EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Bases, Sherlock, do they tell me anything?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bases, Sherlock, do they tell me anything?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I don't normally post here because I sometimes can't decipher the answers to my questions, but I just came upon some interesting things today.

I have new skis. We skied at Smugglers Notch yesterday in the rain (thanks, OBOE, for a wonderful little 'tour', and on one run we saw a little vole (not a squirrel, but does that count? )crossing the trail and helped him out of the way of razor sharp skis to safety). Hero snow, we all skied well... even sopping wet.:

The bases looked ok at the end of that day.

Today at Killington, it was the opposite: a damn blizzard, super windy, and ICY. Death cookies, rocks, boilerplate, frostbite from the windchill cuz it was COLD!, the whole damn mess. They were blowing snow on top of the natural falling and it was near whiteout at times. Thank heaven there were only 100 people there (not kiddin......EMPTY).

My teeth hurt from the sound of turning on MINUS 100 GRIT SANDPAPER...it was the kind of rock hard stuff that I hate.

At home, looking at my bases, I saw that the wax was gone from the inside of both skis from the tip of front binding to about 6 inches behind the last binding.

In trying to do some sleuthing, I came to the conclusion that I was really working my skis on the ice too hard and sitting back a little. I know I'm a one footed skier, and in a left turn my left foot isn't really on the snow (ice), otherwise I'd have some wax rubbed off on the outside edges.

Another thing I noticed was long scratches that went from midway between the front binding and tip....all the way to the tail of the ski. I brilliantly deduced that I wasn't using my tips enough because the scratches would've started more toward the tip of the ski.

Am I off mark, or would these be some pretty good assessments? Since the skis are new, can I look at the 'damage' and know what's happening, or is this just stupid?
post #2 of 19
no, it's a very, very intelligent exercise, much like checking your tire wear to assess alignment issues, and checking the soles of your running shoes to see where your strike is centered.
one thing i would caution, however- we all tend to have more pressure iover the binding area , over the course of a day, than we do on either the tip or tail, so under-the-bindings will show far more wear on the bases of the best of us...
further- we all use a little more of the area behind the binding when we skate, than that area ahead of the binding.
that's typically why you'll see more wear aft o' the ole traps.
i have always examined my bases for technical cues, though. good instincts!!!
post #3 of 19
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
At home, looking at my bases, I saw that the wax was gone from the inside of both skis from the tip of front binding to about 6 inches behind the last binding. In trying to do some sleuthing, I came to the conclusion that I was really working my skis on the ice too hard and sitting back a little.
No wear on the tails=Weighting the front of the skis too much vs sitting back.

Quote:
I know I'm a one footed skier, and in a left turn my left foot isn't really on the snow (ice), otherwise I'd have some wax rubbed off on the outside edges.
One footed wear would be the left edge of the right ski and the right edge of the left ski.
post #5 of 19
I'd say your sluthing is pretty much on, Bonni, unless you spent the day doing Vlad's skating exercises.

Hard snow is definitely more wearing on skis than soft. Man-made hard is even tougher on bases than natural thaw/freeze. Has to do with the nature of the crystals formed in snowmaking.
post #6 of 19
All the more reason to keep your skis waxed. If you hit the underfoot portion of the bindings with a truebar at the end of the year ... you may see enough wear to warrrant a base grind. Keep em' waxed may save on a grind.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Comprex, there are two possible reasons you posted that link:

1) to prove that I am right not to post this stuff because all I will get is indecipherable answers:

2) Since I don't read every thread on this forum, I should use the search function, then try to read something that makes no sense to me, hence the answer to my question: Yes, it's stupid to try to assess your bases.
post #8 of 19
bases and where and how the wax wears tells a great story!

bonni ... one trick I was taught (when it comes to wax) is to wax the ski with the temp appropriate wax and then to use a small amount of a colder wax to seal the wax and create a surface that wears longer. super cold snow/ice is very abrasive to start with.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
I'd say your sluthing is pretty much on, Bonni, unless you spent the day doing Vlad's skating exercises.

Hard snow is definitely more wearing on skis than soft. Man-made hard is even tougher on bases than natural thaw/freeze. Has to do with the nature of the crystals formed in snowmaking.
now, kneale, most skiers skate more than they realize in locomoting the flats, and skating puts immense force on the underbinding area.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Comprex, there are two possible reasons you posted that link:

1) to prove that I am right not to post this stuff because all I will get is indecipherable answers:

(vlad note: ya took the words right outta my mouth..the media, indeed, is the message in comprex' cited posts)

2) Since I don't read every thread on this forum, I should use the search function, then try to read something that makes no sense to me, hence the answer to my question: Yes, it's stupid to try to assess your bases.
(no need to use the search function prior to that question, especially considering the fact that the cited post of comprex' was a glowing example of the indecipherable technopedantry you mentioned- this threas is most relevant and you are correc t that much can be learne dform base examination)
post #11 of 19
[quote=therusty]No wear on the tails=Weighting the front of the skis too much vs sitting back. [quote]

bonni also claimed no wear on the front of the ski, and the pressure that we exert on our shovels and heels is far less than underfoot pressure, so after a mere day of skiing we see far less wear on our shovels and heels
post #12 of 19
Uh, Bonni + vlad, before these things get taken personally, I should point out some of several other reasons I've posted that link:

- I am uncertain what evidence of downstem at turn finish would look like

- I am uncertain what evidence of over-agressive snowgun snow on a barely waxed base would look like

- I am uncertain what evidence of a badly-loaded ski (whether through design or internal damage (sure it LOOKED OK after dcdre pranged it on the logs at Kicking Horse) would look like

- I am uncertain of what evidence of an overloaded soft ski with a stiff underbinding plate (quite possibly the case there) would look like

- I am uncertain of what evidence of pushing away to find edge for any engagement would look like.

So, I thought to point out a similar pattern of wear and request comments without steering them to an answer I wanted. Apparently that wasn't clear enough?
post #13 of 19
Bonni,

Don't worry too much about the wax wearing under your foot more than the rest of the ski. That's normal, because that's where most of the pressure is. You probably will also wear out the wax close to the edges sooner than down the center of the skis.

The scratches theat run from the middle to tail of the ski are actually a good sign. There is no way to tell that it's not just from one rock or from many, but the positive side of this is that the scratchs ran down the length of the ski, not across it. This means you are moving forward (carving) and not sliding the skis around sideways.

If the wax had been applied evenly along the entire ski, see if there is a lot less wax on the back third of the ski than the front third. If that's the case, and you know the wax was evenly applied, then that might be an indication of pressuring the tails consistantly. But you are better off just getting some video.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
...on one run we saw a little vole ...crossing the trail...
Was she skiing on Vole-ants?

IIRC voles build huge networks of snow tunnels to find winter food, but I've never actually seen one skiing, or seen one, skiing.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
No wear on the tails=Weighting the front of the skis too much vs sitting back.
bonni also claimed no wear on the front of the ski, and the pressure that we exert on our shovels and heels is far less than underfoot pressure, so after a mere day of skiing we see far less wear on our shovels and heels
Oops - my bad - I read "tip of front" and missed the "binding" wrapped on the next line.

good catch
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Pm'd ya, Comprex. It's not personal.

Without a way to take good video, I guess it's a guessing game unless I find someone I trust, who is knowledgable, to point things out to me that I'm doing wrong. I have no idea what I look like when I ski. I know the picture in my head isn't accurate because I am not built like Charlotte Moats. But that's what I FEEL like.

I think ESA next year is in order. Yes, indeedy.
post #17 of 19
Bonni,

I
Quote:
have no idea what I look like when I ski
What do your quads tell you? Can you feel what part of the ski in interacting most in the snow? If you lift up the inside ski during a turn and balance on the outside ski, does the tip point toward the snow, the tail point toward the snow, or is the ski evenly off the snow???

These are some self assessing tasks that you can do.

RW
post #18 of 19
Sounds like you could be a little more forward.

The wax situation is completely normal.

Switch your skis daily or at noon, and otherwise just keep them tuned.
post #19 of 19

Base inspection

You saw that wax was gone in these areas? Maybe it was wear instead of wax you saw?

When I wax (at least every third time up) you can't see any wax when I'm done. The wax has to be out of the structure of the ski base. After ironing in the wax I'll make3 passes on each ski. That's one set. I do 3 to 5 sets. After scraping I use a bronze brush (spendy little sucker!) with overlapping strokes tip to tail (about 10 to 12) and do this twice. Then repeat this process with a nylon brush.

Then I finish with a general nylon Rotobrush, back and forth, light to medium pressure at half drill speed, then two light passes at full drill speed. Then repeat this process with a soft nylon rotobrush. Results are incredible.

Might want to add a few drips of colder wax along the edges, each side in the binding area. This helps protect the base in that area. Someone here suggested that quite awhile ago. I forget who, but kudos to him for that idea.

And kudos to you for keeping an eye on your bases! Bob
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Bases, Sherlock, do they tell me anything?