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Self-mounting your bindings...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
How easy/safe is it to mount a new set of bindings into pre-existing holes from a similar binding? Mount pattern is from Salomon 900s, want to mount S914. thx.
post #2 of 19
Don't do it, period. It isn't easy and it isn't safe without the proper equipment and training.
post #3 of 19
....and NEVER remove the tags from your mattresses!

Also, oil changes on your car should ALWAYS be left to the professionals.

Always go to a tire shop to have them check the air pressure... they have specialized tools that are more accurate than the tire gauges commercially available.

I'll add some more suggestions later, but right now I have an appointment at the shoe store to have them install some new shoelaces for me.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer
I'll add some more suggestions later, but right now I have an appointment at the shoe store to have them install some new shoelaces for me.
And make sure they rotate them for you!!!

A 912 will fit the holes of a 900. Now depending on how the previous bindings were mounted is where the big questions start arising. Was it a center mount for the boots or a toe mount? How much is there in the heel track? is the forward pressure correct, let alone the DIN?

If these are questions that you can't answer, then it would probably be better bringing them to a shop.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
And make sure they rotate them for you!!!

A 912 will fit the holes of a 900. Now depending on how the previous bindings were mounted is where the big questions start arising. Was it a center mount for the boots or a toe mount? How much is there in the heel track? is the forward pressure correct, let alone the DIN?

If these are questions that you can't answer, then it would probably be better bringing them to a shop.
what about a 914? and wouldn't i be able to loosely mount the 914s and see where the boot falls?
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffr
Don't do it, period. It isn't easy and it isn't safe without the proper equipment and training.
i'm not looking at drilling my own holes. the holes are already there... and the current binding is set to my boot size. wouldn't i just use some glue or other adhesive to secure the screws?
post #7 of 19
If it was originally drilled for your boot sole, then you're all set. Use some white elmers glue if you want..... Usually I don't even use that if the ski has a metal topsheet. Don't use epoxy or construction adhesive.
Once the bindings are screwed on, all you need to do is set the forward pressure. If you don't know how, a rental shop guy at any ski area will probably do it for you in about 10 seconds.

As for the "proper equipment" jeffr is talking about..... that would be a screwdriver.
post #8 of 19
Install a toe piece (but don't torque it down tightly), push your boot toe snugly to the toe piece and look at the side of the ski/boot to see where the center reference mark on the side of your boot lines up with respect to the center mark of the ski. Is the boot center at the ski center, or ahead of it or behind it and how far?

If the ski uses boot toe reference for mounting (rather than boot center) then you should be all set for the toe piece (if they were mounted initially in the proper way) regardless of the new sole length and it just becomes a matter if there is adequate adjustment range in the heel piece. DAW
post #9 of 19
For the mechanically inclined its a breeze. For the rest of us not so easy.I mounted a Neox onto another Neox plate on a different ski last week, and as staright forward as this was before I was done I spent a couple of hours doing this simple task. I lost a screw in the process that I went to 3 hardware stores before I could find a replacement. Funniest thing was , I ended up with a blister on my hand from trying to be sure I got all the screws seated in well enough. Its done and I saved myself a couple of bucks, but also have the satisfaction I did something for myself.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
....and NEVER remove the tags from your mattresses!

Also, oil changes on your car should ALWAYS be left to the professionals.

Always go to a tire shop to have them check the air pressure... they have specialized tools that are more accurate than the tire gauges commercially available.

I'll add some more suggestions later, but right now I have an appointment at the shoe store to have them install some new shoelaces for me.
Maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't touch my bindings if I didn't know if I should use glue or not when installing them, or if they would fit in the hole, etc. No offense to Glen, but a guy who constantly ask if old RX15 from Kästle are any good doesn't sound like someone with a lot of experience working around and with skis : I know we all gotta start somewhere, but binding installation and adjustement is not where I'd recommend starting.

PS: I do all my car work at home, and all my tuning, except stone-grinding for obvious reasons () but wouldn't dream of installing bindings myself. Yes, I let pros do it (not talking about the stoner guy with the Molly Hatchet t-shirt here). But maybe it's because many, many, many shops will mount used or loose bindings for FREE around here.

PPS: I've seen homemade jobs rip apart under force of an intermeditate skiing a blue run. Never saw a binding mounted by the only guy I let touch my skis do that, and he has worked with hundreds of racers.
post #11 of 19
Dude, this isn't exactly rocket science. The holes are drilled and tapped, and they are in the right place. All he has to do is screw the screws in.

How could it even be possible to mess that up????
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer
Once the bindings are screwed on, all you need to do is set the forward pressure. If you don't know how, a rental shop guy at any ski area will probably do it for you in about 10 seconds.
For the Salomons, maybe the nice rental shop guy will show you how to adjust the wings & downward pressure too

Seriously, while none of this is Rocket Science(tm), it pays to know what you are doing with any given binding. If you are not sure, have someone who knows it well show it to you and explain it to you...
post #13 of 19
I'm just a dumb girl and I mounted my own bindings. The holes were already drilled and tapped so I lined em up and was ready to ski in less than 1/2 hr. A friend nagged me that I shouldn't have done that so I finally gave in and went to a shop to have them checked(didn't tell him that I mounted them myself) he checked them out and said all was good!
post #14 of 19
Should be real easy in pre-existing holes, as long as the previous installer did not over-tighten or strip the holes. Screw the new bindings in with some white glue, and do not over-tighten the screws!!
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
i appreciate all the responses. very helpful indeed! to clear up some things, though:

the S914s are on my K2 4's and were set by the ski shop. the ski i'm looking at buying was mounted with salomon 900S bindings drilled for 327mm boots, my boot is 325mm.

also, regarding forward pressure... is that like where you push a screw driver into the plastic piece on the toe-piece and then move the little yellow bar to the new numbers? I'm kidding

i'm pretty sure re: forward pressure, the 914 has a somewhat idiot-proof system where you mount the boot in the binding and look to make sure that the little "arrows" on the back metal piece fall within the specified "notch" range.

thx again.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer
....and NEVER remove the tags from your mattresses!

Also, oil changes on your car should ALWAYS be left to the professionals.

Always go to a tire shop to have them check the air pressure... they have specialized tools that are more accurate than the tire gauges commercially available.

I'll add some more suggestions later, but right now I have an appointment at the shoe store to have them install some new shoelaces for me.
Absolutely hilarious!
post #17 of 19
Thanks, I was kinda cracking myself up while typing it.......
post #18 of 19
Go ahead; it's not like you have to worry about a warranty. Just, make sure you use the proper torque. It's pretty easy to strip threads. , and you don't want them coming off.
post #19 of 19
Installing the bindings should not be a problem for anyone who can use a screwdriver properly.

However, I'd still bring the bindings into a shop to get the releases checked - that's something that you can't do at home.
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