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How do you jumpstart your skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
shame psia/aasi doesn't even acknowledge this elite racing methodology, we'd see far and away more precise, controlled and carving first-day boarders and skiers out there.
:

Wrong. I have done many AASI clinics where we worked on those kinds of drills. As a matter of fact, I understudied a level 300 MA course last weekend where we did it again.

I have not been with PSIA much to know what they are or are not doing with it.
post #32 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewil
Sorry Vlad,

You made an factual assertion that Kiersten is caught in an "intermediate rut" that is pure bovine scatology. You got caught with your pants down and now your trying to weasel.

You might try to tell this board HOW you can assert someone you have never seen ski, know nothing about, utilize one response in this thread and determine she is stuck in an "intermediate rut".

Far too frequently when someone disagrees with you we see this typical response. Unfortunately your the one digging deeper in the rut Vald-in this case first hand professional knowledge of Kiersten's skiing has validated your bovine scatology.

PS: Don't waste your time attacking the "professional knowledge"-it ain't gonna fly.

how about you just call her up and ask her out, instead of going to all this trouble, dude?
the white knight thing ain't working...
remember:
anytime we entirely discount something which elites ahve been successfully employing for decades, we're stifling our growth.
when we stop growing, we're in a rut.
to be in a rut IS an intermediate position.
anyway, I hope she goes for your little act.
go, you
(ps- bring a solid jazz CD to set the mood...i'm thinking something featuring stan goetz best with that, ... -Vlad)
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills
Wrong. I have done many AASI clinics where we worked on those kinds of drills. As a matter of fact, I understudied a level 300 MA course last weekend where we did it again.

I have not been with PSIA much to know what they are or are not doing with it.
first, you're espousing torque-turning, now you say aasi employs drive? what do you mean by 'those kinds of drills'?
maybe you just meant, broadly, drills utilizing snowboards strapped to one's feet?
aasi does NOT recognize 'driiving' the board, phil, by starting the turn with thefeet behind the knes, and ending it with the feet in front of the knees, although pre-aasi psia guys used to study our team and try to video us 'driving' our boards.
hey- just show me proof that aasi is promoting such drive via starting the run with feet behind the knees, and ending with feet in front.
and, incidentally, aasi IS psia in scary droopy-drawer drag.
kinda llike vintage 'pink flamingos' Divine but with a 'grenade' logo tatoo.....
post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
we would stand in place and 'drive' our boards forward and back, with our knees, while our upper bodies remained stationaryy over a point in the snow.
this is the single most important exercise i know of for getting skiers and boarders outta the intermediate/upper intermediate rut.
far and away the best.
you stand in place, 'driving' your skiis/snowboard back and forth under you, while your upper body stays perfectly static over a point on the snow, then, as you take off, you continue this movement, and as you enter your first turn, you drive your feet forward, form under the heinie to ahead of the knees, as you go.
I did not think that it was necessary to quote the drill as well. When was the last time you attended an AASI clinic? They teach that there is more than one way to skin a cat. The two clinics that I have understudied this year have both talked about "being all over the board" - in other words getting to know turns and maneuvers from all over the board. We have done the exact drill that you said. In fact, the first time that I remember doing it was in 1997 with Ted F. and eastern examiner. I can't show you proof, you have to go to a clinic. When you go to some L II stuff and most L III stuff they are doing things that are beyond what is in the manual, so I can't point to a place in the manual that tells you to try this stuff.

AASI has generally differed from PSIA in that they are a little more open minded and continue to be open to new ideas (IMO). They are always trying to get riders to try new things and not stick to a mold. It is amazing to me how many different styles of riding can be at an exam and yet many different styles and techniques still pass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
aasi IS psia in scary droopy-drawer drag.
kinda llike vintage 'pink flamingos' Divine but with a 'grenade' logo tatoo.....
Well, I have taken up skiing and my goal is to get my L III in that. I have found that they are part of the same organization, but the philosophies are pretty different.

I am sorry to hear that they do not meet the Vlad standard. I am sure that they are disapointed.
post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills
I did not think that it was necessary to quote the drill as well. When was the last time you attended an AASI clinic? They teach that there is more than one way to skin a cat. The two clinics that I have understudied this year have both talked about "being all over the board" - in other words getting to know turns and maneuvers from all over the board. We have done the exact drill that you said. In fact, the first time that I remember doing it was in 1997 with Ted F. and eastern examiner. I can't show you proof, you have to go to a clinic. When you go to some L II stuff and most L III stuff they are doing things that are beyond what is in the manual, so I can't point to a place in the manual that tells you to try this stuff.

AASI has generally differed from PSIA in that they are a little more open minded and continue to be open to new ideas (IMO). They are always trying to get riders to try new things and not stick to a mold. It is amazing to me how many different styles of riding can be at an exam and yet many different styles and techniques still pass.



Well, I have taken up skiing and my goal is to get my L III in that. I have found that they are part of the same organization, but the philosophies are pretty different.

I am sorry to hear that they do not meet the Vlad standard. I am sure that they are disapointed.
master thrills: it IS neccesary to quote the drills. I'd really like to see the proof.
I have never attended an aasi clinic, nor will i.
my level II austrian snowboard (alpine) is as far as i care to go in any snowboard teaching system.
so, you're telling me, in the above post, that i 'have to go to a clinic' to learn the aasi technique you mentioned, that it's NOT printed anywhere? that's odd. dude- aasi HAS to be more open-minded than their parent system, PSIA- they are much, much younger, and newer to their sport.
aasi is 'all over the board' (your words) because they can't settle on a centerline approach.
while i your well-intended sarcasm is appreciated, consider, for a moment, where i'm coming from, in my snowboarding career, and the consider for whom it is that aasi's designed.
i know some truly excellent riders who are full-dress aasi certs, and i tip my hat to 'em, on all levels. probelm is, aasi is far too 'all over the board' as you put it, to offer any substantial standard.
aasi is pretty insignificant in the bigger world snowboard teaching/coaching/competing picture.
get out and ride with the big boys, train under the best coaches in the history of the sport, and you'll start thinking for yourself more.
but before you make the claim that aasi acknowledges and uses my techniques, please just prove it. they're a modern teaching system, surely they have a documented manual of their progression and techniques.
'torque-twist steering. please.:
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
'torque-twist steering. please.:
You still have not given any good argument otherwise, nor have you disproved my 3 examples in the other post.

BTW. You are right (so far as I can tell) that this is not a technique focused on in the WC. It happens, but it is not a focus.

I have watched many videos of riders using that technique - slow motion and can see the board twisting into and out of the turns. It is especially evident in short radius skidded turns.

To test it, it is as simple as having someone on their heel side edge across the hill. Have them press down with the toeside with their front foot. Where does the board go? It starts downhill on that side. They twisted the board, it headed in that direction. Is that really so hard to understand?

To the rest of you, I apologize for the thread highjack. This should really be in the snowboard forum.
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills


Well, I have taken up skiing and my goal is to get my L III in that. I have found that they are part of the same organization, but the philosophies are pretty different.

I am sorry to hear that they do not meet the Vlad standard. I am sure that they are disapointed.
and incidentally, professor, i earned my level III psia (alpine) almost 20 years ago. and they're not 'part of the same organization', they ARE the same. aasi is just a sobriquet for psia-snowboard, as i'm sure you know...
hey- you've got an open invitation to come out to the czech republic or the engadin, CH, to train with and teach with my school. I'd welcome you with great enthusiasm and a big liter of beer....and you'd likely meet some hot babes.
regardless, you'll make neough to eat and buy a few cheap souvenirs to send home. you'll also make lifelong , international friends.
you'd get the opportunity to pursue your austrian or swiss cert.
our instructors typically get their first-level austrian onsite at the czech school, and they get their higher levels at the austrian resorts right outside our swiss location. ischgl (one of austria's most snowboard friendly resorts) is connected to samnaun, CH, and there are lev. II certs there each season.
it's a little pricey, but well worth it. hell- get your lev. I austrian and bring some of that back to aasi, or vice-versa. try the swiss system. on another nore...any idea what csia is presently doing with respect to boarding?
hit all the systems. that's what i did as a young ski instructor/ mediocre ski racer.
i wish there were younger american snowboard educators who would pursue other systems.....
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills
You still have not given any good argument otherwise, nor have you disproved my 3 examples in the other post.

BTW. You are right (so far as I can tell) that this is not a technique focused on in the WC. It happens, but it is not a focus.

I have watched many videos of riders using that technique - slow motion and can see the board twisting into and out of the turns. It is especially evident in short radius skidded turns.

To test it, it is as simple as having someone on their heel side edge across the hill. Have them press down with the toeside with their front foot. Where does the board go? It starts downhill on that side. They twisted the board, it headed in that direction. Is that really so hard to understand?

To the rest of you, I apologize for the thread highjack. This should really be in the snowboard forum.
don't apologize. it's idiotic for anyone to demand that we segregate the two disciplines. the better you get at each, the more similar they really are.
phil- you'll see cartwheeling falls happen in WC. doesn't mean they're intentional or effective. same with troque steer.
sure, it works for changing direction, so does jumping up off the snow and doing a 180. doesn't make it effective, practical, or correct.
it was actually conjured up as a way for burton to wrest control of the burgeoning teaching market here in america. it was also a way for burton, the notorious patent addicts, to patent the only board with which to learn to snowboard by this idiotic technique.
'twisting' a board is acheesy shortcut to actually bending it in order to carve a clean arc, and to slicing with the sidecut.
'twsiting' the entire snowboard, torsionally, works against the principle of a clean turn based on edge profile.
it's a cheap stunt dreamt up by marketing whores in order to turn higher quarterly profits.
think about it- the carve marks in the snow should reflect the arc of the sidecut, varied by bending the ski or snowboard.
'twisting' that ski or snowboard fights the clean line and the speed of the turn. it causes one end of the board to brake slightly while the other end releases slightly, instead of having constant pressure along the edge for a stable, clean turnj.
phil: mark my words:
it's a cheesy fad, and it'll go the way of the GLM system, the asym board, and the swingbo.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
it causes one end of the board to brake slightly while the other end releases slightly,
Which is exactly how it can work to initiate a skidded turn - or any of the other two examples I cited.
post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills
Which is exactly how it can work to initiate a skidded turn - or any of the other two examples I cited.
oh, gee! falling on one's ass can work to initiate a skidded trun, too.
maybe aasi should teach that method in their "it's all good" system



sgt. thrills: you're a member of a blindfolded system which gropes it's way through snowboarding, inventing sh*t up as it goes along.

get out into the world and look at other systems, or at least question the ludicrous torque-twist method of steering.
imagine if ski companies began manyufacturing skis which had torsionally soft waists above which isolated bindings were mounted, and the skier utilized extranneous movements in order to twist the edge of the ski's shovel one way, and the edge of the ski's tail the other.
it'd be a weird llittle trend that wouldn't stick around long, either.
post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
how about you just call her up and ask her out, instead of going to all this trouble, dude?
the white knight thing ain't working...
remember:
anytime we entirely discount something which elites ahve been successfully employing for decades, we're stifling our growth.
when we stop growing, we're in a rut.
to be in a rut IS an intermediate position.
anyway, I hope she goes for your little act.
go, you
(ps- bring a solid jazz CD to set the mood...i'm thinking something featuring stan goetz best with that, ... -Vlad)
Once again you run off an hide-attempt to redfine the issue presented to your own strange viewpoints.

Sorry, my social life is quite fine without your pathetic attempts to say otherwise.

The candles have burned out at your alter your highness. And the incense is fading too.
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewil
Once again you run off an hide-attempt to redfine the issue presented to your own strange viewpoints.

Sorry, my social life is quite fine without your pathetic attempts to say otherwise.

The candles have burned out at your alter your highness. And the incense is fading too.


i'll alert the media.... and i believe you mean "altar", and "redfine" isn't actually a word...

but thanks for playing, and please feel free to choose from our fine selection of parting gifts as you exit the studio

post #43 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
and incidentally, professor, i earned my level III psia (alpine) almost 20 years ago. and they're not 'part of the same organization', they ARE the same. aasi is just a sobriquet for psia-snowboard, as i'm sure you know...
hey- you've got an open invitation to come out to the czech republic or the engadin, CH, to train with and teach with my school. I'd welcome you with great enthusiasm and a big liter of beer....and you'd likely meet some hot babes.
regardless, you'll make neough to eat and buy a few cheap souvenirs to send home. you'll also make lifelong , international friends.
you'd get the opportunity to pursue your austrian or swiss cert.
our instructors typically get their first-level austrian onsite at the czech school, and they get their higher levels at the austrian resorts right outside our swiss location. ischgl (one of austria's most snowboard friendly resorts) is connected to samnaun, CH, and there are lev. II certs there each season.
it's a little pricey, but well worth it. hell- get your lev. I austrian and bring some of that back to aasi, or vice-versa. try the swiss system. on another nore...any idea what csia is presently doing with respect to boarding?
hit all the systems. that's what i did as a young ski instructor/ mediocre ski racer.
i wish there were younger american snowboard educators who would pursue other systems.....
ahem - vload you are going to end up with a heap of people out there if you keep inviting everyone you argue with

On the plus side at least you are balancing out the student/instructor ratio nicely
post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
oh, gee! falling on one's ass can work to initiate a skidded trun, too.
maybe aasi should teach that method in their "it's all good" system


.
: they don't???? :

I was sure they must teach it... so many boarders use that method.... and the technique is so similar... even down to the verbal assists...
post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
ahem - vload you are going to end up with a heap of people out there if you keep inviting everyone you argue with

On the plus side at least you are balancing out the student/instructor ratio nicely
trust me, it's a busy school.
a very busy school.
i'd be stoked if even a fraction of the bears i invited ever showed up.
i'll be shocked if even one does, though.
ya see, most o'me fellow yank instructors aren't real keen on getting outside the american skiing box, hence the stifling dead air of the american ski teaching classroom.
nobody really wants all that fresh air coming in......
that's OK, though: more clean, fresh mountain air for vlad the inhaler....
post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
: they don't???? :

I was sure they must teach it... so many boarders use that method.... and the technique is so similar... even down to the verbal assists...
this brings me to one of those admissions of psia having superiority, in some minor respects, over other systems. when i was studying my book for my lev. II canadian, i came across the A class progression involving teaching the student to 'sit down' when they're in trouble on the hill and feel out-of-control ( good BYE, ACLs and medial meniscii) .
my first thought was "check, please!"....but cooler instincts prevailed, and young vladmir kept his yankee trap the hell shut, and got his purdy pin....
i remember my mom, who was still current with her CSIA III at the time, busting my chops about that li'l tidbit in the system. i was all gung-ho on CSIA, and she was trying to change her school over to psia, and i was resisting her efforts.
she finally bribed me to join her at a level I (nee "registration") clinic/exam at stratton, where we were placed (i found out later she set it up) in a group with a VERY cool old swiss examiner (otto 'frei'), who insisted on taking us to the little tyrolean inn each night to listen to the innkeeper (emo heinrich, i think?) play classical guitar.
very devious and clever woman, my mom.
the following year I was brushing up for my level II ( nee "associate") on the hill with some of our staff's level III (nee "Full") trainers every other day.
by the time I got that, I was so jerked off to get my "full" (did NOT come easy, Ringo) that I let my canuck II sit idle, and never pursued the CSIA III.
i imagine it's muchthe same for most aasi aspirants.
the challenge and camaraderie are the real key to the process, and if that can be transferred to their later pupils, then everyone's a winner.
somehow, i get the impression that mr. thrills is well-sobriqueted in this respect, and likely teaches an absolutely outstanding lesson.
the carvers' thing he put together reminds me of the motorcycle sportriding events i like to put together. same idea.
passion.
post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
trust me, it's a busy school.
a very busy school.
i'd be stoked if even a fraction of the bears i invited ever showed up.
i'll be shocked if even one does, though.
ya see, most o'me fellow yank instructors aren't real keen on getting outside the american skiing box, hence the stifling dead air of the american ski teaching classroom.
nobody really wants all that fresh air coming in......
that's OK, though: more clean, fresh mountain air for vlad the inhaler....

yeah - we noticed... we keep telling them to come and visit but they just want to stay at home....

we even told them we have macdonalds

So you will be shocked when I turn up on the door step?
post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
yeah - we noticed... we keep telling them to come and visit but they just want to stay at home....

we even told them we have macdonalds

So you will be shocked when I turn up on the door step?
not a whit.
you're not a denizen of "the land of the free, home of the ambulance-chasing, super-sizing plastic-surgery attorney"
shame , though. the czech school's a 2-hour busride (through the bohemian countryside) from prague, and all that that gothic gem has to offer. arts, culture, nightlife, great beer, absinthe, cheap hash, even cheaper gypsy hookers...
post #49 of 56
but I'm still a bear....
post #50 of 56
bears exist on almost every continent
post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
i'd be stoked if even a fraction of the bears i invited ever showed up.
i'll be shocked if even one does, though.

ya didn't say YANK bears... just bears
post #52 of 56
that's my point, exactly. most bears here ARE fellow yanks.
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
ever since i trained under jim mckean of the green mtn. academy, i ahve started every run...
every run...
with a tai-chi-esque balance drill at the top.
find flat ground, stand with skis comfortably apart, body upright and relaxed in skiing position.
throw your masss ove rthe shovesl, pause there, adn ssssllllllllllooooooooowwwwwwwwwwwwwwlllllllllllll lyyyyyyyy return to that relaxed, centered, 'stopping point' where you just settle in.
now, repeat the same for throwing yourself back, and ssssssssssllllllllllllllloooooooooowwwwwwwwwwlllll lllllyyyyyy returning, again, to that centered, settled position. each time when you get there, bounce slowly and breathe, really slowly. cut some new groove sinto your barin, in reference to where you center is.
now, repeat same for each side, 'falling over' slightly, left, then slllllllooooooooowwwwwwwwwwwllllllllllllllly back to center, with a settle, and bounce, and breathing moment, then right, etc.
next, rotate left, back to center, slowooolllllyyyy, an after a settle, rroatte right, etc....

do this before each run and you'll have supreme balance, always.
follow me sometime and see

this changed my skiing 200%.
it'll change yours.
i expect feedback after you've tried this one, ladies and germs.....
vlad, i have been using this since you suggested it. especially before a demanding run you know you need all you can bring to it. i can see how the brain will use this to store differant input of balancing information and i find it very helpful. thx
post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
vlad i have been using this since you suggested it. especially before a demanding run you know you need all you can bring to it i can see how the brain will use this to store differant input of balancing information and i find it very helpful. thx
right on! thanks much for taking the time to mention it,Gar!
my girlfriend goes through this drill on her board, each run.
i always run through it on board or 'boards'...every run.
post #55 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colossus178
What do you folks do on those days when you're off balance, out of sorts, and generally not skiing well? Do you have any techniques or routines to get back on form? I'm thinking I need to develop a checklist and routine that I can quickly go through, something like this off-the-cuff example:

Hops;
One-legged skiing;
1000-step turns;

followed by

Weight centered?... check
Hips forward?... check
Hands forward?... check
Shins/back at same angle?... check

I would think that such a routine/checklist would also be useful on those days when I'm going to ski something steep and challenging without a lot of time to warm up and get my legs under me properly. If your plan is to do one or two warm up runs and then jump into something very challenging, how do you prepare? What do you do on those warm up runs, particularly on days that you don't feel that you're skiing very well?
The only thing I've ever read on epic ski, and applied, that did much for me, seems to be the answer to your question: ankle flexion. This is what seems to have the effect of lining up the rest of me.

I don't know (or care) why, but when I can focus on flexing at the ankle while turning (regardless of terrain or conditions), I quickly find the balance I seek, and from balance I find dynamic flow.
post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
The only thing I've ever read on epic ski, and applied, that did much for me, seems to be the answer to your question: ankle flexion. This is what seems to have the effect of lining up the rest of me.

I don't know (or care) why, but when I can focus on flexing at the ankle while turning (regardless of terrain or conditions), I quickly find the balance I seek, and from balance I find dynamic flow.

then maybe it's time you applied the exercise which i posted, eh?
only used by more than half of all weltcup racers, bumpers, etc.
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