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Oh my aching rear end

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I finally got out yesterday for my first snowboarding experience. (My daughter got a new board setup two seasons ago and I made her keep the old one for me.) I was the only one who showed up for the ski area's 3:00 group lesson so I ended up with a private. My instructor said that I did good. (Of course he wouldn't bust me down right away and tell me I sucked....especially since I was twice his age). Wow...what a different workout boarding is then skiing. I wasn't too bad at the toeside turns but heelside planted me on my butt enough times to be quite sore today. My abs hurt when I cough.

At least with years of skiing I wasn't quite as afraid of picking up a little speed and I didn't freak out about riding the lift. I'll be giving it another try next week. I'm not giving up until I can at least comfortably make it down a blue run.
post #2 of 17
You might want to try some other more familiar physical activity today. I felt awful the morning after my first day snowboarding, then I went cross-country skiing for a few hours and that seemed to work out much of the soreness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJCzar
I'll be giving it another try next week.
Good. A lot of folks find the first 2-4 days pretty rough. Stick with it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJCzar
I'm not giving up until I can at least comfortably make it down a blue run.
But why would you give up then? That's when the fun starts! :
post #3 of 17
SJCzar (you're not from San Jose by chance?),

Stick with it. My first day was in relatively soft, snowy conditions, so I didn't ache too badly once 4:00 rolled around. But day two was murder on the packed snow, and despite the padded shorts I think I did damage to my coccyx -- I don't know what, but after three weeks, it is still tender if I sit on it wrong.

The first tip, about the lift: scooch forward in the lift chair, stand with one hand behind your and stabilize yourself against the lift chair, weight your front leg and put your rear foot on the stomp pad, and just let the board slide itself down the ramp. I fell a bunch of times until I just "let go", so to speak -- didn't do anything 'cept stand there and let the board take me for a ride. Only after that got comfortable I began to work on turns and stops.

I've been really scared of speed, too, and it wasn't until I hit a couple of blue runs that I realized my culpret: on modest inclines and flats, it's pretty easy for me to forget about my downhill edge and let it touch snow, slamming me to the ground. That had me freaked out. On "blues", dealing with the slightly steeper angles, it's easier to avoid this pitfall.

On day two, my worst falls were on flats (that's where my hurt tailbone came from). As I worked on steeper terrain on day three, I realized the solution on flats was to always bias one edge or the other -- never just coast flat. Since then, no more slams, and I'm getting much more comfortable with speed and manuvering through crowds.

And for what it's worth, my Burton R.E.D. padded shorts with the hard tailbone and butt protectors seemed to work pretty well my last two days out. Despite their bulk, I'm going to stick with them for the foreseeable future.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. I'm planning on going to the Y tonight and get on the Eliptical for awhile...and of course a trip to the hot tub as well.

It sure is more comfortable walking around in snowboard boots than ski boots and I enjoy not having to mess around carrying skiis and poles....maybe I won't stop at blues and my skiis will sit lonely in the basement.

I think I'll go to the local boarding store and look for those Burton padded shorts before my next outing. My sore butt was the only thing that made me stop for the day.

Also... no I'm not from San Jose. I'm a Midwestern gal. Born and have lived most of my in the Milwaukee, WI area.
post #5 of 17

re....

Hydration, hydration, hydration...

actaully alone won't help your sore bottom. One thing I would suggest, try bananas the potasium helps with muscle soreness. I've also had good success with cranberry juice believe it or not. Cranberry juice helps your body repair...

In regards to bottom protection Burton as you mentioned previously makes on of the better quality pads I've seen.

Jonah D.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey, I had cranberry juice for breakfast this morning....I didn't know about those effects. I guess I'll have some for dinner tonight as well. I'm leaving my office for some errands, perhaps I'll have to pick up some bananas.

I've already called a few places this morning and located those shorts and am stopping after work for a pair.

I'm quite excited to give boarding a try again. I couldn't have been as bad as my daughter expected because her and her friends didn't hang around to laugh at me for very long during my lesson.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
OK, I'm leaving work at noon today to give it another try. I have my Burton padded shorts, although I do hope to spend less time on the ground this time.

I figured I'd try a few runs down the bunny hill myself and if I'm not feeling any improvement I'll sign up for a lesson again. I remember what I have to avoid doing and what I should be doing...now if I can just get my body to cooperate.

My goal today will be to make it down from the top of the lift to the bottom without a fall. Hmmm, that might be unrealistic but one can hope.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJCzar
OK, I'm leaving work at noon today to give it another try. I have my Burton padded shorts, although I do hope to spend less time on the ground this time.

My goal today will be to make it down from the top of the lift to the bottom without a fall. Hmmm, that might be unrealistic but one can hope.
Good for you! I believe a lot of skiers who try snowboarding decide to go back to skiing afterwards ... so by getting back on the horse again, you've already gotten farther than a lot of them.

Funny - my buddy who learned snowboarding while I was skiing had that exact same goal. On his second day on the slopes, he was able to do it... Of course, it was only 2pm and he called it a day RIGHT after he finished a run without falling.

I'm personally going snowboarding for the first time on Saturday... so I'll know your pain by next week.
post #9 of 17
good luck with your boarding experience;
remember to use your feet/ankles by keeping your knees slightly bent (in flexed athletic stance, like playing defense in baskeball) which should help deliver the uphill edge pressure.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the advice. I know I was having a problem last time with remembering to keep my knees bent...especially as I started feeling like I was getting a little out of control.

Well...I'm off. I'll let you know how it goes.
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Day two was a hugh improvement over the first time out. The padded shorts were great, although I probably only took 4 good shots to my rear end.

I was able to make it down with only one or two falls a run this time. I make it all the way to within about twenty feet of the lift one time and of course stopped focusing when I got to the flat and caught an edge and was down. Even when I thought I had my knees bent I tried to bend them a little more....definitely makes for a more stable ride and much easier turns and stops.

Might be going out again Sunday. It's quite addicting.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJCzar
Day two was a hugh improvement over the first time out. The padded shorts were great, although I probably only took 4 good shots to my rear end.

I was able to make it down with only one or two falls a run this time. I make it all the way to within about twenty feet of the lift one time and of course stopped focusing when I got to the flat and caught an edge and was down. Even when I thought I had my knees bent I tried to bend them a little more....definitely makes for a more stable ride and much easier turns and stops.

Might be going out again Sunday. It's quite addicting.
sounds like your doing very well SJCzar, nicely done!

are you linking turns (s-turns)?

another exercise for ya, traverse slowly across the run/fall line (when traffic is clear of course), practice little jumps, lifting your board off the snow and landing in same direction of travel.

if your riding with knees straight your board will slip out from underneath, if do this in that flexed athletic stance your board will have engaged/active edges and improve your control.

this helps you 1) keep your center of mass between knees 2) get more comfortable riding in an effective stance.

welcome to the darkside
post #13 of 17
You da man... err.. woman! I'm trying to postpone my first snowboarding experience another week. Apparently I'm the kind of guy with big wide feet, so I'm iffy about rental boots.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJCzar
Day two was a hugh improvement over the first time out. The padded shorts were great, although I probably only took 4 good shots to my rear end.

I was able to make it down with only one or two falls a run this time. I make it all the way to within about twenty feet of the lift one time and of course stopped focusing when I got to the flat and caught an edge and was down. Even when I thought I had my knees bent I tried to bend them a little more....definitely makes for a more stable ride and much easier turns and stops.

Might be going out again Sunday. It's quite addicting.
have you boarded some more?? how is it coming along?
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
I did end up going out the next Sunday but it was Demo Day and I really wanted to get a chance to try out some new skiis. I ended up demoing for hours and then only had time for one run on the snowboard. It was much more crowded then I was used to...since I had been going on weekdays. Too many obstacles to try to avoid to really get into any real groove on that one run. I was happy to have gotten off a lift that I hadn't been on before without a fall and after some falls at the top of the run I did alright on the second half.

I'm taking off work on Friday so we should get at least two full days in...maybe three. I plan on bringing both the board and my skiis. We're going to spend a day at one of my favorite Wisconsin resorts so I don't want to be stuck on just the green runs with the snowboard. Maybe I'll try to get another lesson in sometime as well. It sure couldn't hurt any.
post #16 of 17

Reduced-Fall Snowboarding?!

When I began snowboarding 3 years ago, I thought I was certainly going to destroy the base of my spine before I ever got the hang of it. Only with the encouragement of my teenage son did I stick with it for the 5-6 times it took to get beyond the busting-butt beginner phase. I am now an adaptive snowsports instructor at an east coast resort, and have recently begun concentrating on getting more adaptive students snowboarding.
One tool we have been working on that shows great promise (in my tiny rodent mind) for both adaptive and regular students is snowboard tethering. This is done using two C-clamps attached at the nose of the board and connected to tethers (webbing) about 15' long. The instructor hold the tethers and snowboards (or skis for that matter) behind the student. Rather than spending alot of time early on learning heelside/toeside slips and traverses, the student points straight down the fall line as the instructor has them transition from toeside/flatboard/heelside. The instructor can control the speed as needed (even stopping them if needed), and can assist as necessary with the tether on the turns. As the student gets comfortable with initiating and controlling the turns, the tethers come off, by which time the student is comfortable with the fall line and linking turns.
With adaptive students, we typically use outriggers, but these would not really be needed for able bodied students.
We have used this technique to teach several of our ski-based instructors how to ride and have had them linking turns totally independently on green slopes with only a half-dozen falls.
I'm sure many students would not want to use the uncool tether method, but I sure as hell would have loved to learn without having to spend a week working at my desk standing up!!

Chris S.
PSIA Level I Adaptive Snowboarding
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cesonnepe
One tool we have been working on that shows great promise (in my tiny rodent mind) for both adaptive and regular students is snowboard tethering. This is done using two C-clamps attached at the nose of the board and connected to tethers (webbing) about 15' long.
That's got to be quite a site on the beginner's slope, a bastardized form of kite surfing? Actually sounds like an interesting method to teach a certain CS spouse of mine.
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