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Skier's Edge machine - Page 2

post #31 of 42

This machine

http://www.ski-simulator.com/

looks similar to the Skier's Edge

www.skiersedge.com

 

Any thoughts on how they compare?

post #32 of 42

In remember trying out a simulator of some kind years ago in the U.K. where the foot rests were were attached to an inclined beam which pivoted at ground level a point about 3 feet in front of the user. The foot rests would move side to side in an inclined arc against spring resistance and they also allowed each foot to be pressured individually. The resulting foot and leg motion was not just entirely lateral and felt much more ski-like. I managed to get the hang of it without poles after about 2 minutes and it was great fun. Does this description ring any bells with anyone?

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old School SL View Post

In remember trying out a simulator of some kind years ago in the U.K. where the foot rests were were attached to an inclined beam which pivoted at ground level a point about 3 feet in front of the user. The foot rests would move side to side in an inclined arc against spring resistance and they also allowed each foot to be pressured individually. The resulting foot and leg motion was not just entirely lateral and felt much more ski-like. I managed to get the hang of it without poles after about 2 minutes and it was great fun. Does this description ring any bells with anyone?


Maybe the Pro-Fitter?  Does this look familiar?

 

Product Page:  http://www.fitter1.com/Catalog/Items/PF2.aspx

 

 

post #34 of 42

I bought the whole package on craigslist for about 30% of thee cost.  Good work-out and particularly the mogul master attachment

post #35 of 42

Thx exracer but not even lose---it was back in the early 80's so there's a good chance the gizmo I used isn't even made any more---kinda like a lot of T.V. shopping fitness and fatbuster gizmos I guess. I did try grass ski racing for a couple of summers and it really got rid of a lot of bad on-snow habits but going back to grass from snow was hard work! Has any one else tried this as training recently? It seems to me that the mechanics of grass skiing would be much closer to two footed carving than it ever was to a more independent leg action and foot steering scenario.

post #36 of 42

are you interested in selling it. i am looking for one.

post #37 of 42

Very pleased with my Big Mountain model.  I can do more turns on the SE in half an hour than I can do all day on the hill.  Set it up in front of a window or mirror so that you can watch your angles and focus on different aspects during different workouts.  Work with and without poles.  Do as many turns as you can in one minute.  Cut that in half and maintain steady "speed" for five minutes.  PSIA members get a discount.  Shipping is expensive.   I bought a floor (demo) model at a ski show and got PSIA discount, saved on shipping 100%, and they knocked a bunch for buying a 'used' unit.  Contact SE ahead of ski show season and arrange to buy a demo model on the spot.  You will save a LOT.

post #38 of 42

Still have for sale?

thone@mi.rr.com
 

post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodee View Post

The Skier's Edge isn't supposed to "duplicate skiing". It's a plyometric exercise to prepare for it. Jumping off & on a box doesn't duplicate skiing either, but it's a good one too.

I still have the older version, which "goes to eleven" and is plenty resistance for me - my goal is to bottom it out every turn. I incorporate the Edge into lifting workouts ... a few sets of dead lifts followed immediately by 200 hard & fast turns can make you see stars.

Absolutely agree with you Woodee.  I use a classic Skier's Edge at my local gym in preparation for the ski season.  I like to do 3 - 4 sets of 200 turns (each set in well under two minutes), in conjunction with 3 - 4 sets each of something like push ups and kettle bell swings.  This forms just part of my supersetting gym workout.  Agility and flexibility exercises are thrown in with each superset as well as weights.  While the Skier's Edge is not a "do it all" machine, I've found it definitely improves rhythm, balance and cardio when done hard and fast.  Occasionally when doing short (weddeling) turns down ski slopes I can feel the rhythm of those thousands of preseason "turns" kick in nicely.  A very worthwhile machine for the preseason and I just wish my gym would upgrade to a Big Mountain or WC.

post #40 of 42

Hi,

 

I'm interested in buying your Big Mountain, please let me know if it's still available.

 

Thanks,

jeane1marie@yahoo.com

post #41 of 42

Right. Your comment is the difference between open chain and closed chain dynamics.

EJ LEVY

post #42 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeanemarie View Post
 

Hi,

 

I'm interested in buying your Big Mountain, please let me know if it's still available.

 

Thanks,

jeane1marie@yahoo.com

Welcome to EpicSki!  Note that the post about a Big Mountain Skiers Edge for sale is from 2009.  So it's unlikely to still be available.

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