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Skier's Edge machine

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Does anyone have direct experience with the Skier's Edge machine....does it help much, etc, worth the big bucks for it?
post #2 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMCM
Does anyone have direct experience with the Skier's Edge machine....does it help much, etc, worth the big bucks for it?
I've had one for years and I think it is worthwhile, but not at the initial price offering. If you contact them, then ignore the mailings until they offer $200 off the initial price, you obviously save $200.
post #3 of 42
I just picked up a used one, but trying to figure out how to use it..

Is there a videotape with a program on it or some instructions?
post #4 of 42
Thread Starter 

Good for skiing skills?

I know the Skier's Edge would probably be great from a workout standpoint, but how about for helping your actual skiing skills? I remember having the Nordic Track thing back in the early 90's....I used it for about 6 months before I ever went x-country skiing for the first time...and when I went, I picked up the x-country rhythm right away....I felt the Nordic Track definitely helped with that.

So I'm wondering about the skier's edge and downhill skiing. It sure has a lot of very strong recommendations from coaches, teams, instructors, etc.

Where did you get that used one...and for how much?
post #5 of 42
VK and I have one.

They are good for developing balance the first, say, five minutes you are on it. but that goes away once you are able to get on it without using the poles.

Its a good cardio workout, no doubt, if you monitor your hear rate and keep it up for at least 20 minutes. (depending on what shape you are in.)

for skiing skills, well, I'm not so sure. Its really not "dynamic" enough to mimic the true movements of skiing, unless you ski only on very groomed, very flat runs in perfect conditions, always. but in real skiing there is far more terrain involved, rollers, compressions, death cookies, you are constantly adjusting and using different skills to adapt to the terrain. The skiers edge doesn't provide that part of it.

As far as strengthing, as with any machine, it will work only certain muscles or muscle groups all the time. Good for targeting, but there is alot of other muscles involved when you get out on the mountain. Its not a big challenge for core strengthing.

As i said though, good for Cardio, if you put it in front of the air condioner on full blast, put on your goggles, and put on some good ski porn, its just a little more (Note I said "just a little") more interesting than an eliptical trainer or a stairmaster.

Mine is leaning up against the wall in the garage.
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMCM
I know the Skier's Edge would probably be great from a workout standpoint, but how about for helping your actual skiing skills?
It helps with rhythm, flexing the outside leg to release the turn, extension, balance (especially if you have the slope simulator attachment). It also helps to get a feel for keeping you upper body in a nice upright position (rather than banked).

I have one and don't use it much during the season, but I do use it some during the off season. However, the Harb Carvers I purchased last year do a better job for me from a skills point of view. The movements I do on the Harb Carvers are really the same I use for carving on skis.
post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jalexander
I just picked up a used one, but trying to figure out how to use it..

Is there a videotape with a program on it or some instructions?
Try it where you can see your shadow, or in front of a mirror, or where ever you can see you body move. The goal is to get the workout while keeping your upper body still. That's hard. The one I've used in a gym is the Big Mountain base with the Mountain Master individual foot thingies. I can transfer weight from foot to foot to move the machine to the other side and keep the drill going this way. I'm almost at the point of using it without poles. I tried the Powder/Mogul Master and found it very artificial feeling.

It is a very well made machine, and certainly not worthless, just not really worth the full price.

animation
http://www.skiersedge.com/ami/images/animatedred.gif

http://www.skiersedge.com/product/bms.html


Ken
post #8 of 42
Could anyone tell me the cost of the machine?

Just curious and not interested in buying one.
post #9 of 42

Skier's Edge

Quote:
Does anyone have direct experience with the Skier's Edge machine....does it help much, etc, worth the big bucks for it?
I've had the WC Plyometric model for about 3 years. My main conditioner for skiing is mountain biking, windsurfing and surfing in that order but after daylight savings goes and with all the wet weather around here the Skiers Edge has worked out well. Try to use it every evening except if there is a race the next day. As far as skiing skills go it is good for wide tracking with the footies all the way out plus lately I have been trying to coordinate my stomach muscles in a "screw down" MSRT style with the turn. That definitely is challenging.

If $$$ are a problem for your toys then it probably won't appeal to you. But remember the difference between men and boyz is the price of their............

- Fossil
post #10 of 42
I bought it locally for a few hundred bucks.. no clue how to use it

They always seem to have them on ebay, though
post #11 of 42
I would think that the movement is too lateral. Also, you are moving your feet away from you body instead of moving your body away from you feet.
post #12 of 42
I just jumped on The Skiers Edge 11 my neighbor gave me and never wanted back. I 'm trying to figure out what element is missing in the movement that would allow it to duplicate skiing better.

I think the fact that your feet only move laterally maybe it. The machine can only duplicate a straight line path. The movement is good at gaining the feeling of weight being on the downhill ski and the extension of the downhill leg. I think the curvature of the track represents what LeMaster in his book refers to as the virtual bump. But its obvious when you use it it's not the same as skiing. What is missing is the feeling of tipping and rolling your skis up on edge. When you stand on the machine you stand on it through the range of motion it offers pretty much flat footed moving laterally.

I think if you could use your ski boots and afix your boots to where you stand on the machine and create angles by being able to tip your feet maybe it would feel more like skiing. I think this is the element that is missing with this product.
post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I think if you could use your ski boots and afix your boots to where you stand on the machine and create angles by being able to tip your feet maybe it would feel more like skiing. I think this is the element that is missing with this product.
I'm not sure of the model you are using but mine has individual platforms that tip.
post #14 of 42
The Skier's Edge isn't supposed to "duplicate skiing". It's a plyometric exercise to prepare for it. Jumping off & on a box doesn't duplicate skiing either, but it's a good one too.

I still have the older version, which "goes to eleven" and is plenty resistance for me - my goal is to bottom it out every turn. I incorporate the Edge into lifting workouts ... a few sets of dead lifts followed immediately by 200 hard & fast turns can make you see stars.
post #15 of 42
I have a Skiers Edge Classic III in excelent condition. Bought it for my daughter. She used it 4 times (yes 4 times) and never again. I've got the whole setup including an additional single boot carriage and assistant coaching bar. I don't ski and I would like sell it. I'd like to get at least $400 for it.

Does anyone want to make me an offer...?
post #16 of 42
RG- sent you an instant message
post #17 of 42
I have the WC Plyometric /skiers edge and i thuinkit is well worthwhile. the foot platforms tip side to side and I have them set to also be free tipping fore & aft. The WC machine has a a third resistance band and the rails are much higher in the center then al;l the rest of the models. The combo of the "freefloating" feet and the additional resistance band andthe higher frame, combine to make this machine a challenge, build your hams and quads and create a feeling much closer to actual skiing.

140 turns in two minutes will absolutly kick your a _ _ on this thing!

Is any machine going to exactly duplicate skiing, probably not! But this is convenient and close to what it feels like to ski. It also has gates that count your turns and are adjustable width wise that force you to extend further to have the machine count a turn.
post #18 of 42
At a gym I was a member of they had a machine called a Fitter. It was pretty simple but I thought it was a good ski workout. Requires some balance.
post #19 of 42
Anybody looking to sell their Skier's Edge?
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Fossil View Post
I've had the WC Plyometric model for about 3 years.
- Fossil
I am not an expert skier or racer but probably an avid and constantly improving advanced intermediate skier. Should I be looking at the Big Mountain Series or the World Cup series? What is the difference and would it be inappropriate for someone who is not a racer and usually hangs out in the steeps and bumps and would just like to be a good carver and be able to handle variable terrain?
post #21 of 42
I have the mountain master 4 with all the bells and whistles. I originally bought it when my cub was racing for CBA. For quickness drills (plyometric sprinting) it is wonderful. Try to do 100 turns a minute accurately and it's worth becomes obvious. To improve the feel they added a slope simulator a few seasons back which approximates an actual slope. I do not have that attachment but I use a wooden shim to create the same set up (ramp angle) I have on my skis.
Like most simulators it has limitations though. IMO if the foot platforms had a few degrees fo pivot available it would resemble recreational skiing much more. The easiest way to describe this would be like the float angle in clipless bike pedals. Ten degrees in both directions would probaby be enough to satisfy my needs. It also has a limitation in that the cross under and cross through movements are the only transitions you can do on the thing. I suppose you could do a cross over by keeping the platform relatively still while inclinating but without the momentum of a real ski turn it is hard to simulate that type of maneuver. That's why I find inline skates useful. If you need to be indoors go to a skating rink. I suppose you could take the harb carvers there and see if the rink would allow you to use them there as well but IMO the skates eliminate the need to ask permission.

So IMO the bottom line is that the skiers edge is a tool for racers who are working on foot speed and cross-under / cross-through transitions. New they go for $1500+ which isn't a lot for a serious racer who can could abuse a lesser quality machine easily. Mind you for serious racers doing a lot of training it is only one activity in their training regimine. For a rec skier looking for a "do it all" simulator, I feel it wouldn't fill that role...
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssudha17 View Post
I am not an expert skier or racer but probably an avid and constantly improving advanced intermediate skier. Should I be looking at the Big Mountain Series or the World Cup series? What is the difference and would it be inappropriate for someone who is not a racer and usually hangs out in the steeps and bumps and would just like to be a good carver and be able to handle variable terrain?
Definitely contact the folks there for information. They will send you a free DVD with some great skiing by a contributor to this forum with all the info about the various models. Get on their mailing list so when they have specials you are notified so as to get a decent price break. After 3 years use I snapped a belt and those folks were very professional and speedy getting me repaired. I have been very sassified with my WC Plyo, of course as mentioned it is not the be all end all for training but then no single activity is...........

- Fossil
post #23 of 42
my wife is a Skier's Edge sponcered athletes: it is worth the investment!
Anyone who will be in the Killington area is welcome to trial!
post #24 of 42

skiers edge for sale?

Is anyone looking to sell there skiers edge machine? I would prefer a WC machine.

Thanks.
post #25 of 42

Does anyone have a Big Mountain or World Cup Skiers Edge machine, in good condition, that they might be interested in selling?  

post #26 of 42

Big Mountain available.  Send me a PM if you're interested.

post #27 of 42

I am interested in the Skiers Edge Big Mountain Series.  Please email me if anyone has one.  pikapp320@yahoo.com

 

Thanks,

 

A.J.

post #28 of 42

speaking of exercises, does anyone have any experience with some of the ski exercise training ebooks available for sale online.  Some say that wall sits are really bad for skiing.  at least they say that in their advertisements.

Has anyone bought and used their courses?

post #29 of 42

I have not use ski training ebooks, but I personally like wall sits. It's easy to see why people would say these are bad for skiing. You can feel the strain on your knees when you do them. Plus they develop your quads. Most skiers have over developed quads versus their hamstrings. This condition makes ACL injuries more likely.

post #30 of 42

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

I have not use ski training ebooks, but I personally like wall sits. It's easy to see why people would say these are bad for skiing. You can feel the strain on your knees when you do them. Plus they develop your quads. Most skiers have over developed quads versus their hamstrings. This condition makes ACL injuries more likely.

Thanks for this info.  That makes sense. 

 

I currently use a rebounder and bounce in a similar pattern that the Skiers Edge machine would take.  I like being able to focus on one leg at a time.  I think that increases my balance. 

I've been thinking about the limitations of ski specific machines and think that because skiing is a sport that uses dynamic balance machines that do not develop dynamic balance will be less than optimal.

A combination of activities including biking and blading hits on some of the properties of skiing balance and coordination.

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