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Crouching (& sitting back) can be good..... - Page 6

post #151 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
Rather than bending forward at the waist to get under those, it's better to just do the LimBough.

:laugh: nah... then I would fall on my rather too well padded rear end......
post #152 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
there are, however, instances where/when bending forward at the waist, which most of us find ourselves working hard to break most of our pupils of, becomes desirable.
There's a distinct dichotomy in skiing which brings about two inverse principles to interchange according to the terrain/velocity.
these are absorption and extension.
thes eprinciples have everything to do with the positive points of bending forward at the waist......
Great! What are they?
post #153 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
Rather than bending forward at the waist to get under those, it's better to just do the LimBough.
Would that be sitting back or reverse crouching, Rick?
post #154 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Great! What are they?
Patience, Steve, patience. We're only 150-odd posts into that question so far.
post #155 of 167

note:

On a number of occasions Vlad has posted pics of his dog and cat ... (that ain't no house cat), that said.

What can a dog or cat do because they are so flexible that we can't, nor want to do?
post #156 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
What can a dog or cat do because they are so flexible that we can't, nor want to do?
Can't is easy,,, want is a personal issue.
post #157 of 167
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
On a number of occasions Vlad has posted pics of his dog and cat ... (that ain't no house cat), that said.

What can a dog or cat do because they are so flexible that we can't, nor want to do?
sometimes, the medium simply is the message.
you wanna ski like a cat, ya gotta study a cat.
and i don't mean no housecat, either.
it's all about dynamic spring.
post #158 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
Alaska Mike- How about this: There are no bad movements, just bad application of movements.

(vlad note: This is one of those attempts at diplomatic sure-all statements which really don't apply. skiing with one's hands on one's bindings, or holding one's leg out to the side while keeping one's hands over the eyes, are both, clearly, bad movements, regardless of application. let's avoid the quaint level II blanket-statement sophistry and stick with real skiing. there are, indeed, "bad movements".)

Alaska Mike- I'm certainly not going to teach sitting back and crouching as the foundation of good skiing.
(vlad note: nor am i, however, i will, and do, teach my pupils to utilize 'drive' in their skis, which , when they're skiing two-footedly, starts their turns in shovel-bias, and completes their turns in heel-bias. to the untrained, and invariably, then, judgemental eye, i'm teaching them to "sit back", which is NOT, in fact, the case.)

Alaska Mike- I'm going with the peanut gallery on this one, there's no way to win here- the game is fixed.
(when one makes inane blanket-statements such as "there are no bad movements", then, in fact, there IS no way to win. when one actually engages in thoughtful consideration of new concepts, winning shimmers brightly on one's horizon. it's on you to decide whether you want to languish in a world of blanket-statements and homogenized stancing for your pupils, or if you're open to new thinking and new teaching technique. hey- YOU said "there are no bad movements", not me. don't kill the messenger, claudius
Uhhhh... My certification comes from USSA, not PSIA. My approach probably has more in common with PMTS than PSIA, but I recognize the individual instructor has far more to do with the final product that the particular system their school follows. I am very much a progression-oriented teacher, to provide a certain common ground on which to build on later. However, being inflexible is not one of my major characteristics.

I stand by my statements. There's an application for everything- probably even the ones you mentioned. Who is being close-minded to new ideas now?
post #159 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan
vlad,

you're absolutely correct. i wasn't constructive at all. i am sorry. i contributed nothing and had no reason to disrespect you as i did. it was cheap.

not to qualify that - i was wrong - but i do think you'd do fine here stating your claim and letting it stand on its own, rather than the wag-the-carrot style. but maybe you have your reasons.

i wonder why, though, you don't think you can't say "here's why crouching/sitting back is good, or works, or has appication," present your case, and go from there.

anyway, i am glad you returned to the forum; i appreciate your input.

again, my apologies.
Wow, Ryan! Big man. Congrats! We need more like you.
post #160 of 167
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
Uhhhh... My certification comes from USSA, not PSIA. My approach probably has more in common with PMTS than PSIA, but I recognize the individual instructor has far more to do with the final product that the particular system their school follows. I am very much a progression-oriented teacher, to provide a certain common ground on which to build on later. However, being inflexible is not one of my major characteristics.

I stand by my statements. There's an application for everything- probably even the ones you mentioned. Who is being close-minded to new ideas now?
my point is that there's likely little 'application for' say, having the pupil don their skiis backward and wear a scarf over their faces. that's my point.
hate to bring it into the theattre of the absurd, but...
when we get into that pseudo-optimistic "hey! there's NO wrong way!" mode of thought, well, then, clearly, nothing any of our pupils do, even those whom can't turn, can be said to be incorrect.

you see my point, i'm sure.
there's a difference between open-mindedness and reckless acceptance of anything at all.
post #161 of 167
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
Uhhhh... My certification comes from USSA, not PSIA. My approach probably has more in common with PMTS than PSIA, but I recognize the individual instructor has far more to do with the final product that the particular system their school follows. I am very much a progression-oriented teacher, to provide a certain common ground on which to build on later. However, being inflexible is not one of my major characteristics.

I stand by my statements. There's an application for everything- probably even the ones you mentioned. Who is being close-minded to new ideas now?
what's with the 'uhhhhh', mikey?
in the post you quoted, i never said you were psia.
of course, looking at where US racing has found itself in the world arena,
i'm not sure i'd be crowing about ussa training if i were ever involved in it.
no offense intended toward you, just toward a quantifiably substandard system.
how'd the US do in alpine skiing, again?
maybe USSA should accaept that there ARE, in fact, wrong ways to do things on skiis.
then again, gold medals are overrated, anyway......
post #162 of 167
Ted and Julia did quite well, thank you.

Gee... in one set of races we didn't win them all. Yep, time to throw out the "system" we're using and ask good old vlad how to really ski well.
post #163 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
Patience, Steve, patience. We're only 150-odd posts into that question so far.
I wouldn't want my grandkids or kids to be such a jerk.
post #164 of 167
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
I wouldn't want my grandkids or kids to be such a jerk.

it's official, i've soiled my spyder GS pants

genius.crud



post #165 of 167
vlad,

Since being humbled by just witnessing great skiing, I can honestly say that I know of a very good reason for sitting back. I saw it. It works.

I would consider being able to do it a foundation skill. It is not as specific an application as one would think. You will be much faster and more efficient if you know how to do this and why/when it is to be done.

And there is no chance on earth that an instructor will tell you to do it, because they don't know why and will never be trained when it is appropriate to do it. That's something I know for sure...... Thus, please accept my apologies for my previous close-minded post.

While it is highly unlikely that an instructor will teach this, a race coach will certainly tell you about it, although I suspect only after you have the ability to adopt a well centered stance.

Is it fast? Watch Bode.
post #166 of 167
Vlad,

I also understand why the photos were of cats.

Well done.


This thread rates 5 stars.
post #167 of 167
Can you see an application of crouching/sitting back in when skiing SL/GS/SG/DH style turns or is it limited to moguls?
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