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Age and healing

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
So it's been a full month since I was hit by a punk snowboarder. My lower leg has almost healed fully. However, I have degenerated into a terribly out-of-shape beer and wine guzzling 55 year old shut-in. There's still some swelling to the ankle and calf. With the latest rains I feel the pain in all the joints. I tried ice skating but it was too much for the ankles. All I can do is walk and I put in 7 miles yesterday. Now, I have to get back into shape before I try any skiing at all. Luckily we have no local snow as I'ld be out on cross-country equipment putting too much stress on the joints. I have also found out some frightening facts about snowboarding from the nearest dealer in boards. It seems that it takes much less time to be able to negotiate the whole mountain on a board than it does on skiis. However, it takes just as long to negotiate it in control. The boarding population isn't in control of their actions as much as the skiing population.
post #2 of 18
have you considered yoga?
post #3 of 18
Unforunate accident. Glad to see you making a recovery. I fell last summer and it took a few months to recover. 53 y.o. and not 10 feet tall and bullet proof anymore. Yes sometimes things happen but I don't know why people can't avoid others on the hill. Christ they come right at you. Dumbasses have no class. I prefer skiing in control, it's not nearly as fatigueing and more enjoyable. I was clipped twice from behind while skiing this week 1 boarder and 1 skier both seniors with helmets, on the bottom of green runs. Anymore when I stop I face uphill (with ski pole in hand) or find a stationary object. Hope you ski again soon.
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
So it's been a full month since I was hit by a punk snowboarder. My lower leg has almost healed fully. However, I have degenerated into a terribly out-of-shape beer and wine guzzling 55 year old shut-in. There's still some swelling to the ankle and calf. With the latest rains I feel the pain in all the joints. I tried ice skating but it was too much for the ankles. All I can do is walk and I put in 7 miles yesterday. Now, I have to get back into shape before I try any skiing at all.
My Dad, who is 63, took a freak fall in late November, when a skier fell in front of him. The fall looked like nothing more than some sort of gentle, Three Stooges pratfall (I was actually giggling when it happened, which went over really well, as you can imagine), but he ended up taking a Patrol sled down with a torn muscle at the top of his calf. He didn't get back out on skis until about 12 days ago.

He was definitely frustrated about how age impacted his healing and overall sense of well-being with an injury. About 15 years ago he broke his knee in a couple of places skiing the Back Bowls at Vail, and while he was obviously out of commission then, he somehow felt like this injury was in a sense just as bad. Lots of swelling, soreness, related joint pain, and difficulty getting *back on the horse,* so to speak.

He started going to a physical therapist a couple of times a week, which he found really helped, as well as adding a lot of stretching and walking to his workout, once he could hit the gym again. When he finally did get out on the hill, he took a half-day private lesson and worked with the instructor on warm-ups and stretches. Instructor was really helpful in keeping him on runs that wouldn't overly tax his legs on this first day out, and keeping an eye out for out-of-control snowboarders and skiers. Really helped on many levels. Now he can't wait to get back out on the mountain. . . once he is back in town from some crazy travel.

Hope you're able to get back out on the hill soon!
Mollmeister
post #5 of 18
Sorry to hear your healing process is taking it's time. When I get injured, twisted joints, bruised everything. I rub cold press castor oil into the swollen joints/areas. It brings the swelling down. I also take the homeopathic remedy Arnica. Arnica is especially good as soon as the accident happens. It's excellent for reducing swelling and bruising. Arnica comes in a small plastic bottle, fits nicely in my jacket and the Castor oil I keep in my boot bag when I limp back into the lodge. Good luck and fast on the healing.
post #6 of 18
Swimming, and rubbing on remedies (I think it's the massage) do help. Placebos work too, but only if you know they work .
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
I have also found out some frightening facts about snowboarding from the nearest dealer in boards. It seems that it takes much less time to be able to negotiate the whole mountain on a board than it does on skiis. However, it takes just as long to negotiate it in control. The boarding population isn't in control of their actions as much as the skiing population.
Exactly. Their notion of "control" isn't ours. When I hear one coming up, I whack them with my pole. It shocks them, but if I can hit them with my short pole, they are TOO CLOSE as their level of control is way less than the equivalent skiier's.

Their idea of being on snow is that it's OK to hit someone. It's part of the sport. But for skiiers, it's not. On both counts.
post #8 of 18
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
my short pole
Sorry to hear that
post #10 of 18
ant is a woman
post #11 of 18
Isn't getting older grand?
I had shoulder surgery in the begining of Nov.
Followed by 2 months of PT,which began 2 days post op.
It is now just getting to to the point where I'm comfortable.
Range of motion is there and has been for a while ,but still have some pain.
Doc. says shoulders can take up to a year to be 100%,OH JOY!
The thing is ,I had my right shoulder done 17 years ago. I don't remember it taking any time at all.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz
ant is a woman
oops
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

Skiing and a long life.

Thanks Mollmeister for this >>Hope you're able to get back out on the hill soon!<< Thanks also to the other wishes sent. Actually, I hope I'll be able to get out on cross country skiis soon if we see local snow. I'm more dedicated now to skiing the B.C. than ever as I would rather feel in control of my own destiny. I do believe that I can avoid these kinds of injuries that way. The best therapy has been a regular in take of California wine, too. I'm not in the best of shape as a result, but I'm certainly enjoying life!!!! I've also devised a way of putting more ankle support in my leather boots with belts and buckles. As much as I like lift-service skiing, I don't like the kind of public it seems to attract. The only time I'll go back to Killington will be when it is a great snow year. Then, I'll stick to the expert trails. The futher one gets from N.Y.C., the less risks of getting slammed.
post #14 of 18
i hate outta control boarders too, but if you can walk 7 miles (as you state in the opening post), then you can ski.
i can't do much of either, haven't been able for years, now.
step away from the keyboard and go ski.
post #15 of 18
"
Healing

nothing more than

healing...

i wish i never broke
my arm
this healing really blows...


HEALING
WHOOOOOA
WHOAAOOOOA
WHOOOOAAA
HEALING

I wish i never broke my arm
this healing really blows"
-Copyright 2006, Vlad Bacharach and columbia/reprise records group
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

I beg to differ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vlad
i hate outta control boarders too, but if you can walk 7 miles (as you state in the opening post), then you can ski.
i can't do much of either, haven't been able for years, now.
step away from the keyboard and go ski.
Actually, I knew that walking wasn't the best exercise I could do, but the alternatives were worse. Swimming, certainly, would have been the best. However, I neither have easy access to a pool nor an inclination to swim in them. Skiing, both X-C and DH, isn't as good for injuries to the lower calf or ankle than walking. My ankle will heal better without the skiing. Even in a tight fitting DH boot, the pressures on one's ankles and the resultant distortions aren't natural. Right now, I could ski DH without trouble, but my healing will go faster without it. In addition I could go ice skating today, but I decided not to go for the same reasons. It's doubtful that I won't ski again this year, but I might be better off not.
post #17 of 18
i hear that. hiking definitely works for most recoveries/weaknesses...
i think it was ghirardelli whose dad used hiking, pretty strictly just hiking mountains, for mark's recovery periods.
best with a speedy and strong recovery.
funny thing, in all my hypocrisy: i've been hiking the local resort mountain, even though i really can't ski or board, presently.
best exercise for me, and likely for you, being it's the ankle:
hike UP trails (preferably closed...speak to your local patrol)
and download the lift so you're only doing uphill hikes.
this is great for knees and ankles.
when you get back to the base, grab a water and hike right back up. really fun, and you find lotsa goggles
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

Ha, ha

Today was a total reversal in attitude. I taped my ankle and went ice skating. The taping helped noticably. Now, I hope to be skiing DH Wednesday, again with a taped ankle. How can you hike up ski trails when they have snow and skiers? As an update, I was back skiing at Cannon as I reported on the General thread. I also was out hiking the trails and in the woods in Franconia Notch. I'm planing on X-C skiing tomorrow with a taped ankle. Everything is going well. I decided to cease iceskating, though, this season as it is too hard on the ankles. By the way, I was hit hours before most users were ever online at Epic, January 3rd, 2006 at 04:20 PM. (1,010). Does that state something?
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