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Use of Poles - Page 3

post #61 of 68
vlad, your comments fall along the lines of what a "coach" would say versus what an "instructor" would say. The two are very different. Coaches seem to tell it like it is, instructors, well... they dress up their comments in something that doesn't look bad to those who are receiving them. I prefer the "coach" method (less BS and more fixing the problems that exist)... it actually might be an interesting read to compare and contrast the two in another thread...
Later
GREG
post #62 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
vlad, your comments fall along the lines of what a "coach" would say versus what an "instructor" would say. The two are very different. Coaches seem to tell it like it is, instructors, well... they dress up their comments in something that doesn't look bad to those who are receiving them. I prefer the "coach" method (less BS and more fixing the problems that exist)... it actually might be an interesting read to compare and contrast the two in another thread...
Later
GREG
as should be the case, ebing this is an online forum, as opposed to a lesson. in a lesson, the student would have the advantage of my exaggerated demos, which are far more effective than verbal commands and physics lessons.
were we in the field, so to speak, you'd be shocked at how much differently i run a lesson than what i type here. the very best lessons an instructor will teach are to deaf people or thoise whom do not speak the instructor's langauge.
my own best lessons have been those which i taught to hungarian and romanian pupils, as i understand so little, if any, of their respective languages.
coaching's verbal, (great) instructing is largely visual.
i've professionally done both, and competed, for 29 years.
post #63 of 68
If you want the Official Word (from the PSIA Web site) it is the following:

Pole Use/Arm Movements

Functional pole use can be used to help the skier secure/maintain the present turn or initiate the next turn.

Effective pole use requires discipline and accuracy of arm/hand movements.

Effective pole use requires a pole swing but not always a pole plant.

The skier uses a disciplined upper body and core position to position the arms;
conversely, excessive movements of the arms can shift the upper body out of position.

A linear/direct pole swing will help to accurately guide movements into the new turn.

This is taken verbatum from the PSIA website. If you want to argue about it, don't do it with me, as I have nothing to do iwth it!
post #64 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
thanks. i honestly do not care if people read it or not. the overwhelming flood of PMs and now emails thanking me for the advice i've posted on this site is gratifying enough.

sometimes vinegar filters out the stronger bees from the weak ones.
the honey-eaters are a dime-a-dozen.
keep up.
LOL , toot, toottoot, toot

I bet it is.
post #65 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
as should be the case, ebing this is an online forum, as opposed to a lesson. in a lesson, the student would have the advantage of my exaggerated demos, which are far more effective than verbal commands and physics lessons.
were we in the field, so to speak, you'd be shocked at how much differently i run a lesson than what i type here. the very best lessons an instructor will teach are to deaf people or thoise whom do not speak the instructor's langauge.
my own best lessons have been those which i taught to hungarian and romanian pupils, as i understand so little, if any, of their respective languages.
coaching's verbal, (great) instructing is largely visual.
i've professionally done both, and competed, for 29 years.

Oh well - lucky you never hit me asa student then.... they gave me an instructor who specialised in teaching blind skiers for a reason..... blind skiers do not copy when instructors says "just do this"
post #66 of 68
Best use of your poles are to lean on them in a long lift line
post #67 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube
I played w/this a little yesterday. Stayed on groomers as I was also getting the feel of my boots since being tweaked a bit (wow, what a difference!). This exercise was interesting and fun to play with. Consistency is really key for me so I have to keep at it now. Thanks for the suggestion, RicB, and I'll make sure to remember this tip on all terrain, groomed or otherwise.
You're welcome SugerCube. Pole use is rarely neutral. I tell my students that poles are either helping us or hurting us. In fact, I don't teach any use of poles until a student has a solid open parallel turn. Then it starts to become usefull to their advancement.

The clock face is a good one to use to start feeling how the poles can influence our movements across the skis and into the next turn, both positively and negatively.

Got some boot tweaks eh? Good on you. later, RicB.
post #68 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier



Poles shouldn't be used as a crutch, but rather a tool that serves a purpose.

GREG

This is true. But I find that it's nice to have a crutch when you need one. Of course that never happens to me.:
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