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Solutions for pressure on instep?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I've just recently moved into Dolomite Pro Z boots, which are now fitting great after initially being very snug. My right foot, which is apparently a little larger than my left, is being pressured at one specific spot on the prominent bone at the top of my instep. My instep is pretty high.

I really only notice the pressure when I'm standing or on the lift. Any opinions on solutions for this pressure on the instep of one foot? I'm using very thin socks, and have virtually no tension on the lower boot buckles. The left boot is perfect.

Thanks!
post #2 of 28
curtis, are you using custom footbeds? would it be possible to keep your two lower shell buckles a bit looser? or maybe only the instep buckle?

how is the pressure translated? do you feel the boot pushing down from directly above?
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Uncle Crud,

I'm using Superfeet footbeds that were fitted by the pedorthist.

I have almost no tension on the lower two buckles ... just enough to keep them from flopping around.

The pressure is from above, directly on the bone on my instep. It feels like the reinforced edge of the tongue is pressing on one, specific small spot on the bone.

I also compared the two liners, to see if the right one was different, or had a bump or deformity, and I think it's fine. My hypothesis is that my right foot is just a few milimeters higher than my left, which results in the pressure since the boots fit so closely.

Thanks,

Curtis
post #4 of 28
a few ideas, some of which might be feasible, others might not. depends on that complex relation of your foot/ankle to your boot shell, your footbed and your liner boot.

-if the boot has a removable boot board/zeppa, this can be ground to give more vertical (top-to-bottom) volume within the boot. the bootfitter would be the person to check here.

-may be able to thin the footbed in the relevant area, giving more vertical volume within the boot. the pedorthist would be the person to check here.

-if footbed can't be thinned, may be able to expand the boot's shell to give more volume, although the top-to-bottom expansions are a lot more tricky than the side-to-side ones. this would be your bootfitter's arena.

-also might be able to remove some material (padding) from the liner boot/tongue in the area that's affected. again, this would be the bootfitter's arena.

another thing to consider is this: there's a debate as to whether a footbed should allow some foot flexibility in the arch/forefoot. for some people it seems that an extrafirm, super-stable footbed causes problems. while seeing a pedorthist should be a way of avoiding the potential problem of an uncomfortable or "improper" footbed molding, it might be worth considering checking with the pedorthist again to see if something has happened to the footbed, or to you, that would warrant a new molding.
post #5 of 28
Cut a hole in the hard outer surface of the tongue, right over the bone. Works every time. Don't mess with the footbeds and other stuff if you don't have to.

BK
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks, guys, for the input.

The boot does have a removable zeppa, but it's covered with cork (which I thought was strange) so I'm not sure how "grindable" it is. My first thought was to lower my foot in the boot a few millimeters, but the footbed is already pretty thin in most places (the pedorthist used the "thin" blue model Superfoot to reduce volume).

I've also exchanged e-mails with the pedorthist, who also suggested the "remove material from the liner" option, just over the pressured spot. But I was concerned that doing so would compromise the liner, making it likely to tear or fray where the material was removed.

Should I be concerned about the integrity of the liner if a small amount of the hard material is removed?
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis
Should I be concerned about the integrity of the liner if a small amount of the hard material is removed?
When I had this done in my F9000s the biggest issue was that the tongue of the liner was no longer self-centering beyond the problem fit area towards the toes. This meant very, very careful positioning of the liner tongue as the donning ordeal was likely to push it off center, bunch it or otherwise cause a temporary crease.

FWIW, the fitter at the shop I spoke to refused to grind the Pro Z footboard.

If you Thermoflex or Zipfit line this boot, I'd be glad to hear about it.
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
When I had this done in my F9000s the biggest issue was that the tongue of the liner was no longer self-centering beyond the problem fit area towards the toes. This meant very, very careful positioning of the liner tongue as the donning ordeal was likely to push it off center, bunch it or otherwise cause a temporary crease.
How much area did you have removed? I'm thinking that in my case an area the size of a dime should be sufficient.
post #9 of 28
4-5cm^2, starting directly undeneath the 2nd buckle to about midway between the two.
post #10 of 28
thin the bottom of the boot board..

really any of the solutions will work, just depends what you and the fitter like the best, but any will lower your foot, or raise the top of the boot
post #11 of 28
Anything you do to create more volume for your foot will change the whole fit of the boot. Cutting the hard part of the tongue won't change anything but the pressure point you are concerned about.
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone, for your assistance.

I'm going to go back to the podorthist so he can see my situation first hand. I'll likely end up having him remove some material from the liner over the hot spot.
post #13 of 28
When I remove instep material from the tongue, I will cut the seams on both sides of the problem area, recontour the foam, and then resew to seal the liner tongue. This type of repair will in no way weaken the tongue. I would try not to lower the zeppa as this could change the entire fit of the boot.
post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 
Cantman,

In an e-mail, the pedorthist suggested the following:

"If there is a shop where you are you can ask them to maybe grind the outer plastic on the tongue over your hot spot. Sometimes thinning the plastic, almost removing it will make it softer and reduce the pressure on your high instep."

Do you see any issue with this approach? I don't think I need a large adjustment.

Thanks,

Curtis
post #15 of 28
I've had the most success with the method I outlined. If you're going to let someone cut the plastic at the tongue, just make sure thet seal it up good.
(this will weaken the tongue somewhat at that area) Be sure when putting on and taking off the boot, you don't pull too hard on the tongue. (I've seen tongue's ripped in half at the point of repair)
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I'll also discuss your recommendation with the pedorthist.
post #17 of 28

Preassure on instep

Does your boot have a adjustment for the arch of your foot?

I had the same problem you described and fixed ti by lowering the arch.

Just a thought before you go altering the boot.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
I don't think so. I've never heard of an arch adjustment in the boot. Can you describe it?
post #19 of 28

It never hurts to check the obvious first, but

It's really a Tecnica thing. A section of the footboard plastic is slightly more flexible than the rest. That section has a ramp profile on the underside, the ramp designed to face a wedge nut underneath it.

Turning an externally accessible bolt drives the wedge nut inwards, pushing the ramp up and adjusting the fit in the arch area. The bolt head is generally visible on the outside of the boot, in the arch area on the medial side.

Unless the whole assembly's been ripped out as redundant to the footbed and the boot plugged with silicone.
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the description. No such mechanism is present on the Dolomite Pro Z.
post #21 of 28
this would also be my suggestion and I think better than putting a hole right through. Thinning the material will offer some volume and allow the padding to push up in more as well relieving pressure on a localized spot.

An even simpler approach might be to simply undo the buckle at that spot everytime you hit the lift line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis
Cantman,

In an e-mail, the pedorthist suggested the following:

"If there is a shop where you are you can ask them to maybe grind the outer plastic on the tongue over your hot spot. Sometimes thinning the plastic, almost removing it will make it softer and reduce the pressure on your high instep."

post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks, L7. After all of the input, thinning out the hard liner material also seems to me to be the most direct, lowest-risk approach. More material can be removed later, if necessary. And I'm not too keen on fooling around with the footboard and potentially altering the fit more than I intend. I'm looking for a "tweak", not a major change.

Regarding the lower two buckles, the boots fit so snugly that I already ski with virtually no tension on them.
post #23 of 28

Same problem

Hi,

I have the exact same problem but with a slight difference. The pain on my instep is on my smaller foot. It is right on the top of the instep and sometimes it radiates to my toes.

Like you, my top buckles are barely on but they do have some slight tension. Since I have to use the BootGlove to prevent snow seepage, I might try skiing with the buckle undone and see if it makes a difference. My boots are last years Lange 120 Freeride

I am very interested in finding out how you resolve this problem and I will keep an eye out for this thread. Good luck and I can definetily 'feel your pain'
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
OK. I'm going next week to try to get it resolved. I'll post an update.
post #25 of 28
Since the pain goes away when you ski, it sounds like your foot is sliding forward when you stand / relax. When the instep pain exists, are your toes against the shell?

I have a similar problem with my Diablos. The buckle over my instep is tensioned just enough to keep it from rattling when closed. I needed another 1/16" to get the buckle off the bone on the top of my foot.

Leaning through a doorway, using the door jambs as support, helped position my foot so that the instep buckle isn't directly over the bone. Now the position of lower buckles pull my foot into heel pocket and relieve pressure of the toebox against my toes.

Sorry to diverge... Can someone explain whether this is the proper feeling I should have from the lower buckles? As opposed to just holding the foot down in the boot? I've tried tightening the lower cuff buckle, but my foot eventually goes numb, which I've attributed to lack of circulation.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinc
Since the pain goes away when you ski, it sounds like your foot is sliding forward when you stand / relax. When the instep pain exists, are your toes against the shell?

I have a similar problem with my Diablos. The buckle over my instep is tensioned just enough to keep it from rattling when closed. I needed another 1/16" to get the buckle off the bone on the top of my foot.

Leaning through a doorway, using the door jambs as support, helped position my foot so that the instep buckle isn't directly over the bone. Now the position of lower buckles pull my foot into heel pocket and relieve pressure of the toebox against my toes.
I think my foot is slightly more forward when standing, but I think the movement is very limited. I think my particular problem is due to a high instep with a prominent bone, and very close fitting boots. I think my problem is measured in millimeters. My foot is held pretty firmly in the heal pocket.

I'll try your suggestion, though, and let you know if it helps.
post #27 of 28
I have the same problem (even the right foot too), and I don't know how I missed this but my Rossignol Race 1's have an adjustable tongue position for High, Medium, and Low instep. There is a velcro seam at the base of the tongue...for High instep, the tongue is withdrawn by about 3/4" vs the setting for Low instep. Apparently the approach is to make room for the high instep by withdrawing the tongue since the tongue tapers from top towards its origin.

I haven't skiied my boots yet since adjusting the tongue but it already feels better on my foot. I don't know if this helps with your particular boots but adjusting the insertion point of the tongue seems to have more aesthetic appeal than chopping holes in it. DAW
post #28 of 28
Bode Klammer speaks the truth (posts 11 and 5). I've also had material cut out of the liner over bumpy bone bits in the past.
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