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Tyrolia Free Flex mount - Page 2

post #31 of 41

I'm not toooooo dumb, though I few falls in the trees may have made their mark th_dunno-1[1].gif

Anyways-- I've skied anywhere from 2cm infront to 3cm behind midsole on a normal ski, but what goldsbar has are not "normal" skis.  They are Fischer SC race skis with a race binding.  Now if he wasn't going to race being a tiny bit behind or infront wouldn't be a big deal.  If he is going to race then they should be right on the line.  With race skis you really have much less give around mounting position than normal skis

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

I've never seen anyone race on anything more than 5ish mm's behind midpoint, let alone in front of it.  The ski is designed to flex at a certain point, and even the slightest adjustment on that can really mess the ski up. 


Sorry, but this nonsense.  Please spend some time educating yourself here on Epic regarding binding mount position.

post #32 of 41

I'm not a racer but I have read several times that the mount points for most WC skiers is closer to BoF on CRS than the factory indicated mark. Those skis are not really race skis anyway, WC SC is recreational race, WC SL is race department.

post #33 of 41

Quote:

Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

I'm not toooooo dumb, though I few falls in the trees may have made their mark th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif

Anyways-- I've skied anywhere from 2cm infront to 3cm behind midsole on a normal ski, but what goldsbar has are not "normal" skis.  They are Fischer SC race skis with a race binding.  Now if he wasn't going to race being a tiny bit behind or infront wouldn't be a big deal.  If he is going to race then they should be right on the line.  With race skis you really have much less give around mounting position than normal skis

 


 

RD…I know you're not dumb…funny yes…dumb no.  But what Noodler originally stated for you still stands with respect to mount points be it for racing or rec skis.  Following the manufactures line can be a start point for most but dogmatically following that point often limits an individual’s performance unless by sheer luck you best fit that line.  Otherwise, lines on skis or race plates affixed with bsl mounting points are only average approximations/best performance guesses made by the manufacture for the multitude of folks who’ll be skiing their skis (and the way they envision you skiing their ski).  So if making a general statement I’d rather adjust your comment to read; “With race skis you’ll have finer adjustments fore/aft of your normal mount point”.

 

FWIW, I’ve found the “tab” method adjustment is no more inferior or superior than others insofar as accuracy with boot interface and FP.  However with a brand new binding those tabs can be a bit of a bother breaking free (opening up) the first time for most folks new to that type of adjustment method. Additionally, when in combination with race plates and positioning your boot into mounting points differing from suggested boot bsl number; fine adjustment with a tab can be a bit more cumbersome. 

 

post #34 of 41

It may be that I'm just ham-fisted but it seemed like the internal holes in the tab adjustment were not 1 mm but maybe 2 mm, so it appeared to me to be less fine than the Atomic Neox screw adjustment, for example.

post #35 of 41

I recently adjusted forward pressure on my FR12s (Fisher's Tyrolia).  The tab method is not as fine as the screw method, but it still gets you in an acceptable range.  Of the two possible positions, one was very near one end, but still within the range and the other was near the other end but closer to the middle. 

post #36 of 41

Yes, exactly, I had the same experience. The only thing I didn't like was the amount of force it took to click in in the more "middle" position vs other bindings I have played with.

post #37 of 41

You are adjusting the forward pressure without a boot in the binding, and then checking it with the boot in the binding?  It shouldn't take any more force to set it to one position or the other when there is no boot locked in.

post #38 of 41

Yes, I don't mean it takes more force to set the forward pressure of the binding, but that it takes more force to just insert the boot.

post #39 of 41

Probably a little late to help this guy but the bit size is 4.1mm NOT 4.7!!!

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speeder View Post

Probably a little late to help this guy but the bit size is 4.1mm NOT 4.7!!!



DOH!  I NEVER trust a bit size given without also holding it beside the screws to be sure.

 

If not, there's always this recovery option..

 

Heli-Coil.gif

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



DOH!  I NEVER trust a bit size given without also holding it beside the screws to be sure.


 


Ski drill bits come in a variety of sizes, from 3.4 to 4.7 and various lengths.

i.e.  http://www.artechski.com/binding-drill-bits-8204.aspx

 

however the general 'convention' is 3.6 x 9 for a ski without a metal topsheet or internal sheet/ binding plate (fiberglass and similar).  4.1 x 9 for anything which has a metal sheet/plate through which the screw must go. Then it's recommended to thread 'tap' the metal, since binding screws are general not self-tapping (nor is that a good idea).

 

x7 length is used for locating bindings on very thin skis, or for boots which are so large (29+) that the heel (and possibly the toe)  is located far enough rearward (or forward) to be over a potentially thin area.

however a short screw must also be used when in that area...

if not sure, you can put the screw into the bindings plate and hold at the sidewall of the ski and see how far the screw will penetrate. If the screw is near, or at the ski edge, you're well down, and maybe through, the main ski carcass, go shorter...

 

glue - optional - used mainly for some lube to make driving the screw easier. Unconfirmed that it also adds a little moisture barrier at the screw/hole interface.

in the old daze, some nosepickers used to use epoxy - what a pain in da nutz!

if you NEED to use glue for peace of mind, use white/elmers and be happy.

 

I didn't like the binding placement locations on my Tyrolia Free Flex plates on the skis they came on, since I'm a "BOF on CRS" guy (I still ski full camber slats); so I just drilled another set of holes and used the original hole spacing to make a template....

 

the sun rose again the next morning... phee UUU... 

 

 

 

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