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MA - MRG Why the hell not

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
First 3 clips are of me(I have the hooded jacket on)
Rest is of my friend go head and tell me what you see

http://www.autoxphotos.com/other/mrg-1776.wmv

BTW this at MRG so yeah its just about the toughest skiing there is on this coast. But i notice in the first shot of myself compared to the other video a nice crossunder move, with less chucking of the hip from last time.
post #2 of 20
Wow I really enjoyed that! Where you lack in upper-end expert skills, you more than make up for it with athleticism and sheers guts. Your skiing in that video is VERY impressive, because it shows that you don't need to be a hot shot Level III instructor or examiner to be able to handle expert terrain.

Lots of people would be uncomfortable in that terrain (including me) and would ski it much slower, if at all. Strong skiing, in my opinion.
post #3 of 20
Fun.
What is the music?
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
Your skiing in that video is VERY impressive, because it shows that you don't need to be a hot shot Level III instructor or examiner to be able to handle expert terrain.
Very true, I will take it a steo further and say that the majority of people who can handle that terrain are not PSIA certified at all... many are excellent skiers (to the level of a good instructor) without ever setting foot near the certification process. It saddens me that many here think that a PSIA L3 pin = expert skier, and without it you couldn't possibly be an expert skier...

Later

GREG

BTW, good skiing. It looks like you're having a blast.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
thanks for the kind words, the music is RJD2 -1976.

Tree skiing all day long requires stuff PSIA does not addvocate or teach. my stemming is almost neal now, but still there in my friends skiing. John Egan skis the same way "I like to ski with my toes in cause if my tips make through the trees at least my ass will too"
post #6 of 20
Bushwacker, Thanks "RJD2-1776"
That was a different language to me.
But i found it. (It is "1976")
Looked like a fun day of skiing.
post #7 of 20

misinformation alert

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA
Tree skiing all day long requires stuff PSIA does not addvocate or teach.
huh? PSIA? The last PSIA clinic I was in went into the trees. There might not be a lot of written material specific to tree skiing from PSIA and PSIA does not advocate or teach tree skiing to the general public. But PSIA certainly does teach tree skiing to its members. Look for the trees and steeps clinic descriptions on this PSIA-E page.

Would you care to provide some specific examples of what is required that PSIA does not teach?
post #8 of 20
I continue to be impressed and enjoy your skiing and your great enthusiasm. It's easy to loose track that a very important component of being an excellent skier is going off piste and skiing difficult terrain and conditions well.

It appears you enjoy this aspect of sking as much or more as making carve turns on the groomed, as I remember one of your earlier videos was skiing in the glades at Jay. How are those B5 edges and bases holding up when you go"exploring" ?

I skied at MRG once when I was probably about your age. Got my butt kicked and actually got injured up there in a pretty bad fall. Ski It If You Can really applies to that mountain.
post #9 of 20
Great skiing.

That was one of the best double ejections I've seen in a while. Nice!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
The last PSIA clinic I was in went into the trees. There might not be a lot of written material specific to tree skiing from PSIA and PSIA does not advocate or teach tree skiing to the general public. But PSIA certainly does teach tree skiing to its members. Look for the trees and steeps clinic descriptions on this PSIA-E page.
Yeah, I agree . . . Gore runs a trees and steeps PSIA clinic every year, and our examiner there rips trees just about as well as anybody.

Quote:
It saddens me that many here think that a PSIA L3 pin = expert skier, and without it you couldn't possibly be an expert skier...
That does seem to be an opinion shared by many. I'd have to say that a great majority of PSIA L3's are expert skiers. I've seen some that I wonder how they got the pin, but I'd imagine that most L3's (especially ones that attained the certification recently) can rip those trees easy.

However, I don't think that even the most hardcore of PSIA people thinks that without a level III pin you can't be a ripper. You really think the majority of skiers at Alta or MRG or Jackson have level III pins? Because I've been to those mountains, and there are some guys there that give the demo team a run for their money (in the skiing department - obviously not teaching). In fact, the very fact that these guys don't teach skiing might help further their ability. They spend all their time skiing the most difficult lines in the most sketchy conditions, and don't need to travel to Mount Podunk, CT to lead a clinic full of overzealous ski instructors wanting to know what the best angle is for a base edge bevel.
post #11 of 20
Expert skiing is not about pins but about good skiing. Some "experts" that don't have the efficient movement patterns in their skiing can make it up with athletics or strength. Others are more technique or balance rather than strength. Some is just "guts". One of the things in the L3 teaching is knowing that you will encounter skiers that are just better than you coming to take lessons. The ability to see and teach more efficient movement patterns does not mean we all can do them well. Because a high level student skis better than a pin does not mean we can't teach them something. We do have to be honest with the student however. This is the student/teacher partnership. If that gets in the way of a good lesson, it's time to give up the teaching gig..

As most of my examiners and mentors have told me, If and when I get that gold pin, Then I can really begin to learn! Forever a student! That's me...
post #12 of 20
And by the way, Nice skiing!
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattchuck2
Yeah, I agree . . . Gore runs a trees and steeps PSIA clinic every year, and our examiner there rips trees just about as well as anybody.



That does seem to be an opinion shared by many. I'd have to say that a great majority of PSIA L3's are expert skiers. I've seen some that I wonder how they got the pin, but I'd imagine that most L3's (especially ones that attained the certification recently) can rip those trees easy.

However, I don't think that even the most hardcore of PSIA people thinks that without a level III pin you can't be a ripper. You really think the majority of skiers at Alta or MRG or Jackson have level III pins? Because I've been to those mountains, and there are some guys there that give the demo team a run for their money (in the skiing department - obviously not teaching). In fact, the very fact that these guys don't teach skiing might help further their ability. They spend all their time skiing the most difficult lines in the most sketchy conditions, and don't need to travel to Mount Podunk, CT to lead a clinic full of overzealous ski instructors wanting to know what the best angle is for a base edge bevel.
I can tell you that I do not even know what PSIA is or means. I would guess its some sort of ski teaching style or technique. I took a few lessons at Mt Tom when I was 10 and none since then. Myself and my friend George where the two people who guided Bushwacker and his friend through those trees. We had to work in the afternoon when they shot the vids so are not in them. Can I have a level 3 pin? One thing we think is funny is one of Georges relatives got him a private lesson at Mad River for Christmas: But seriously we are waiting for a good day to cash it in and have them show us even more hidden stashes that we don't know about. Of course any and all tips on skiing are always appreciated

As for Bush and his friend they both skied very well and were a pleasure to ski with:

Alfonse
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
huh? PSIA? The last PSIA clinic I was in went into the trees. There might not be a lot of written material specific to tree skiing from PSIA and PSIA does not advocate or teach tree skiing to the general public. But PSIA certainly does teach tree skiing to its members. Look for the trees and steeps clinic descriptions on this PSIA-E page.

Would you care to provide some specific examples of what is required that PSIA does not teach?
Why would they not teach tree sking to the general public? Last I saw when people usually die when skiing it is when they are screaming down a groomer at 30 and something goes wrong leading them into trees at high speeds. To back that Mad River has never had a single fatality. For example at the speed they were skiing in the woods here if they ate bark they would be unhappy, and might break something, but as long as they have a helmet on thats the most that would happen. Don't get me wrong, I don't really want the general public tracking up all the woods but I just think this is odd.

Alfonse
post #15 of 20
I love a good "rumbah" as well as any man.

But, could you do something about that skiing?

Skiing = good. Score .... 8.6

"Latin dooh dah .... Score .... 2.5
post #16 of 20
I personally like freeskiers with some sort of strong technical background, usually racing or bump skiing. Nothing against those who don't, it's just a style perference. If you are a riping freeskier without any technical training, I would suggest trying a race program or something, it rounds out your skills.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
Why would they not teach tree sking to the general public?
Because they are an instructor certification and education organization. They don't teach anything to the general public.
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star
I personally like freeskiers with some sort of strong technical background, usually racing or bump skiing. Nothing against those who don't, it's just a style perference. If you are a riping freeskier without any technical training, I would suggest trying a race program or something, it rounds out your skills.
eh yeah totally agreed I run GS or SL gates every weekend.

The B5 are one of the most durable skis I have had pleasure of owning, sure the edgesget dulled but they are built like tanks. The bases take alot to get a core shot, the majority of the time you can ski right over dead fall with nothing more than surface scratches. The edges will need tuned before the deep freeze this friday night down here in PA, after the warm up.

On the psia comment. I am just saying that down here on my home mountian the general conseses of my "high ups" is that groomed skiing is the only thing around, and tree skiing is too risky to yourself and equiment. I say I ski to have fun and that the most fun for me. I take all the precaution I think I should, and go rip. I allways seek out the "best" or "worst"(it depend on your piont of view). I know this will make some of the patrols mad, but down here in PA. I ski closed runs cause what makes them closed is what makes them interesting and fun to myself. Bare spots, gaps over bare spots, shitty ass snow, and chutes created by lack of snow, are all much more fun to ski than groomed black or blue run down here.

With that said I will have more video soon probably from Blue Knob, PA in like a week or so.
post #19 of 20
Fun video, but why does PSIA always come up. I am so sick of hearing about BS PSIA, cant we leave there crap out of just one conversation. I hate the money hungry PSIA , BLAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH down with PSIA

Thanks for the video man
post #20 of 20

No lessons here

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
One thing we think is funny is one of Georges relatives got him a private lesson at Mad River for Christmas: But seriously we are waiting for a good day to cash it in and have them show us even more hidden stashes that we don't know about. Of course any and all tips on skiing are always appreciated
Um....Al....I traded in the lessons for a pair of brandy-spakin' new Fritschi Freerides. I guess we'll just have to keep finding the good stashes the old fashioned way. (by picking up lifties hitchhiking!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
As for Bush and his friend they both skied very well and were a pleasure to ski with:
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