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Motion Sickness and Skiing

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I was curious to see if anyone else suffers from this and how you are dealing with it. Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 21
I've gotten it in the past. Not so much lately. I notice that it's worse when I'm on old lifts that vibrate a lot. Newer detachable chairs seem to not cause any problems.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
The lift rides are not an issue for me, it's the skiing.
post #4 of 21
Glad to hear someone else can get a little queezy on the slopes. The only time I've gotten it is when it's like my first day out and it's snowing good. It went away when I focused further away so the snowflakes weren't so in focus and I had a greater view of the trail. Make any sense? : It's difficult being a delicate, I know. So don't look at your skis, but find a fixed place in the distance to ski towards, a tree, pole, without hitting it and ski in that direction. Kinda of like what they teach in ski schools. Good luck
post #5 of 21

Medical Issue?

As one who occassionally suffers from motion sickness, in my case usually seasickness, I have never had a hint of similar issues while skiing. I am no doctor, and am likely to be way off base, but it occurs to me that there might be a specific medical issue here rather than just regular motion sickness. It might be worth finding a doctor who deals with issues of balance and vertigo, and find out if there is something going on which might respond to treatment.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skibiscuit
.... It's difficult being a delicate, I know. So don't look at your skis...
: Yes, don't! :
You'll end up with more to worry about than motion sickness if you ski while looking at your skis.
post #7 of 21
We get a lot of fog here in the PNW, and I get motion sickness when skiing in a bowl, socked in the fog.

Once everything goes white, and I can't get a point of reference its very disorienting to ski.

I usually stop and get my bearings, then proceed slowly until I can get near some trees, or something to use as a point of reference.
post #8 of 21
The most effective remedy out there (without side effects), by far, is ginger pills

Goto GNC, and get you some ginger pills

I'm not sure what dosage, but ginger is fairly safe--so knock yourself out.

Alternatively, there are prescription medications that are probably more effective but they have side effects.

Alternatively, you could chew on some ginger or prepare a ginger tea, but i think the pills are most convenient.
post #9 of 21
Did you watch mythbusters episode on this?
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
I've been using Dramamine. It works. While skiing, I don't really feel any side effects. However, driving under its influence is impossible.

I recently purchased a bracelet that sends a small electrical current into a nerve on the underside of the wrist. It works as well. The only problem there is the band needs to be placed just right. If it moves during a run, I am screwed. It only takes one unmedicated run and I'm in the trees gaging and the effects linger for quite a while.

I've never had any real problems with motion. However, reading in the car is a big no no. I think the G's created by carving combined with my tendency to focus on the terrain in front of me causes the sickness.

Ginger, interesting.

What did they conclude on Mythbusters?
post #11 of 21
What ever works for you guys is all well and good - but mythbusters found that the electric deals didn't work, and the ginger was poor at best in relieving the symptoms. It was an intersting episode seeing adam and grant hurling hard after a few seconds in the hurl-o-chair.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KennyG
What ever works for you guys is all well and good - but mythbusters found that the electric deals didn't work, and the ginger was poor at best in relieving the symptoms. It was an intersting episode seeing adam and grant hurling hard after a few seconds in the hurl-o-chair.
Gee a hurl-o-chair doesn't sound like skiing or much fun. Maybe it's a gondola gone berserk spinning real fast in a sudden gust of 80 mile winds.

There are some people who love to believe in white lab coats, the TV, and paying for worthless prescriptions. There are some people who do their own research and discover remedies like Ginger and some little energy device to feel better. Maybe none of these remedies work and both the classic rip-off medical prescriptions and the so-called alternative medicines are really just placebos. It's all between the ears anyway, don't you know. I prefer the less costly, little (ginger breath) or no side-effect than the high-cost-waste of time prescripts.

I can get violently sick sometimes when I get motion sickness. Like a wild Manhattan cab ride will do it. Less than zero fun. It's the eyes not cooperating with the inner ear. All senses go haywire. It's horrible. I just want to die, for real, but I don't. So, I just make sure in confined situations that I can look out towards the horizon somewhere and get some fresh air. No time for ginger or energy bracelets.

The same applies to skiing.
Fresh air - check.
Look out towards the horizon - check.
Ski to a point of reference, tree, pole - check
And relax and ski with active legs and quiet top - check

Tips up
post #13 of 21

Dizzy lizzy

I have suffered from menier's type symptoms for the last 15 years and have been almost totally incapacitated on the slopes. It's just in the last 5 years or so that doctors are getting up on this little known disease. I won't bore you with details but if your interested read about it here:
http://www.menieresinfo.com/

There are a myriad of reasons people get motion sickness and just as many remedies. The best thing you can do is research your ass off, try different remedies until you find what works for you. As stated before the problem is the relationship with the brain, inner ears and eye's. I really don't get dizzy but suffer from extreme nausea and loss of energy. I get symptoms from daily activity and sometimes at night while asleep.

Here is what has made my life easier.

Stay away from salt.
Make sure you are properly hydrated before you ski.
Don't drink Alcohol the day before you ski.
Try to stay away from swinging lifts. I will actually drag my skiis in a plow to minimize the swing of the chair after the operator lets go.
Altitude hurts me. Skiing at higher resorts in flat light is asking for trouble.
Stay in or near the tree's in flat light.
acupuncture has worked for me as well and I have had success with wrist bands with little nubs on them that apply pressure on the inside of your wrist.
diuretics can also help. I am off them now and I credited that from the reduction in salt intake.

I never take drugs as the side effects are as bad as the problem. If I had to do one I would probably do antivert.

Valium works great. I got a script from my doc. But I only take it at home, never out. I pop one then lie down and nap and things get better. I don't do this as a prevent.

You really have to throw the kitchen sink at it to find your own solution.

If anyone wants more info they can PM me, I am a bonified veteran at dealing with this one.
post #14 of 21
Just vomit. It's not like you'll ruin the rug.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KennyG
Did you watch mythbusters episode on this?

Yes YEs!!!!

On mythbusters, they built this spinning chair to make ppl dizzy. Then they tried various remedies--everything from tongue sprays to electronic wrist zappers. The only one that worked was ginger pills--and no drowsy side effects!! They've also done actual scientific studies and found that ginger pills work.

Get some ginger in your body. Now!!!! Then go ski.
post #16 of 21

I get nausea when skiing quite often. For me it seems to happen only in the morning.  I can't explain that.  I did have it once when night skiing and that would make some sense if it is visibility related.  I've tried the motion sickness patches that go behind your ear but with limited success.  I've had a sensitivity to motion since I was a child but it only after 40 did it experience it on skis.  It really sucks and has spoiled a lot of good ski days.  I'm going to try the ginger pills next. . .

post #17 of 21
OP, are you a head tipper when you ski?
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

OP, are you a head tipper when you ski?

Do you really mean the Original Poster? (Check thread date...). Or do you mean dwsmith?
post #19 of 21
Oops.
post #20 of 21

I have never had issues with motion sickness before but a few weeks ago I went to Squaw and at the top of KT 22 skiing across the ridge I was getting really bad vertigo.  When I was standing on these very steep runs I was getting vertigo and weak in the knees and heart racing.  I had to back away from the edge and look down at my skis or even close my eyes and regain my composure and start my run.  That's not really the same as motion sickness though.  I spoke to my friend about it who I ski with a lot and he's a physician.  His advice echoed a lot of the more gentler stuff jbuhl stated (reduce salt, alcohol, hydrate, etc.)  As you get older your inner ear also can lose the quickness to cope with motion or even heights as well.  

 

I like that ginger idea.  I'll take that with me on my next trip.  

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwsmith View Post

I get nausea when skiing quite often. For me it seems to happen only in the morning.  I can't explain that.  I did have it once when night skiing and that would make some sense if it is visibility related.  I've tried the motion sickness patches that go behind your ear but with limited success.  I've had a sensitivity to motion since I was a child but it only after 40 did it experience it on skis.  It really sucks and has spoiled a lot of good ski days.  I'm going to try the ginger pills next. . .

This has been such a problem for me on multiple occasions over the years that I now just take meclizine every time I ski, a couple hours before I'm going to hit snow. Not crazy about it but not worth losing ski days by farting around.
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