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Which Lange Boots for me?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm a fairly big guy- 6'3", 230lbs, who has very narrow feet.
I don't have the good fortune to ski more than a few days a year, but detest rental boots because I've never found a pair that could get close to fitting me correctly

For this reason, I've been trying to buy a pair of boots for the past 2-3 years, but living in Austin, TX, my brand options have always been very limited, and until now, hadn't found any that were a decent fit.

I was finally able to try on a pair of Lange CRL 90's and a pair of Lange Comp XX's (size 9.5), and I was amazed at how good they both fit.

The CRL 90's honestly felt like they were made for my foot right out of the box-- nice and tight, with no pinching at all--- (I didn't try to shell fit, which I will do before purchasing--- now that I've read how to do that here!). The Comp XX's also fit well, but they were a bit hard on my shin... still infinitely better than I've felt in anything by Nordica, Tecnica, Rossignol, or Salomon.

Now, here's the problem-- because of my size, I don't know if either of these are enough boot for me (I really want the CRL 90's)... I ski almost exclusively blues, some bumps, some powder, and some blacks when I'm feeling adventurous.

I've read that Comp 100's may be a better way to go for my size, but, since I wouldn't be able to try these on before buying, I don't know if it's worth taking the chance.

Any thoughts or suggestions from folks would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
post #2 of 15
The CRL 90 is WAY too soft for you, and, I'm afraid, the 100 will also be too soft.

Look towards the 120 Comp or the 130 World Cup (non-plug version).

I'm 5'11", 150 lbs, and I destroyed a set of 100's in less than a full season. You mileage will vary...but it's still too soft for you.
post #3 of 15
the comp boots have a bit differnt fit, but close. make sure it is the MF not LF fit, and make sure the shell fit is 1-2cm NO MORE.

Flex: make sure that it doesn;t feel like you can bottom the boot out in the store, just a bit less. It will stiffen in the cold, but ya CRL's are a bit soft for a bigger guy
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input. So, should I be pretty safe if I use the CRLs to determine the shell fit, and then get some Comp 120s in the same size? Since nobody in my area carries the Comp 120s, I'm going to have to pick them up online, and hope I've got the size right.

Again, I really appreciate the help!
post #5 of 15
Good lord! The guy skis a couple of times a year and you guys are suggesting comp 120's????

How screwed up is that?!
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
Good lord! The guy skis a couple of times a year and you guys are suggesting comp 120's????

How screwed up is that?!
Comp 120s are the softest "expert" boot I have ever tried. I don't think it is out of the realm of plausibility for a guy who weighs 230.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
Good lord! The guy skis a couple of times a year and you guys are suggesting comp 120's????

How screwed up is that?!
It's what I like to refer to as 'common sense'.

Suppose we were selling the gentleman a pickup truck to tow a rather heavy camper or boat. Even if he only tows it a couple times a year, he still needs a heavier, more powerful truck, simply because of the weight it has to bear. Now, turn pickup truck into 'ski boots', and 'tow a rather heavy' to 'is a large person who skis'.

If that doesn't put it into perspective, I don't know what will.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
I appreciate everyone's concern! Perhaps I should add a bit more background though...
While it is true that I don't get to do this as often as I'd like (my wife doesn't seem to understand that it's too D*MN hot if Texas most of the time, and won't let me move to ski country), I started skiing at 5, and averaged at least 1 trip per year since (I'm 34 now).
I choose to ski blues mostly because my ski companions have only been a few times, and I, due to my few days per year, would rather spend most of the time enjoying myself-- only occasionally do I feel the urge to really let loose.

So, since I can find Comp 120s for <300 bucks, I don't think it's too off the wall, as long as I can ski in them all day without the shooting pain I've become so used to in the past.
post #9 of 15
CLR size vs comp size is differnt (US vs mondo) find the boot sole lenght for the CRL and order the closest comp. Then go back and buy your boot fitter a beer for helping you
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by FanOZakk
It's what I like to refer to as 'common sense'.

Suppose we were selling the gentleman a pickup truck to tow a rather heavy camper or boat. Even if he only tows it a couple times a year, he still needs a heavier, more powerful truck, simply because of the weight it has to bear. Now, turn pickup truck into 'ski boots', and 'tow a rather heavy' to 'is a large person who skis'.

If that doesn't put it into perspective, I don't know what will.
Following that logic, he should be using race boots with GS skis for a slow cruise down the blues on the family outing. That's like taking the F1 car to pick up the milk.

Look at it this way: The centripetal force in a turn has magnitude F=0.5*m*v^2/r. So the force in the turn varies directly, with Mass, Inversely with turn radius, and WITH THE SQUARE OF THE SPEED.

So if I weigh 80 kg (176 lbs) vs 100 kg (220 lbs), the force goes up by 25%. This is the same amount that the forces will go down if you increase turn radiusfrom 16 to 20 m.

However, the 25 % force increase is the same as skiing just 12% faster. The boots are designed to handle much sharper turns than recreational skiers use, at speeds that are higher than most rec skiers can manage. Skiing twice as fast will give you 4 times the force, 3 times faster 9 times the force. Turning half the radius will double either of those. Now we're talking about stiffness requirements.

Frankly, the extra pounds takes a back seat to the speed of the turns.

Since he cruises blues with the family, and likes the odd mogul run (which is also better on softer boots) he will not generate the forces for which the race boot was designed.

In the opinion every high ranking instructor (level III and IV) and race coach at my home hill is that well over 90% of all skiers ski on boots that are far too stiff. The majority of these instructors/coaches have softened their boots -- none of them use race models, although some lower level coaches do since they were ex-racers and still use their old gear.

I weigh MORE than this guy and spent quite some time skiing comp 100's with BOTH heel bolts removed. I now use just one bolt. It's probably the same flex as the CRL 80 now.

The other issue I have with the comp series of boots from last year and older is the forward lean. Frankly, that amount of lean is unneccesary unless you are a racer.

The stiff boot is only helpful if you are cranking our short SL turns on hard snow through gates. Even Lemaster says softer boots for faster skiing and moguls.

The weight factor is just not that important.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
In the opinion every high ranking instructor (level III and IV) and race coach at my home hill is that well over 90% of all skiers ski on boots that are far too stiff. The majority of these instructors/coaches have softened their boots -- none of them use race models, although some lower level coaches do since they were ex-racers and still use their old gear.

I weigh MORE than this guy and spent quite some time skiing comp 100's with BOTH heel bolts removed. I now use just one bolt. It's probably the same flex as the CRL 80 now.
What type of skiing do you do?

I can't imagine that you spend ANY time on groomers to have that flex be even close to ideal.

Every coach I have had has used race boots...

To each their own I guess.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE

I weigh MORE than this guy and spent quite some time skiing comp 100's with BOTH heel bolts removed. I now use just one bolt. It's probably the same flex as the CRL 80 now.

The other issue I have with the comp series of boots from last year and older is the forward lean. Frankly, that amount of lean is unneccesary unless you are a racer.

The stiff boot is only helpful if you are cranking our short SL turns on hard snow through gates. Even Lemaster says softer boots for faster skiing and moguls.

The weight factor is just not that important.
I only weigh 150 lbs. and recently bought Comp 130's. I took the bolts out and completely bottomed the boot out on blue runs at moderate speed.
post #13 of 15
I don't need the support from the boot at moderate speeds. I can hold myself up and centered. In fact, I can do that pretty much everywhere....I put one bolt back in because I want to pressure the shovels a little bit more when I run gates.

Anyway, can anyone tell me what is the "ideal" flex and what makes it ideal?
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
Anyway, can anyone tell me what is the "ideal" flex and what makes it ideal?

my $.02

when you are standing, not in ski boots, feet shoulder width apart, feet forward (not out) flex your ankles, how far past your toes does the knee cap go?

that is how far you should flex a boot

So a person with less ankle flexsion should be in a stiffer boot

just like a mountain bike shock, you should use all the travel that you have, not just 60% of it or not bottoming it out every few minutes in a ride

BUT some gerneral ideas:

bigger people = more wieght to flex a boot so go stiffer

more aggersive skiers = stiffer boot

more groomed cruising = softer boot

in gereral go stiffer (you can always make a boot softer, harder to make stiffer)
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion
when you are standing, not in ski boots, feet shoulder width apart, feet forward (not out) flex your ankles, how far past your toes does the knee cap go?

that is how far you should flex a boot
Thanks. That makes very good sense. You don't want to squat with your knees past the toes, and you should not ski that way either.

When I advise folks on boots, I go for softer is better, because most folks do not ski in a centered/balance position, and a lot of that has to do with their boots. Softer lets them balance better.

I think that softer can be better if you do not ski so aggressively, and need to find your balance point. But once having found that, you could use a firmer grip on the ski to begin manipulating for and aft pressure. (you won't do it that if you are not in balance....)

I really think how hard a boot to recommend is really up to how the wearer skis, not what they ski or how heavy they are.

Anyway, thanks for that key tip.

Cheers!
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