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Warm weather wax

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I usually use an all purpose wax because I never know what conditions will be like the next time I get out to ski.

Yesterday, I had a fun day skiing in 55 degree temperature with previously applied Cold weather wax. It was like skiing on velcro. It made zipperlining bumps easy (since I can't ordinarilly do that), but every thing else was scary. Never knew when my skis would come to a sudden stop.

For future reference, without being able to plan ahead (for a 55 degree day in February) are there any last minute, quick fixes possible?

Thanks.
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork
For future reference, without being able to plan ahead (for a 55 degree day in February) are there any last minute, quick fixes possible?

Thanks.
Scrape and brush more than usual, then Zardoz.
post #3 of 15

quick fix

Wire brush (or scotch bright) the bases in a cross hatch pattern

break the sticktion

CalG
post #4 of 15
Ivory soap in a crosshatch.
post #5 of 15
Somebody mentioned carrying some Swix F4 paste. Could this be put on over cold temperature/all temperature wax? You know, in an emergency?
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tief schnee
Ivory soap in a crosshatch.
Is that for real? How long would that last?
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork
Is that for real? How long would that last?
For supper wet conditions, yes.

I Just returned to the east after a 10 year break so I forget how long it lasts.
post #8 of 15
I'd do a hot scrape with parafin, then put on a layer of parafin for future watersports outings.
post #9 of 15
Why on earth in NJ/PA area would you have applied a cold weather wax, especially this year?

Just stick with the mid-temp fluro ... if you want to get nuts for the spring stuff, you can do a base with the fluro and then hit a light coat of graphite for an overlay.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork
I usually use an all purpose wax because I never know what conditions will be like the next time I get out to ski.

Yesterday, I had a fun day skiing in 55 degree temperature with previously applied Cold weather wax. It was like skiing on velcro. It made zipperlining bumps easy (since I can't ordinarilly do that), but every thing else was scary. Never knew when my skis would come to a sudden stop.

For future reference, without being able to plan ahead (for a 55 degree day in February) are there any last minute, quick fixes possible?

Thanks.
For temps that warm... most any wax will feel sticky. Especially when you hit the real, real wet spots... where you feel like you are going to get thrown/ejected from your skis.

Once it gets that warm... you are SOL.

Just ask any that has gone to a race camp in the summer at Hood or Whistler... once mid morning hits the snow is so warm you are done.

I like the post on Ivory... never used it myself... heard of others doing it. Another couple of stange ones... Downy and Rain-X. All three of these would not be so good for your bases though.

Ski Fast - Alex
post #11 of 15

warm temp wax

Swix ch 10.
post #12 of 15
The really quick fix is Zardoz. Let it "soak in" for a little while. It hates water. Won't last super long, but you can apply in 120 seconds in the parking lot. Shove the puck in your pocket and do it again if you need to.

A good base structure/pattern makes life better too.
post #13 of 15
If you are looking for a quick fix that you can apply at the mountain, Zardoz works. It won't last that long when applied over a hard cold wax, but it will get you moving. F4 paste wax also can help, but it sticks when you get into wet mushy snow where Zardoz still glides. Swix sells a spray-on liquid flouro Express Wax which also works reasonably well in warm temps. The best warm wax I have used is an all-temp molybdenum hot wax that I found in the Tognar catalog a couple of years ago. It lasts a long time and is good up to about 50 degrees.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimL
The best warm wax I have used is an all-temp molybdenum hot wax that I found in the Tognar catalog a couple of years ago. It lasts a long time and is good up to about 50 degrees.
TOKO moly all-temp! Love the stuff for slushy XC days; crayons on really well and lasts much longer than Z.
post #15 of 15
I've used the Ivory soap trick. I works but only for a run or so, depends on how long the runs are.

I also have used some Toko stuff in a tube, but that also was years ago. Still have it around somewhere.

Lately the Hyperzoom has worked fine.
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