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Fly-tying class is starting!

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Totally off-topic,

But my Dad just retired in October after over 40 years of practicing Dentistry, and I was worried that he wouldn't know what to do with himself. He is a work-aholic and his mind needs to be constantly occupied.

Just heard that he will be teaching a 6-week Fly-tying class at the local library on Thursday nights. GO DAD!

I can remember as kids that we were forbidden to set foot in the fly-tying/hunting room unless we had shoes on - for fear of stray hooks on the floor! There are still cans and jars of seemingly every known species of feather and fur/hair that one can imagine in that room, and the smell of the mothballs that he put in the cans with the squirrel tails still makes me think of that room.... that, and the smell of "head cement".

I'm tickled that he will be passing this on.
post #2 of 26
Good for him! I have fond memories of learning to tie flies when I was a child.

In my twenties someone gave me a spinner rod, and I didn't know how to use it. I only knew how to use a fly rod. I think I spent too much time catching, gutting, and eating trout as a child. I don't fish anymore, and I rarely eat trout, either.
post #3 of 26

Flyfishing and retirement

If you think there are a lot of ways to define, describe, analyze, critique and just talk about a ski turn you haven't seen snything until you start the discussion about mayflies, caddisflies, terrestials etc. and how to simulate, tie, spin, dub, palmer, hackle, parachute and then how to present, fish and whats the best fish to catch etc. Sounds like your dad will really be into his new "job". Hardest fighting rainbow trout ever caught: Bow river running out of Calgary Canada - Early October - make a great present/trip etc. Just some rambling thoughts from a 40 yr fly tier and fisherman, except in winter when the snow flies.
post #4 of 26
This reminds of how close I am to opening day of trout fishing here in NY. April 1st and I cannot wait. Fishing is 2nd to only skiing for me!
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
This reminds of how close I am to opening day of trout fishing here in NY. April 1st and I cannot wait. Fishing is 2nd to only skiing for me!
huck- check your DEC Reg.s book-
even though many folks await apr. 1 for 'opening day', there are many bodies of water here in NY where the taking of trout is legal all winter long.
there's a lake (pond, really- this is downstate) 5 minutes from me, DEC stocked, where it's legal to take trout all winter long, and i believe the same holds true in the Ramapo River (about a half-hour from NYC's GW Bridge).
while I would advise against attempting to dangle a royal coachman from a tip-up's braided line, there's plenty of good jigging and open-water (warm winter) streamer fishing here in the empire state, right now....i passed up an offer to go for walleye at swinging bridge, today ...it involved leaving the house at 4 am.
i prefer my ice-fsihing in the afternoon/evening.
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho
If you think there are a lot of ways to define, describe, analyze, critique and just talk about a ski turn you haven't seen snything until you start the discussion about mayflies, caddisflies, terrestials etc. and how to simulate, tie, spin, dub, palmer, hackle, parachute and then how to present, fish and whats the best fish to catch etc. Sounds like your dad will really be into his new "job". Hardest fighting rainbow trout ever caught: Bow river running out of Calgary Canada - Early October - make a great present/trip etc. Just some rambling thoughts from a 40 yr fly tier and fisherman, except in winter when the snow flies.
the very best part about all of that is, when you hit the stream, regardless of the hatch, local kids with "nightwalkers" will still pull out more brookies than the guy with the fleece-banded M*A*S*H hat with all the hardware on #2s
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
huck- check your DEC Reg.s book-
even though many folks await apr. 1 for 'opening day', there are many bodies of water here in NY where the taking of trout is legal all winter long.
there's a lake (pond, really- this is downstate) 5 minutes from me, DEC stocked, where it's legal to take trout all winter long, and i believe the same holds true in the Ramapo River (about a half-hour from NYC's GW Bridge).
while I would advise against attempting to dangle a royal coachman from a tip-up's braided line, there's plenty of good jigging and open-water (warm winter) streamer fishing here in the empire state, right now....i passed up an offer to go for walleye at swinging bridge, today ...it involved leaving the house at 4 am.
i prefer my ice-fsihing in the afternoon/evening.
Indeed that is true Vlad. Parts of chittenango creek by where I live you can take trout all year. Just not the parts I like to fish above the falls that holds some monster browns. Catherine creek down by the finger lakes I am also waiting for opening day. Some massive browns and rainbows in there! I caught a few last year exceeding 8 pounds. Biggest trout I ever caught was a 18 pound brown trout out of the Oswego river 2 years ago while I was salmon fishing i n october. I still kick myself in the ass for not mounting that baby on the wall. I never keep the fish I catch though. Catch and release for me. I keep some walleyes here and there to grill from oneida lake. Check this one out. I got it from my boat last summer on Oneida lake. @8 incher pretty decent size for Oneida Lake. No trout pics on digital. I would definately ruin the camera. I need a underwater case for it
post #8 of 26
Hey Frau : that's very cool about your dad !

he may surprise you in retirement -Hel the way i define retirement is ADOLESCENCE WITH benefit of $$$$$

take him skiing and turn him loose !
post #9 of 26

.....

That's nice to hear Frau.....
Many KUDOS for your C&R hucking........
post #10 of 26
C&R rocks. I gotta get a cheap digicam.
those are some outrageous browns, huck!!!! DANG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I've never landed any trout of over a few pounds.
I love those deep holes in trout streams where big ole brownies and hook-jawed brookies lurk.
haven't caught anything like you're talking about, though.
One of my instructors in my school was a competiotive trout fisherman for the czech republic. there's this beautiful, historic stream which runs through the middle of the resort, the mumlava, which hold gorgeous browns. they're the big local dish in all the restaurants in the ski town, there...trout's called "pstroh", salmon's called "lossos".
on the drive up the winding road into the krkonose mountains, you pass quite a few trout hatcheries getting to the resort.
you oughta czech it out, huck.
post #11 of 26
Well catch and release to me means more fish for my children to catch. I love fishing especially salmon and trout! If your still around NY this late spring and summer Vlad we should meet up and I will get you into some big browns and rainbows. If your around in fall I can get you hooked up with numerous salmon per day. Salmon are a blast. Man they are a powerful fish. Even tougher when they are running with the current of the river.
post #12 of 26
Frau that's great! Hope yer pop also turns the stewdents onto some fishing lichurchor.....
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
Well catch and release to me means more fish for my children to catch. I love fishing especially salmon and trout! If your still around NY this late spring and summer Vlad we should meet up and I will get you into some big browns and rainbows. If your around in fall I can get you hooked up with numerous salmon per day. Salmon are a blast. Man they are a powerful fish. Even tougher when they are running with the current of the river.
I'm down, ranger.
i've only ever landed one salmon in my whole life, and that was a little landlocked bugger up in osgood pond in the 'dacks. (i was going for northerns).
my big brother used to migrate to pulaski every salmon season, i never joined him.
my trout fishing's been primarily brookies and average browns here in NY State, browns in europe, dolly varden, relatively small lakers, and (true) goldens in the sierra nevada.
we were always a big fishing family, and I still get out on the ice for nice chains and grass pickerel , along with huge crappies, this winter.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
I'm down, ranger.
i've only ever landed one salmon in my whole life, and that was a little landlocked bugger up in osgood pond in the 'dacks. (i was going for northerns).
my big brother used to migrate to pulaski every salmon season, i never joined him.
my trout fishing's been primarily brookies and average browns here in NY State, browns in europe, dolly varden, relatively small lakers, and (true) goldens in the sierra nevada.
we were always a big fishing family, and I still get out on the ice for nice chains and grass pickerel , along with huge crappies, this winter.
Well good then. You comeing from big fishing family means I don't have to tell you how quiet we need to be to catch the big river trout. They spook easily as I am sure you know. Thta should be a capital "R" Ranger
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by FRAU
Totally off-topic,

But my Dad just retired in October after over 40 years of practicing Dentistry, and I was worried that he wouldn't know what to do with himself. He is a work-aholic and his mind needs to be constantly occupied.

Just heard that he will be teaching a 6-week Fly-tying class at the local library on Thursday nights. GO DAD!

I can remember as kids that we were forbidden to set foot in the fly-tying/hunting room unless we had shoes on - for fear of stray hooks on the floor! There are still cans and jars of seemingly every known species of feather and fur/hair that one can imagine in that room, and the smell of the mothballs that he put in the cans with the squirrel tails still makes me think of that room.... that, and the smell of "head cement".

I'm tickled that he will be passing this on.
Nice...And, as you no doubt know, when you have an ardent fly tyer in the family, you are never lacking for gift ideas. I've never participated in a more gear-intensive pursuit! Fly tying and, to a lesser extent, flyfishing blow the doors off of bicycling and skiing when it comes to the sheer amount and variety of associated stuff that the participant just has to have. And I can't think of any other activity in which you can brush out the family dog, put the hair in a ziploc bag, label it nicely, gift-wrap it, and give it proudly as a present to your favorite fly tyer.

For what it's worth, if your Dad is an internet kinda guy, there's an active group of flyfishers and fly tiers that keep in touch via the usenet group rec.outdoors.fishing.fly. It's the flyfishing and flyting equivalent of EpicSki in that these folks (guys mostly) get together in real life on a regular basis, both out west and back east, to fish, swap lies and flies, etc.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
Well good then. You comeing from big fishing family means I don't have to tell you how quiet we need to be to catch the big river trout. They spook easily as I am sure you know. Thta should be a capital "R" Ranger
well...yeah! fulldress BDUs and soft shoes
leave the danners and corcorans home, Ranger
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
well...yeah! fulldress BDUs and soft shoes
leave the danners and corcorans home, Ranger
great boots ! shorts and sneakers. I don't like waiters. The legs go numb after about ten minutes then your good to go
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito
Nice...And, as you no doubt know, when you have an ardent fly tyer in the family, you are never lacking for gift ideas. I've never participated in a more gear-intensive pursuit! Fly tying and, to a lesser extent, flyfishing blow the doors off of bicycling and skiing when it comes to the sheer amount and variety of associated stuff that the participant just has to have. And I can't think of any other activity in which you can brush out the family dog, put the hair in a ziploc bag, label it nicely, gift-wrap it, and give it proudly as a present to your favorite fly tyer.

For what it's worth, if your Dad is an internet kinda guy, there's an active group of flyfishers and fly tiers that keep in touch via the usenet group rec.outdoors.fishing.fly. It's the flyfishing and flyting equivalent of EpicSki in that these folks (guys mostly) get together in real life on a regular basis, both out west and back east, to fish, swap lies and flies, etc.
Giggles about the dog hair - so true!
Thanks Gnarlito. He's not a total internet freak like I am, but he is computer savvy, so I'll pass that along to him.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
great boots ! shorts and sneakers. I don't like waiters. The legs go numb after about ten minutes then your good to go
absolutely agreed. old-school SeAL issue Chuck Taylors can't be beat for wading........
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
absolutely agreed. old-school SeAL issue Chuck Taylors can't be beat for wading........
LOL, Chuch Taylors, I cannot remember the last time I have seen someone wering chuck taylors around here. There must of been alot of SEALS with blown out ankles
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
LOL, Chuch Taylors, I cannot remember the last time I have seen someone wering chuck taylors around here. There must of been alot of SEALS with blown out ankles
i doubt they used 'em much with parabolic canopies and LALOS, except for helicasting fom hueys into the drink, bareback (no chute).
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
absolutely agreed. old-school SeAL issue Chuck Taylors can't be beat for wading........
Those are standard issue for Aquatic Biology classes.

L
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
Those are standard issue for Aquatic Biology classes.

L
makes sense.
first seabees adopted chuck taylors and levis as standard wear, then UDTs did the same, and finall SeALS came to be, sporting around in their own tan chucks, black levis and sears-roebuck camo jackets.
still the best trout-brook duds out there.....
post #24 of 26
way to go, Father-of-FRAU!

if I hadn't taken a fly tying class at Wolf's Fly Shop in Ellicott City MD, I'd never have visited Missoula and therefore it's unlikely I'd be here today. Scott Wolf convinced me to go poormouth for 6 months to afford a trip out here. he was righter than he ever knew.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie
Those are standard issue for Aquatic Biology classes.

L
only if the sole is worn through at the arch, so that you can get arch bruising within your first 3-4 steps in the rocky stream bed!
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
only if the sole is worn through at the arch, so that you can get arch bruising within your first 3-4 steps in the rocky stream bed!
Which also makes them great to swim in when you go in over your head.

Many years ago, I had just finished my masters and was trying to get into the pH.D. program at University of Tennessee. I was hoping to study under David Etenier who is a guru of fish taxonomy/biogeography. Most folks kown him as the man who "discovered" the snail darter. Anyway, as a kid of the Late 70 and 80's, I had many pairs of Chukie T's in my arsenal (In fact there's a picture of my feet in them in my high school yearbook....) Anyway, I was taking some classes trying to get my face/name known in the fall semester. One of these way ichthyology with Dr. Etenier. I'll never forget our first field trip. I showed up in my Chuck Taylors and Dr. Etenier just smiled (he was a child of the 50's). All the other kids (much younger than me) looked at me puzzled. We did a couple of seine pulls and then Dr. Etenier looked at me and says "Ya know, we need to do a downstream pull on the cut bank of the far side of the river. Lonnie, do you want to help me?" "Sure", I replied. So I waded across this fairly nice (big) riffle and Etenier said to me, "I'm gonna be the anchor. You stay as close as you can to the bank, and what ever you do, don't let the seine come off the bottom. OK?" "O.k." So we started working down the bank. About 40' in, WOOSH!!! I'm swimming. Etenier is just laughing. Total set up. But the seine never came off the bottom. I was breast stroking with one hand with my other hand on the top of the seine about at my waist. I made it back to shallower ground and we finished the pull. A "Good job" and a towel greeted me on the far bank where we were sorting out the fish. Had I had on hip boots or waders like most of the other students, I don't know if I would have been as lucky. Etenier always said, Lonnie has the best field shoes ever made.

I think that was the day I first heard the phrase "Well, aquatic biologists, get wet."

Etenier was a cool dude. One of the highlights of the year wash when the "fish lab" would host the "dead animal party". The whole purpose to the dead animal party was to eat as many different species of animal as one could in a single night. As you can imagine, copious amounts of alcohol were involved. There was a theme every year. For example, 10 an 20 blackbirds baked in a pie, where they went out and shot a bunch of starilings (being the invasive species they are), but pretty much every everything you could think of was on the menu. Lots of stuff was bought Chicken, beef, pork turkey etc, but lots was fished/hunted too. Trout, bass, bluegill, catfish, ducks, rabbits, squirrels, deer, even the stray opossum showed up one year (I heard unconfirmed rumors that that one was actually road kill) The farther the night went along the more adventurous things got. Kinda like a bad episode of fear factor.....

I met my wife over Christmas after that semester and the direction of my life changed. But I'll never forget those good times being dirt poor and living in "K-town". Thanks for letting me hijack and reminisce.
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