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Single-foot drills- front-to-back motion?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Doing single-foot slow skiing, I find myself needing to push the stance leg forward when I transition to the outside edge.

???:
post #2 of 12
Comprex,

Do you mean the new inside edge? Doing one ski skiing, it helps to keep making the "usual" moves with the leg not on the snow. While on one ski, the fore/aft movements of the ski relative to the body should be the same with respect to tip lead changes on two skis.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
Comprex,

Do you mean the new inside edge?
rusty, it is the new inside edge, but it is also the one facing the outside of the hip.

Quote:
While on one ski, the fore/aft movements of the ski relative to the body should be the same with respect to tip lead changes on two skis.
If I understand you correctly, in positioning the one ski I am attempting to mimic it's position when both are skied? F'so, I didn't think I had this severe a counter rotation problem.
post #4 of 12
So if you are skiing on your right leg, on the completion of your left turn and starting a right turn, you are shifting from the left edge of the right ski to the right edge of the right ski. It's at this point that you need to move the ski forward?
post #5 of 12
Fear?
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
It's at this point that you need to move the ski forward?
Yes. Never less than an inch.

BigE, maybe.
I do it with skate crossovers too, so I was suspecting a shoulder problem.
post #7 of 12
Comprex,

That does seem weird. Are you not flexing your ankle during the turn initiation?
post #8 of 12
Comprex, it has to do with attempting to supinate the foot to make it easier to engage and balance on the little toe edge. What you're doing effectively does that.
post #9 of 12
comprex,

Quote:
Doing single-foot slow skiing, I find myself needing to push the stance leg forward when I transition to the outside edge
It sounds like you are "over flexing" your ankle while doing the inside edge turn. Stay more over the middle of your ski while turning on the inside edge and use more planar flexion. While transioning to the outside edge turn, open your ankle joint, and slowely flex to the outside of the boot cuff as you turn.
Dorsi flexion on outside edge, planar flexion on the inside edge.

You may want to start by only keeping a little of your weight on the other (unused ski) and then when on only one ski, keep the other ski close to the ski on the snow.

RW
post #10 of 12
Along with what Rick and Ron said, add to that, that you may not be getting your CM across the ski enough to engage the new turning edge. If you are heavy into the front of the boot (over flexed), it's harder to supinate the ankle enough to get to the new edge. Plus, those muscles are generally not very stron in relation to the the muscles used to pronate. Since the ankle won't move as far or as easily, you'd need to move the body mass further.

Obviously, it's more efficient and will keep you better balanced if it happens in down low in the foot than moving the whole CM, but maybe a combination of the two. Be a little less flexed, but still on the tongue of the boot, and move across a little more.

This may also point to an alignment issue. Take some video of you straight running directly at the camera and see if, when you flex, your knees move in and your skis to their inside edges. This will happen if you don't have enough dorsi flexion for your boot setup. You might also be able to do this by standing on your skis on pillows (soft surface) indoors. Put some pillows under your skis at the boots and also toward the front of the skis. Maybe do this in front of a full length mirror. Watch your knees as you flex forward in a normal skiing position. The advantage to doing this indoors is that you can do it with shorts on and see your knees better than if you were in ski pants.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Along with what Rick and Ron said, add to that, that you may not be getting your CM across the ski enough to engage the new turning edge.
This is how I read BigE's 'fear' comment, and it's certainly possible.
Quote:
If you are heavy into the front of the boot (over flexed), it's harder to supinate the ankle enough to get to the new edge. Plus, those muscles are generally not very stron in relation to the the muscles used to pronate.
Yep. I've notoriously weak ankles.

Quote:
You might also be able to do this by standing on your skis on pillows (soft surface) indoors. Put some pillows under your skis at the boots and also toward the front of the skis. Maybe do this in front of a full length mirror. Watch your knees as you flex forward in a normal skiing position. The advantage to doing this indoors is that you can do it with shorts on and see your knees better than if you were in ski pants.
And no truly flat mirrors. Looks like they track pretty straight though.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
This is how I read BigE's 'fear' comment, and it's certainly possible.
You are not alone. And we are built to behave that way. Apparently, there are more proprioceptors on the outside edges of our feet. I suspect that is to ensure that we know when we are in danger of falling over....
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Single-foot drills- front-to-back motion?