I've been impressed by ZAG design a low speeds, their skis are so easy, but they lack stability and grip.)
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
Could you compare those libtech to ZAG skis, by any chance ?
(I've been impressed by ZAG design a low speeds, their skis are so easy, but they lack stability and grip.)
I can do that... The Lib skis are very, very similar to Zag in how they ski. That being said, they have additional torsional stiffness (superior core design) and additional edge grip (superior edge design). The Zags are not for everyone, nor are the Lib Techs, but I wouldn't hesitate to say that they are fully in the ballpark for people who read Epicski.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakerBoy
I can do that... The Lib skis are very, very similar to Zag in how they ski. That being said, they have additional torsional stiffness (superior core design) and additional edge grip (superior edge design). The Zags are not for everyone, nor are the Lib Techs, but I wouldn't hesitate to say that they are fully in the ballpark for people who read Epicski.
Thanks
ZAG are maybe the ultimate cruisers in pow, they float right from the start, they turn effortlessly (soo easy on the knees), they slide easily. But they hate speed (even moderate) or hard stuff. The huge showel bounce in a frantic way and the ski just don't hold it. Not confiidence inspiring.
So the libtech look really interesting ! Extrem, from sweden, make a similar ZAG-like design also I think.
(I'm indeed the real gaper : I love power steering, power brakes and automatic gearbox when skiing in deep snow )
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
Ok lets think about this for a miniute. If they didnt want to make skis than why would they make them at all?????

Lib Tech ahs actually been making prototypes fo various forms for over ten years for a local baker skier named Torey Bland. Tory is a close friend of mine and is now in charge of the prototype testing program and is basically the one in charge of providing input for the ski design. The lib-tech skis are almost enitrely of his design. I have mounted the bindings on all of the protypes with the magna traction so I have a had a lot of contact with all of the porotypes in addition to having skied on all of them toprovided feed back on the stiff ness, side cut, and how the magnetraction interacts with the sidecut.

thats my point, why arent these skis out on the market already? why oh why?
post #17 of 24
I got to try these recently at the WWSRA northwest region demo days at Mission Ridge, WA. Granted, I only got 3 runs on the groomers with them but they were a very solid and well built product, which was to be expected as Lib Tech is an awesome name in the boarding industry. One of my friends tried a snowboard with the Magne Traction and absolutely loved it ... said it was the best ride of her life.

A couple things I noticed ... if you're talking to anyone from Lib Tech, don't call them skis - Lib calls them "skinny ass snowboards", which makes sense as they are a very hardcore snowboard company and apparently are not yet totally comfortable with venturing into the work of two plankers. I found that the Magna Traction worked almost too well as it really initiates edge grip but once you're on edge, the ski doesn't want to let go. Again, I didn't get to try them off piste and that may be a very different story, but on the groomers they were a lot of work to transition from one turn to the next. I spoke with the Lib Tech rep and apparently they are thinking of straightening the edges underfoot to address this issue (that's what I heard ... no guarantees that she knew what she was talking about).

I think it's great that a company with the reputation and hardcore following of Lib Tech is venturing into the ski world. It shows just how far the relationship between boarder and skiier has come and I really hope they take this thing through to production.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by onstar
thats my point, why arent these skis out on the market already? why oh why?
After we tested the lat round of prototypes it was decided that the tails should be softened slightly to eliminate the problem that some tester had with the skis staying on edge. Also the tail dimention will be narowed by aprox 1~2mm. I personally prefered the stiff tail, but you had to be on the ski 100 % or they would take you for a ride. Production is also slightly delayed due to the moving of all US Quicksilver offices to SLC, wich is effecting libtech as well as the skis. Also there are rumors that the skis may be made in the dynastar factory but maintain the lib badging since both companies are under the same parrent company, but that is yet to be decided / confirmed.
post #19 of 24

Western demos for Magnetraction. Hmmm.

Give us a shout when there's love for the right coast.
post #20 of 24
Prior to switching back to skis, I skied a LibTech board for years and it was first rate, so at least the company has some chops.
post #21 of 24

Lib-Tech NAS

There is a lot more to Lib Tech than snowboards...Mike Olson revolutionized the snowboard with the parabolic curves, which ultimately made its way on to your skis:
www.twsbiz.com/twbiz/profiles/article/0,21214,724880,00.html
PJJ
post #22 of 24
Those are F.A.S. (fat ass skis). If a ski that wide holds an edge that won't let go (as Geecher suggests) that's really impressive.
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618 View Post
the "magne-traction" serrated edge thing sounds like a complete load of BS.
Follow the link, 'serrated edge' sounds iffy, but it's not really a good description of these wavy edges. Looks interesting to me. By focusing pressure at discreet points along the ski's edge, traction could be enhanced. I'd like to try a snowboard with magnatraction. The value of such edge hold on a fat ski might be limited to the occasional hardpacked runout, etc.

The base edge appears to be flat, so base grind no problem. Side edge sharpen by hand with a short file (like the ones used in many side filing devices)? Would that work?
post #24 of 24
I first saw a pair of these this past Memorial Day in the demo shop at Squaw Valley. They were lined up next to a pair of the Goode Monstros and a pair of the Elan 1111. They were mounted, but kind of stashed in the back room. I took a peek at them and asked if they were available for demo. Alas, the conditions were super spring/summer, so they weren't technically leasing them out.

Last weekend I visited a shop here in the Bay called Demo Ski. They have the NAS's available in the 188 for sale. I got to look them over, flex them and talk to the shop's owner who skis them as part of his 3-ski quiver (the other skis being an Explosiv and a pair of R:EX). He told me that they're great and he's used them in the chutes of Alta where edge hold was really a necessity. I forget which ski he recently rotated out to put the Lib into his quiver, but he said he hasn't regretted the swap.
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