New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Snapped Pole

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone ever had an aluminum pole snap?

I've bent a number of them and had them rip when bending back, but this one snapped instantly. I was moving at a good clip in hard pack/icy conditions rippin trenches and got sloppy with concentration. Skis shot out and I jamed the pole into the ice to keep from going down. I felt intense vibration... then "plink" and half of the pole was gone. Sounded just like hitting a golf ball with a metal wood. Couldn't find the lower half anywhere. Must have flown off into the trees.

Poles were a little scratched, but no damage anywhere to weaken them.
525x525px-LL-vbattach462.jpg
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco
Anyone ever had an aluminum pole snap?
Usually a couple of every season. Most times in wipe outs, but I've had poles snap on normal pole-plants...
post #3 of 16
You are likely lucky the pole broke on you. Might have saved you a broken wrist if just a hard pole plant on ice.

Usually a pole snaps when bent. Maybe you hit pole with a ski edge when it snapped. I have broken a few poles from planting in deep snow above a log under the snow - pole snapped when I when over the log easy as can be.
post #4 of 16
That photo suggests the pole was in major compression before it let go -- so in reality it probably buckled, like a column that is severely overloaded. These can be pretty spectacular failures, which jives with your description of the sound and the lower half launching. If it was a more brittle / less ductile material, it probably would have exploded into splinters and chunks. Pretty cool (well, except for the fact that you need to buy new poles!).
post #5 of 16
If you are looking for bombproof poles, get some Leki WC SL poles from artech (about 60 bucks). I have fallen on them in slalom 10+ times, sometimes catching them under the skis. They don't bend or break. However, I have broken my swix carbon gs poles (the ones the US team has). After I broke the one carbon pole, I got a rental one and snapped that in one fall after being hit by a snowboarder. Swix waranteed my pole . Aluminum slalom race poles are the most durable out there, IMO.

I would stay away from scott. A good racing buddy of mine broke 5 : of their DH poles in a row, all covered under warranty. The shop was livid, but they replaced them. I'd never buy a scott pole after hearing about that.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219
Pretty cool (well, except for the fact that you need to buy new poles!).
yea.. bummed because I had become very comfortable with those poles. Think I made it through 4 seasons (maybe 250+ days) with them.

Have had a pair of LEKI World Cups hanging in the locker for a couple of seasons. Nice poles but just didn't feel the same as the Scott WC's. Now have to get used to the feel of a different pole.
post #7 of 16
I am always surprised how poles feel different. I forgot my poles last week, and bought a pair of K2 poles. Never got used to them all day. They were only about 3/4" longer than my regular poles (Excel Carbon Fiber). That night, I did cut the K2 poles down a smidge so they match my other poles, and it will be interesting to ski them again and see if that was the difference. I am sure it's a combination of the grip, the pole construction, and the length that contributes to overall feel.

The sad thing about that day I forgot my poles -- all day long I was stumbling across abandoned poles leaning against trash cans, under the lift line, showing under the (then) thawing snow. I wish I waited a few runs before spending $45 on those poles -- could have had multiple sets of free poles for the day -- but the thought of skiing without poles scared me. I tried the free-carving routine once, and didn't really care for it. Never mind trying to get around in a lift line...
post #8 of 16

be happy for your wrist!

Agreed with above, it's probably good it broke, and released the load bearing on your hand/wrist, etc.

Am I the only one with Scott Carbon (CT2) poles here? Great grip on it too, that fit my hands better than Leki. Supposedly the design of a USC student from 2001 or 2002...

Aluminum poles break. I'm by no means hardcore and lightweight and have broken a pair every season or two before switching to carbon. Mmmm featherweight. Unecessary, but superlight.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAXtoDartmouth
Agreed with above, it's probably good it broke, and released the load bearing on your hand/wrist, etc.

Am I the only one with Scott Carbon (CT2) poles here? Great grip on it too, that fit my hands better than Leki. Supposedly the design of a USC student from 2001 or 2002...

Aluminum poles break. I'm by no means hardcore and lightweight and have broken a pair every season or two before switching to carbon. Mmmm featherweight. Unecessary, but superlight.

Aren't you saying that

on one hand,
the pole breaking probably saved him injury...

...but on the other hand,
you prefer a pole that won't break under the same load?

:


post #10 of 16
Last year I was in a glade at Sunday River and went off a bit of a cliff. I landed fine but with such force that I popped out of both bindings and went head over heels (so I guess I didnt land fine?) , sticking my poles into the ground where one broke and the sharp end slid its way betwee by arm and chest, ripping my jacket and almost impaling me. My 3rd set of broken poles that month, and I dont even race.

Anyway- what are the best sturdy, aluminum/steel/whatever poles out there. I dont like the carbon thing as I feel that they wobble a bit too much. Any opinions?
post #11 of 16
call me a new be all u want but this is way I don't like poles
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctown
call me a new be all u want but this is way I don't like poles
You need them once you reach a certain point in your skiing, both for balance while carving and for an upweighting aid on very steep slopes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brock Landers
Anyway- what are the best sturdy, aluminum/steel/whatever poles out there. I dont like the carbon thing as I feel that they wobble a bit too much. Any opinions?
Leki WC SL. The most durable one I have used, anyway. That trigger thing can save your thumb in a bad enough fall, as well.

https://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/...egory_Code=032
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAXtoDartmouth
Am I the only one with Scott Carbon (CT2) poles here? Great grip on it too, that fit my hands better than Leki. Supposedly the design of a USC student from 2001 or 2002...
I've had some Scott Carbons for a long time now, maybe 10 years. I love them! They seem indestructible. From a safety perspective maybe that is bad but you really don't want to protect from a hard fall with your pole. That can really tweak your wrist/arm/shoulder. If I'm going down I tend to put my hand out and wrench my thumb back.
post #14 of 16
I have a pair of old Kerma poles from about 20 years ago. They seem to be sturdier than the poles nowadays (you know, a little bulkier)..
When I went skiing last weekend, I saw somebody break a pole while sitting on the lift!
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skicrazed
I have a pair of old Kerma poles from about 20 years ago. They seem to be sturdier than the poles nowadays (you know, a little bulkier
I have a pair of those too. I skied with them until this year when I broke down and bought a pair of $7 poles at the local ski swap. The strange thing is that up until this season I had assumed that it was just inescapable that my hands would swell up after a day of skiing. It hasn't happened at all this year. I think it was those poles that never gave and inch. They trashed my hands.
post #16 of 16
I have broken several poles by falling on them in a spill. I then bought a pair of Leki Welt Cups and proceded to break my ribs by falling on them in a spill. The poles are still in service, I just fall less now.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion