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Lesson ??

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm a midwest skier with 20 years experience coming back after ten years off (kids, career...). I can ski all the blacks in the midwest ( I know, I know...) comfortably. I'm going to Steamboat next month for a few days and haven't skied powder in too many years. Do I need a lesson ? If so, can anybody recommend one at the resort ?
post #2 of 18
Can't recommend anyone particular in Steamboat, but I would say yes to the lesson, maybe in the afternoon on the first day, after you've gotten your ski legs under you. No better way to learn a few things about the mountain and about your skiing. And powder? Holy Moly we have heaps of it this year. Based on the pictures I was seeing from Vail this morning, I may need a lesson too. I can ski powder. . . but I am not sure about the kind that requires a SNORKEL!

Have a great trip!
Mollmeister
post #3 of 18

Great idea

I'd definitely spring for a lesson - and doubly so if you have some new skis or will be renting. The shape of skis has evolved quite a bit over the last 10 years, and the technique has as well. A lesson or two early in your trip will help you get the most out of the skis and the mountain. Have fun.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
I've got my own gear. Been skiing for the last year and I'm using the Legend 8000's (fantastic...) right now and may have a chance to snap up a pair of 8800's before I hit the "boat"
post #5 of 18
there is not much of anything steep at steamboat, you should be fine!

I would say, no lesson for the first day. If you have 20 years under you belt and were any kind of accomplished, go out and pick a blue un-groomed run and practice. If you can't get it going, get a lesson. My guess is you will do fine and have a great time. Lessons can often be standing around and not skiing and the majority of instructors are weak at teaching not to even mention thier own skiing abilities. Have a great time.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd braun
...

Lessons can often be standing around and not skiing and the majority of instructors are weak at teaching not to even mention thier own skiing abilities.

...
IMHO, that's way too broad a generalization, lloyd. My experience and observations would be much different.

gregmerz... I would concur with the idea of a half-day lesson after you've skied for a little bit. I would be willing to bet that you would come away from a half-day lesson with some good things to work on for your skiing and a better feel for the mountain as well.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
IMHO, that's way too broad a generalization, lloyd. My experience and observations would be much different.
I am not saying your wrong, but how many instructors in Jackson(cause you live there) would you personally recommend? compare that to the # of available instructors.

Most are not worthy. Sorry but true
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd braun
I am not saying your wrong, but how many instructors in Jackson(cause you live there) would you personally recommend? compare that to the # of available instructors.

Most are not worthy. Sorry but true
I'm not sure what your trying to say with recomened/available comparison. Lesson assignments are not random chance. A skier with 20 years experience wanting a powder primer is not going to get the new guy from Nebraska on a working vacation.

As for a recomendation CJ Hoigard(sp?) or Dave Moon.
post #9 of 18
i gotta say, i am very much in agreemnet with Lloyd Braun on this one.
I've felt, more often than not, pity for the poor sould who put their faith, trust and money into some jerkoff pinhead who stands around yapping at them when the poor soul could be out ripping it up.
I hope my book will help cats like that in amping up their own self-discovery.
"serenity now" , Lloyd....
post #10 of 18
If you get a good recommendation here, don't hesitate to get instruction on day 1. It will make the rest of the days that much better.

Since you have had such a long lay-off, you'll be getting into and onto equipment that is much different. As a result, they will do things that the old skis (especially) could not do. Furthermore, the feelings that you will get from them are likely to be misleading based on your experience.

Therefore, I would highly recommend a solid lesson from a recommended instructor (PSIA Level III at a minimum, Trainer or Examiner if possible).
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
i gotta say, i am very much in agreemnet with Lloyd Braun on this one.
I've felt, more often than not, pity for the poor sould who put their faith, trust and money into some jerkoff pinhead who stands around yapping at them when the poor soul could be out ripping it up.
I hope my book will help cats like that in amping up their own self-discovery.
"serenity now" , Lloyd....
But what you and lloyd both seem to be missing is that gregmerz specifically came on here ASKING for a recommendation. Armed with that info, he could be an informed consumer and get what he wants. He also appears to be smart enough to ask a question or two at the area before committing to paying for a lesson.

If he follows the advice of you and lloyd, he WON'T take a lesson and he has NO chance of getting a really good, helpful instructor.

To answer the question about JH, I would honestly say that there are at least 40 instructors here that I would feel very comfortable recommending or even taking a lesson from myself. That's out of 179 adult Alpine instructors, of whom about 75 are primarily adult private instructors. That's pretty good odds if you ask me.
post #12 of 18
hey guys,

I took a lesson a day ago because we had tons of fresh snow and powder is something that I need some help with. Turned out to be two of us in the group. We skied bowls and I even had to negotiate a cornice and some tight glades. I was happy for the chairlift rides and lunch as it gave me a chance to catch my breath -- there was all skiing and no talking going on.

When it comes to lessons I think you have to be assertive in telling the supervisor (person wearing the radio at the meeting place for lessons) and your instructor precisely what your goals are.

Furthermore, some of you may have an experience where you don't immediately go ski the stuff you want ... the instructor has you work on some technique. Technique and tactics are why you take a lesson. If you don't want to learn that stuff, then you're right, just go free-skiing.

I vote "take a lesson"!

kiersten
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh


Therefore, I would highly recommend a solid lesson from a recommended instructor (PSIA Level III at a minimum, Trainer or Examiner if possible).
OUCH! are you kidding me? and you thought i was mistaken when i state dthat you aren't getting outside that box?
there are PHENOMENAL instructors out there, at many american resorts, lacking even a level I, whom might give a superior lesson. the higher up the pinhead ladder you go, the more talking, less moving you'll get.
what a way to spend the first day of one's vacation in the rockies...standing around getting a pedantic lecture.something's gotta give in the american ski school, and it's gotta give, fast:
post #14 of 18
Bob Peters said:
"... But what you and lloyd both seem to be missing is that gregmerz specifically came on here ASKING for a recommendation...
If he follows the advice of you and lloyd, he WON'T take a lesson and he has NO chance of getting a really good, helpful instructor."



ummm...Bob- what YOU 'seem to be missing' is the fact that greg asked this (exact quote from his thread-starting post):

"... Do I need a lesson ? ..." (actual quote-reread his first post, #1 on this thread)

clearly he asks IF he even NEEDS a lesson. My advice is, NO. enjoy the vacation.
I am shocked that somehow you took that question of his to mean he was insisting on taking a lesson, and he just wanted to know which instructor to take it with. that's NOT what he asked, at all.
............. scary.
with that type of thinking, you'll make examiner in NO time
(Vlad is ascaired)
post #15 of 18
vlad, he asked both: should he take a lesson and if so, who would we recommend.

I say, "Definitely YES." And without a specific recommendation (which he now has), I stand by my initial suggestion.

I know you have an axe to grind. But that doesn't make you right.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
OUCH! are you kidding me? and you thought i was mistaken when i state dthat you aren't getting outside that box?
there are PHENOMENAL instructors out there, at many american resorts, lacking even a level I, whom might give a superior lesson. the higher up the pinhead ladder you go, the more talking, less moving you'll get.
what a way to spend the first day of one's vacation in the rockies...standing around getting a pedantic lecture.something's gotta give in the american ski school, and it's gotta give, fast:
Decidedly not in my experience. And I've joined a number of such instructors in and around their lessons over the past three years. At a Summit County resort I could easily give any number of recommendations (some of whom are even posters here on EpicSki).
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
vlad, he asked both: should he take a lesson and if so, who would we recommend.

I say, "Definitely YES." And without a specific recommendation (which he now has), I stand by my initial suggestion.

I know you have an axe to grind. But that doesn't make you right.
ummmm...ssh: my point was that the previous poster claimed that all greg asked for was a recommendation, and that me and another poster were out-of-line for suggesting he forego the lesson. i pointe dout that in his inaccurate drison of our responses to greg's question, he was wrong. no axe to grind, except perhaps the hatchet of clarity.

just what a high-quality site needs: ....a stalking moderator with a flamethrower and a cert. pin....
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Decidedly not in my experience. And I've joined a number of such instructors in and around their lessons over the past three years. At a Summit County resort I could easily give any number of recommendations (some of whom are even posters here on EpicSki).
well....that's your experience. i've taught in schools in the east (including three in VT), the rockies (keystone/a-basin), and tahoe (squaw), and from my experience in american schools, that's what i've observed....over the past 29 years.
i could give good recommendations for many instructors and a handful of examiners. the majority, however, are colour-by-numbers elitists.....
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