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"Floating" Ski at high speed

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am new this forum, but it looks great. I am hoping that someone can help me eliminate a technique problem. When I am in a straight and fairly flat run out section my left (and sometimes right) ski floats. This only happens at a decent speed (35 mph +), but it is really un-nerving. Is there anything i can do to reduce or eliminate this. I know it is partially a balance/pressure issue on the ski, but as shift weight from one ski to the other, it just shifts the float from one ski to another. Thanks!
post #2 of 22
I've experienced a similar circumstance, especially when making quick turns at relatively high speed, if my focus gets too much on the outside ski of the turns. It reminds me of the importance of involving BOTH skis all the time, even though there may be a pressure differential.
post #3 of 22
try to keep the weight 50/50 instead of shifting your weight. Then apply a little bit of cuff pressure (Not levered, but just a touch) Apply the cuff pressure at 10:00 and 2:00 (on the clock face if the tips of your skis are 12:00) and make very gentle turns (almost straight)

DC
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply. I definitly try to keep things 50/50. The cuff pressure and gently turns is a great tip. I'll try that.
post #5 of 22
In my experience it's this simple:

Skis don't 'float' if the edges are engaged.

(Pretty much what dchan said, I think.)
post #6 of 22
edges engaged (even if verrrrrry slightly) with a little bit of foot guiding and those skis will feel much more stable.
post #7 of 22
Ditto on the edges. Thise flat run outs are also a good time to goof around with shallow, low edge angle arc-to-arc turns without killing any speed. The more sidecut your skis have, the more they will wander around on you when they are flat on the snow.
post #8 of 22
I actually find my skis get a bit squirrelly when the run out or cat track has a certain sheen to it like satin, but a different day it won't be an issue at all. I just start making sure to engage edges.
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
I took several years off from skiing. When I came back to the sport, I bought shaped ski's (ya I know, I was behind the times) and it has been a bit of an adjustment in some respects... It happens on the cat tracks when the snow is like satin. Never really thought about the satin aspect of it until sibhusky said something. I assure you thou, when you hit the snow at 30+, it doesn't feel like satin. It feels more like Satan haha.
post #10 of 22
As stated above, use both skis alike, with a little more softness on the inside ski. A flat ski will misbehave with shaped skis, so with one edged and one flat, watch out.

RW
post #11 of 22
I ran into a similar problem when I brought my slalom skis on a trip to Utah last year. We don't have the long cat tracks and runouts back east so I didn't have that experience on these skis. My skis felt really squirrley on those long runouts. Short shaped skis don't want to run straight. I ended up doing gentle turns back and forth to keep them from wanting to turn and catching an edge.
post #12 of 22
It could also be a slight alignment issue. Being able to ride both skis flat on the snow shouldn't be all that un-nerving. If you are feeling un-nerved it might be because the equipment is slightly off.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Ditto on the edges. Thise flat run outs are also a good time to goof around with shallow, low edge angle arc-to-arc turns without killing any speed. The more sidecut your skis have, the more they will wander around on you when they are flat on the snow.
My slalom skis wander around like a loose fire hose if they're not on edge at speed.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
My slalom skis wander around like a loose fire hose if they're not on edge at speed.
With a 0.5 degree base bevel they'll have that tendency.

If it is really upsetting, switch to a 2 or 3 degree base bevel. That'll fix it for sure!
post #15 of 22
They're the WC SCs with a 1 degree base. My SGs have a 0.5 base bevel, and they don't mind going straight at any speed. Maybe I should run the slaloms flat .
post #16 of 22
double post
post #17 of 22
If you are straightlining, floating is a good thing. A flat ski is faster than an edged ski. Try to get both skis to float. Try doing it at 80 mph, just to get an idea of what a World Cup Downhill is like. I bet that would be enough to keep get Tanner Hall to keep his mouth shut.

BK
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
My slalom skis wander around like a loose fire hose if they're not on edge at speed.
I dropped into a tuck on my 172 race skis with 0 degree base (.4mm recessed edge) and 2.5 degree side bevel. Scary is the word that comes to mind. The tuck lasted about 5 seconds before was too scared to keep them off their edges.
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH
Ditto on the edges. Thise flat run outs are also a good time to goof around with shallow, low edge angle arc-to-arc turns without killing any speed. The more sidecut your skis have, the more they will wander around on you when they are flat on the snow.

Yeah, I would be curious to know what skis Juneauboy is on. Some skis are definitely a lot worse than others in this regard. Wide tips and narrow waisted skis seem to be worse and need slight edge pressure at all times for stability.
post #20 of 22

And here I thought

It was some fault on me!

The RC4 Race SC's do ride flat just like a fire hose.

I do keep the base angle at 0 so I have learned to accept.

Response and catastrophy ride a fine line.

CalG
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Volkl Vertigo G3.190.. 2003 model. I like the ski, they have an amazing sweet spot and are very responsive in all terrain types. Today at the mountain was amazing... little icy, but the groomed stuff was fast and the bumps hard and fast. I don't think I was applying enough pressure on my cuff and the tiny bit of edging really helped. I do need to get the gear re-dialed in. I had serious boot issues last year and had to switch boots. So, the new boots haven't really been dialed in as of yet.
post #22 of 22
Do your boots fit like a tight glove? You need that at speed. Are the boots correctly aligned both fore & aft and canted? You need that at top speed. Are the bindings actually in the best spot on the skis, regardless of the markings? All these items are very important.


ken
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