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Training gizmo that works

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
I'm generally leery of gizmos, but this one works very well for me.

I skied with The SKI COACH for the last two days, and it worked. I've been leaning back toward the hill for many years, and many instructors have told me to stop doing that. Sure...I could do that if I didn't think about anything else I needed to do to ski well. I'm a natural klutz; not a natural athlete. I have poor kinesthetic awareness...I don't know where all my body parts are going unless I think about them, and then I'm not thinking of other things I need to keep in mind.

The SKI COACH is a simple way to tell myself that I'm not leaning back toward the hill. When I hear the steel balls clank inside the tube I know that I'm doing things right, and I am making better turns. When I make the balls clink at the right spot in the turns, my turns are sweet. The right spot depends on the radius of the turns and the pitch of the hill, and I know when the turns feel just right. As expected, the SKI COACH helps me do much better on steeps. I was on some very steep pitches in 14" powder Thursday and Friday (http://www.crystalmt.com/) and my powder turns were better than ever.

I don't work for this outfit and don't know the maker; I paid full price. When the Mrs. and I perfect our turns, I'll sell it. Meanwhile, it works for me.
http://www.theskicoach.com/tsc/introduction.htm
http://www.theskicoach.com/tsc/faqs.htm


Ken
post #2 of 56
Lets hear it for another PMTS Ad...

Here is the source... http://www.realskiers.com/pmtsforum/viewtopic.php?t=900 and there is more over there, that was just one of the first mentions of it...
post #3 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Lets hear it for another PMTS Ad...
Click click.

Save the money, borrow a bamboo pole, ditch your poles. Hold the bamboo on top of your shoulders with both hands. Keep the boo level to the slope pitch. Just be careful riding with boo on the lift. And remember to return it where you borrowed it from.

As HH points out, there are times when this exercise will not get the job done. There are other times when it works like magic.
post #4 of 56

Better yet!

I'm workin on it as we speak.

I took a few of those old mercury thermostats and coupled them to a series of capacitors.

Each critical axis of each appendage and torso will be wired.

Any volunteers???
post #5 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
I'm workin on it as we speak.

I took a few of those old mercury thermostats and coupled them to a series of capacitors.

Each critical axis of each appendage and torso will be wired.

Any volunteers???

ooooo - wiill this give me feedback on limb position?

If so i'm willing to try...
post #6 of 56

testing ... 1 - 2 - tree

I gotta get the voltage or amps down, I'm not sure which?

Two cats up the tree and they won't come down till they get hungry.
post #7 of 56


I'm glad you are using cats not guinea pigs... they squeal so much...
post #8 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
borrow a bamboo pole, ditch your poles. Hold the bamboo on top of your shoulders with both hands. Keep the boo level to the slope pitch.
If that works for a person over a half-dozen or two dozen turns, and they keep it as their techique for ever, great. It doesn't work for me once I ditch the pole. I need many more repetitions and reminders while I'm using my ski poles all over the mountain. That's me, maybe not you, and the Ski Coach gizmo works for me.


Ken
post #9 of 56

devils advocate of course?

With little clanking balls to provide feedback you can get as much bad feed back as well as good feedback.

This sounds like someone made some vary basic devices from your basic "Cessna panel", flying the "ball".

However, there are a few problems with this. We do not ski down a flat inclined plane like a sheet of plywood, nor is it akin to an "established glide slope" of "X" degrees on approach.

Take a look a "the ball" when you are flying an approach when you are too high and the wings are rocking in a crosswind. Skid and slip and peg the ball.

The slope we ski on undulates and the necessary body position varies, far from perfect to accomodate in addition to pole position etc.

Such a device may be wrong as many times as it is right.
post #10 of 56
Yeah - I was thinking back to when I was told my position on my skis was rock solid... but rocks ski very poorly.....

Not the idea I would have picked as great... sort of encouraging going from one position to another position (same but other direction) rather than skiing arcs and constant movement.... or is that just me being weird? :
post #11 of 56
My mother just got a rotweiler/Shepard mix dog (sp? - sorry to lazy to look this one up). Picture a dog with the intelligance of a shepard and the attitude of a rotweiler. One of the only ways to train the dog to listen was to get a shock collar for him. To date he has only been shocked 3 times I think, but now when he hears the warning beep (remote control operated) he knows that he better stop what he is doing.

After seeing how well this worked on the dog, my first thoughts were: why can't this work on humans too? Imagine the possibilities... I figured this was as good a time as any to discuss its application to skiing. Rigging up a device to give you an electric shock every time the balls did not click, might get things working better... yes? We could also rig them up on every skier who takes lessons. Every time they do something wrong - REMIND THEM. All junior high ski club kids would be required to have them (and some highschoolers)... and anyone over 21 would be allowed to carry a remote that would be able to shock all of them at once if even one of them did something dumb.

We could even rig HH up with one and jolt him every time he said something stupid... with luck within a week he would have enough brain dammage so he would never open his mouth or post on an internet forum again...

Later

GREG

[Note: If you're offended you need one of these devices...]
post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Lets hear it for another PMTS Ad...

Here is the source... http://www.realskiers.com/pmtsforum/viewtopic.php?t=900 and there is more over there, that was just one of the first mentions of it...
Well, gee if it was mentioned on the PMTS forum it must be useless! I mean since noone who uses PMTS can ski worth a damn right?

The link to the web site was included in the original post. Funny thing, if you read the "Endorsements" page it lists...oh my gosh a PSIA guy, and several CSIA guys.....well heck maybe it DOES work after all.

http://www.theskicoach.com/

Some of you guys really need to get a life. Who needs electrical shocks when you can just ring the "PMTS bell" and get such a profound Pavlovian reaction.....
post #13 of 56
Hacks, was the word...

yeah... go PSIA... :



Later

GREG
post #14 of 56
I went ahead and purchased one of the devices since it was cheap and a new way of torturing PSIA instructors. I can tell you that you don't get false positive clinks and you can feel the clinks so you don't have to hear them. You have to level the shoulders and then maybe exaggerate some to get the clinks at slower speeds and at higher speeds, need to do things pretty efficient in order to get the clicks. You bank and you hear/feel nothing.

Sure takes the denial out of defensive instructors. They can get an honest opinion from the device while skiing alone. No need to eat crow.
post #15 of 56

alternative devices ..

Every Ski School should have one.

http:www.taser.com

Cuts the "learning curve in half .... or else !!
post #16 of 56
Snokarver was going to build me biofeedback ski boots to help me balance....

be good and get reward...be bad and get punished....
post #17 of 56
disski,

Maybe we can connect the biofeedback device to the taser.... Yeh, I like that. It appeals to my perverse side.
post #18 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy
If that works for a person over a half-dozen or two dozen turns, and they keep it as their techique for ever, great. It doesn't work for me once I ditch the pole. I need many more repetitions and reminders while I'm using my ski poles all over the mountain. That's me, maybe not you, and the Ski Coach gizmo works for me.


Ken
ok, then simply drag the downill pole in the snow before you use it for your next turn.

Ve hav (cheap) vays ov making u ski.

Und u vill like it.
post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square
disski,

Maybe we can connect the biofeedback device to the taser.... Yeh, I like that. It appeals to my perverse side.

thats what I was thinking :


thank goodness I outgre the original purpose of those biofeedback boots!
post #20 of 56
disski,

Which one, to YOUR or MY perverse side? Be careful. Remember how you answer this will reveal much about your personality. eh, eh, eh,
post #21 of 56
I think both
post #22 of 56
note to self ... must remember not to take T-square up on lesson offer...
post #23 of 56
FOFLMAO. Good shot lady, good shot!
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Click click.

Save the money, borrow a bamboo pole, ditch your poles. Hold the bamboo on top of your shoulders with both hands. Keep the boo level to the slope pitch. Just be careful riding with boo on the lift. And remember to return it where you borrowed it from.
then get two buckets full of water and attach them to the ends of the boo. Try to ski with the boo on your shoulder and get to the bottom without spilling any water. Only then, will you be a true ski fu master, daniel-son.
post #25 of 56
Guys, why so negative about The Ski Coach? I haven't tried it, but it does make sense that it would be useful for some folks. Many folks can't feel what they are doing, so having some other form of feedback is useful.

Many folks that I know also can't use the "hold a pole" drills and be successful, especially since stance and balance changes when your hands move to a different position.
post #26 of 56
ssh - for me anything to provide feedback would be a no brainer.... but it says
Quote:
Note:
The SKI COACHâ„¢ can be used by all levels of skier and works best in good snow conditions. High speeds, wind and hard pack snow will diminish sound quality.
Now I'm an aussie and we don't really have what you would call good snow conditions.... the "ice" that an instructor at the canyons was muttering about looked like my home trail but MUCH better covered (no trees or bushes in the middle... no rocks sticking out)....

hard pack - nearly every morning....
wind - remember the windy day at ESA? everyone saying how windy it was at the top? That is pretty common for me... it is ALWAYS windy and rarely still.... if I head to the top of the hill the chance of a free facial peel from bits of flying ice stuff are not that bad...

So it makes me think twice....
Then I think there are other ways to get this feedback that i know work for me (pole boxes for one) ....

so I think thrice...
and so the answer for me is no thanks... but I don't think I was being negative here... just playing with yuki and T-square re some of the alternatives (yes snokarver really did offer to rig my boots up)
post #27 of 56
Was he the same guy who concocted a similar devise to help golfers keep their head down through the swing? It was a strap that attached to the golfers head on one end, and on the other end hooked onto his ..........

Heard it really worked. Perhaps it's where he got the idea for the clacking balls. :
post #28 of 56
A device for telling you when your shoulders aren't level? How about just purchase a lesson? If you really need to carry something around, go visit the race team and tell them you'd like to volunteer to carry 20 rapid gates to the race hill. Hump those suckers over your shoulders like you're squatting 100 lbs, and it'll keep your upper body level and quiet. And the consequences for not being level and quite are a lot more severe than a clacking ball (well, I guess that depends on who's balls are getting clacked: )

I do like the idea of dog shock collars. I have a great story about those things....

I installed an electric underground fence about 12 years ago at my old house for my dog. It worked really well. A friend of mine moved to a new house near the water and had a Chesapeake Bay Retreiver who would end up at the dock every day, so he decided to install one of these fences also.

So, one July day, he takes off work and goes about the task of laying the wire in the ground. After spending a number of hours in the hot, humid, mid atlantic sunshine, installing this thing and getting it hooked up, he decided to see how it worked. At first, he put his fingers on the electrodes and let it shock him. No big deal he thought.... That's probably not going to keep the dog in the yard. But then he thought that maybe the skin on his fingers was too thick, so he put it on his upper arm and tried again. A bit better/stronger, but not too bad.

So, for his third try, he put it around his neck and crawled up to the fence line. The collar hit him like a ton of bricks. He fell over and started peeing himself! : Then, he started hearing bells. Well, not actually bells, but the beeping of the collar as it warned that you were too close and was charging up for another hit. It hit him again. Luckily, he remained conscious, and was able to roll far enough away that it stopped, but he thought he kept hearing bells. This time it was the phone. He made it to the phone when it rang again a few minutes later. It was his wife, asking how the fence installation was going. I think she peed herself too when she heard his story.

The insult-to-injury to all this is that a Chessie has much thicker skin than a person (they swim in 30 degree water... and like it), so about a week after he installed the fence, while he was at work, he got a call from the dockmaster that his dog was down at the docks again - DOH!!
post #29 of 56

JohnH

Wanted to post someting funny ... but my underwear .... is

I was tired late one night (3 am) while rebuilding our old house and just put a GFCI in. I was working on some electrical gizmo and said .... GFCI micro processor is so quick that ... anyway I had to try it. Ice cream was good for a few days; tongue burns are a bummer.
post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
...tongue burns are a bummer.
Yet another one filed under "stupid human tricks".
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