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Wristguards and falling

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
So.. Wristguards... should I be using them?... If not, what's the safest way to fall?.. I know in skiing I usually prefer to fall on my side if I need to fall.. (because falling forward sounds crazy and backwards would mean I'd never get back up...) What about snowboarding?
post #2 of 6
Some rental shops will always issue wristguards when they rent boards and boots to beginners. When I learned snowboarding, we all got them. I managed to put them on backwards of course. Useful things, as in boarding you do fall forward. On skis, it's very hard and I can't imagine needing wristguards. They would make holding poles quite tricky, too.
post #3 of 6

Wristgaurds...falling etc

This has always been an active / re-occuring forum theme. Typically my stance on this is..not to use wrist gaurds. However when it comes down to what the customer wants to do...I say ultimately it's their choice. As for most of us here in this forum I hope that we all know the logic behind not using them.

In regards to falling / teaching how to fall ...oh man this is a resort specific can of worms. Depending on which resort I've worked at..it ranged anywhere from don't go there, only teach if it happens, to teach how to properly fall.

Sounds pretty crazy to me teaching somebody to snowboard then only to possibly skate around the issues of falling...

Anyone else?
post #4 of 6
jonpole,

Check through the hips and tailbone pads thread. Phil and I had little side discussion on wrist guards over there. Bottom line is that wrist guards do help prevent injuries. Wrist injuries are the #1 injury for snowboarding (hmm - I'm missing an authorative statistical reference for this).

IMHO - the safest way to fall is uphill unless your board is running straight downhill, then the safest is drop sideways face first. I recommend getting in the habit of making a fist, crossing your arms and making an ooomph sound on contact.
post #5 of 6
I managed a minor sprain of my left wrist two weeks ago, even though I was wearing my wrist guards. Thing was, I didn't feel the sting until late in the afternoon on the drive home. Two weeks plus and it's slightly tender but in good shape.

I know one of the arguments is that wrist guards reinforce bad habits, and another is that they transmit the impact force further up the arm, doing damage in another location.

From my newbie perspective, I don't want to think how my wrist might feel today had I not been wearing my guard two weeks ago. I'm getting better at falling the "right ways" (and getting even better at not falling at all), but at least in these early stages, it seems the guards have some value.
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonpole
So.. Wristguards... should I be using them?... If not, what's the safest way to fall?.. I know in skiing I usually prefer to fall on my side if I need to fall.. (because falling forward sounds crazy and backwards would mean I'd never get back up...) What about snowboarding?
wristguards like a helmet are personal a personal choice. i ride with a wrist guard on my left wrist because i broke it early season, so its my protection device for the season. i'm a regular rider btw.

for the pipe and park, i now wear a helmet and started rocking wristguards on both wrists this year.
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