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How do I get custom footbeds?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hey there, I've got a problem with my boots, leaving open blistering on the shins after particularly difficult ski days (days when I really really push it). A few ski shops have said that while the blisters are obviously from chafing, it might be caused by either "heel lift" in the boot and/or arch flattening (due to worn out footbed) which cause my shin to slightly change positions.

I am interested to replace the footbed (which is horribly wrinkled and flattened already.

Can somebody let me know where I should be going to see how ot replace a footbed? And how much it would cost? Also how much would it cost to have them pack out the boots a bit with extra padding.

FYI These boots are maybe 7 years old and Lange L10.
post #2 of 20
Where do you live? You may want to consider new boots, they are getting a bit long in the tooth.
post #3 of 20
7 year old boots.

It is time for new boots, period!
post #4 of 20
Pour melted lead into the boot. Insert foot.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
I meant to say that while the boots are 7 years old i've really only used them for the last 2 years because I was primarily snowboarding for 5 years. They're not that bad. But the footbeds are really lousy, just the $10 cushion that rests under your sole.
post #6 of 20
You can get custom footbeds from any reputable ski shop or a foot doctor. I've even heard of getting custom footbeds through the mail, but don't recommend that option unless you live a long way from a ski shop or foot doctor. One problem with footbeds is that making good ones is an art form. Finding a good footbed maker is not easy. Often times you will need to make several visits in order to get the footbed to fit just right.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
You can get custom footbeds from any reputable ski shop or a foot doctor.
If you have insurance and you go to your DR. they can prescribe custom foot orthotics. You will then either go to a podiatrist, pedorthist, or an orthotist (whoever your DR. refers you to) and they will do the custom orthos and your insurance should cover it. Custom (medical) orthos are the best IMO. I have them in my ski, snowboard soft, and snowboard hard boots. They are a great thing.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Interesting. So this work is for medical purposes, isn't it. After all, my legs are getting all ripped up. These orthodics sound like a great idea, I want something professional which can make my legs so much more comfortable. I assume that they will work in a ski boot?

I do have insurance with Great West. I live right next to a major city/university teaching hospitals too.

Would I simply call up my local PCP in boston and ask him to recommend a specialist? Is this the type of work which can be concluded by Thursday?

Thanks!
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billd
Interesting. So this work is for medical purposes, isn't it. After all, my legs are getting all ripped up. These orthodics sound like a great idea, I want something professional which can make my legs so much more comfortable. I assume that they will work in a ski boot?
Yes to all. You may have to leave a ski boot with them in order that they may fit the ortho to the boot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Billd
Would I simply call up my local PCP in boston and ask him to recommend a specialist? Is this the type of work which can be concluded by Thursday?

Thanks!
I don't know what kind of plan you have or how it will work. Call your rep or primary phys. to find out. Whether it could get done by Thurs. is up to the practitioner's availability and schedule as well as whether or not they do customs in house or if they outsource the work.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
hi and thanks for the help.

if i had to guess i'd say that you are eitber a doctor or somebody that just picked up exactly what I needed.
post #11 of 20
See this thread, might help with your shin problems

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=33116
post #12 of 20
Many foot doctors Podiatrists will make a sports foot bed for ski boots and a different foot bed for your everyday shoes. I have bad feet and have both. As one Podiatrists said my parents could have done a better job with my feet.

About 5 years ago I went to Keith Holmquist at The Pro Ski and Ride in Hunter NY. All my ski patrol friends in upstate NY have a lot of respect for Keith's abilities. Keith designs foot beds specifically for you in the your position of skiing to correct for many of your "shall we say" personal attributes. You stand in a machine that takes a cast in a natural skiing position. Many boots have numerous screw adjustments and Keith will adjust those as well.

To make a long story short I am now not only a lot more comfortable skiing, but I definitly ski much much better all because of Keith. Next year I will be getting new ski boots and I will be buying them from Keith.

I now also have foot beds designed by a Podiatrist for my regular shoes as well. Significant difference in how tired I am running, other sports, hiking, backpacking, and even just walking and standing around while shopping in the mall.

Tomorrow my plane leaves for 10 days at JH. See yah.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills
Many foot doctors Podiatrists will make a sports foot bed for ski boots and a different foot bed for your everyday shoes. I have bad feet and have both.>>>>>
About 5 years ago I went to Keith Holmquist >>>> Keith designs foot beds specifically for you in the your position of skiing to correct for many of your "shall we say" personal attributes.>>>> To make a long story short I am now not only a lot more comfortable skiing, but I definitly ski much much better all because of Keith.
I now also have foot beds designed by a Podiatrist for my regular shoes as well.
.
Catskills,(or anyone else who knows this stuff ), I think I could benefit from something like this. You say you have both a sports and a regular foot bed. Are they both from Keith and is he also a podiatrist? Or is one from a competent bootfitter (Keith) and the other from a podiatrist? I was wondering if one was clearly superior to the other and if they where interchangeable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills
Tomorrow my plane leaves for 10 days at JH. See yah.
I hope you can land at Jackson, what with all that snow Bob Peters is forecasting. I am leaving on Wed. for a road trip to Jackson, and just hope I-80 is open when I hit Cheyenne. Hope to be on the hill by Sat.!
I also hope to have my boots refit out there, maybe with custom footbeds. Anyone recommend a good bootfitter in and around Jackson?
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by yomingjack
.
You say you have both a sports and a regular foot bed. Are they both from Keith and is he also a podiatrist?
I can answer from my experience - the medical orthos will be made purpose specific. The orthos I have in my shoes are different from the ones in my boots and they are different from my b-ball/tennis orthos. All were custom made by orthotists and/or pedorthists.
post #15 of 20
One word of caution if you go to an ortho. Make sure you ask for full-foot footbeds. I got a pair made by an ortho once, and didn't know to ask. When I got the footbeds, they only went to the front of the arch. They were covered in neoprene that went the full length, but I could feel the end of the plastic footbed under my foot and it drove me crazy.

Personally, I like the red cork Superfeet with the rubber arch insert. The cork acts as a natural insulator and is more forgiving than some of the plastics that the orthos use. They run about $125-$150 at ski shops, which includes all the fitting.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billd
Hey there, I've got a problem with my boots, leaving open blistering on the shins after particularly difficult ski days (days when I really really push it). A few ski shops have said that while the blisters are obviously from chafing, it might be caused by either "heel lift" in the boot and/or arch flattening (due to worn out footbed) which cause my shin to slightly change positions.
That sounds a little weird (raw shins caused by footbed), but I guess their explanation sounds somewhat logical. If all you care about is the raw shins, I'd first worry about what kind of socks you're wearing in there, and similar questions.

Quote:
I am interested to replace the footbed (which is horribly wrinkled and flattened already.
Replacing the footbeds may be a good idea, completely aside from the shin issue.

Quote:
Can somebody let me know where I should be going to see how ot replace a footbed? And how much it would cost? Also how much would it cost to have them pack out the boots a bit with extra padding.
The other posts above tell you more about doctors than I can. The only thing I'd add is that I wouldn't assume that your insurance covers it without checking.

At a shop or a full-time bootfitter, customized footbeds, plus some moderate other boot-fitting help, would most likely run something over $100 and under $200. You can probably pay less, though I'd make sure you have a good recommendation before trusting someplace really cheap. You can also pay more, though for your purposes, it may not be warranted. As for what shop (and who, specifically, to ask for there), there's likely someone here who's in your locale and can make a recommendation.

You can buy off-the-shelf non-customized footbeds, for $30-$40 or so.

Quote:
FYI These boots are maybe 7 years old and Lange L10.
There's nothing inherently wrong with 7-year-old boots. There could be ... then again, there could be something wrong with day-old boots too. Boot design hasn't changed significantly, and boots typically last at least that long, so long as the liners don't get moldy or ripped up, and the hardware doesn't break.
post #17 of 20
There are lots of folks molding and selling footbeds, and a very small number that do a really good job. Here is one excellent shop in your area for both footbeds and all alignment and bootfitting needs:
Glen Scannell & Joe Perreault
North East Ski Systems
PO Box 564
Bethlehem, NH 03574
603-254-5749 (Glen)
603-254-5759 (Joe)
glenneski@aol.com

I've had both rigid and flexible custom footbeds. The flexible custom footbeds are better...the foot and ankle need to be able to move somewhat.


Ken
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by yomingjack
.
Catskills,(or anyone else who knows this stuff ), I think I could benefit from something like this. You say you have both a sports and a regular foot bed. Are they both from Keith and is he also a podiatrist? Or is one from a competent bootfitter (Keith) and the other from a podiatrist? I was wondering if one was clearly superior to the other and if they where interchangeable.
Keith did my foot beds for my ski boots. A podiatrist did my every day shoes which I also use in my running sneakers.
post #19 of 20
I bought Sole footbeds for my new boots just because I wanted added comfort. I had heard that a footbed gives you more space in the boot.

Well, not for me!

I did as directed, heated the footbeds and put them in the boot. This raised my feet in the boots so the top surface of my toes on my left foot were squished in the boot to where I couldn’t even move or feel them. Not exactly good for circulation. My right foot didn’t feel exactly comfortable either.

So I took the footbeds out and I use them now for my sneakers. They are very comfortable there, but NOT in my ski boots!

Luckily, my boots are snug and reasonably comfortable and don’t cause me problems. I can live without a footbed.
post #20 of 20
The Lange L10 is by no means an outdated boot... when people in the gear forum suggest that someone who hasn't done any skiing in the last 20 years get a new boot, its becasue those boots are of an outdated design. The L10 can hang with any high end boot made nowadays.
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