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Help... Been out of skiing for about 7 years!

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Ok I need help purchasing equipment. I quit smoking and decided this is the year I will start skiing again!!!

I need all new equipment and have ~1000 to spend on Ski's, Bindings, Boots and Poles etc. Looking around on the web (Where are all the reviews at??) I think I am looking for something like a K2 Escape 3500 or eqivienlent, but not sure what size? I am 5'7 175lbs.

I am not much into skiing off cliffs but will follow my friends into Blacks, at least I used to. Not much into the bumps, I like to ski kinda fast making turns and staying in control going into the air every now and then I ski 80% of the time on groomed trails. I will never be racing through the gates. I guess just a casual go out and have fun skiier.

Now... What Ski's, Bindings, Boots would you suggest?

Any help is appreciated!! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

-Mike
post #2 of 18
Good time to start scouring the shops for last year's model equipment at steep discounts. Before you go shopping, head down to your local library get the buyers guides in the ski mags from last year. That's a way to get started. Then you can read some of the threads here in epicski for reviews etc. With $1,000 you should be able to pick-up a great set-up. I suggest you also check some of the ski swaps. Equipment has changed a lot in the last seven years so you might want to invest in a lesson or two as well. Good luck, great to have you back in the sport!
post #3 of 18
This is a perfect time of year to do some shopping. Just don't rush into a shop and wave a pile of greenbacks around.

Take your time. The trend is shorter now and skiing is easier. You were probably on 195's when you quit. You should probably be OK (we are talking eastern conditions here?) on something in the 160/170 range. If the shop has a "sweet deal" on a pair of 188's ...... run the other way real fast.

Take lessons. The skis have changed the sport for the better but you need to understand how the shaped ski will work .... don't think of them as instructors ..... think of being de-programed.

Hit five or six shops just for "informational purposes" then post and a few of the Mass Ho__ er ....... Mass Bears will probably be glad to share their take on the shops.
post #4 of 18
If you can before you buy,....

DEMO, DEMO, DEMO!
post #5 of 18
Ski technology has changed quite a bit, so I recommend the following website for reviews:

Peter Keelty

Try eBay for everything except the boots once you've demoed and made a choice. Spring is the best time to shop for ski gear there, so you'll have plenty of time to try a variety of skis.
post #6 of 18
Go short and shaped. I would suggest 155-165.

Figure out what size boot shell you need, buy a used shell and stick a new liner in it to save a few bucks.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Rusty Guy:
Go short and shaped. I would suggest 155-165.
Yea or maybe a little longer if you want a bit more versatility, but I dunno.

Quote:
Figure out what size boot shell you need, buy a used shell and stick a new liner in it to save a few bucks.
Beg to differ in this one. Spend the most money on a good pair of boots from a good fitter. Learned this one the hard way.

Like the person before said, don't walk into a ski shop waving bills around and asking for a complete setup. You should be able to do very well for way under $1000. "Economize" on skis..you should be able to get a great pair of last season's skis, or if you find something you like, go look on ebay.

[ October 05, 2002, 04:12 PM: Message edited by: Lodro ]
post #8 of 18
Find a good pair of "carving" skis and, as noted above, take the time to get instructions on the new technique needed to get the most out of the new shaped skis.

This may seem like a no-brainer but you'd be surprised at the massive number of intermediate/advanced skiers who still skid excessively with the newer shaped skis. These same skiers keep wondering why their newly-purchased, ever-fatter skis are no easier to ski in cut-up powder, crud, wind-crust, etc. than their old skis.

Depending on your prior experience and permanence of old habits, it can take a while to adjust your skiing. I was a weak level 9 skier on old, straight skis and it took me at least 2 years of ski vacations (and 2 pairs of shaped skis) to modify my technique. However, I'm sure glad I invested the effort and I'm never going back to those old faithful relics in my closet.

Good luck.
post #9 of 18
what bigharvey said x 10 & hopefully you will end up with good instruction, I think he nailed it with this statement - This may seem like a no-brainer but you'd be surprised at the massive number of intermediate/advanced skiers who still skid excessively with the newer shaped skis. These same skiers keep wondering why their newly-purchased, ever-fatter skis are no easier to ski in cut-up powder, crud, wind-crust, etc. than their old skis.

before all that though "boots" are the most important piece of gear you will ever own, if you want to ski well it will be worth the investment in buying boots & footbeds from a good bootfitter. also give the bootfitter as much info about what you want to do get this right & you have a good building block to start with. good luck
bteddy
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Where do I find a boot fitter?

I went looking around some of the local shops just browsing and most of the places have everything marked at retail. I don't plan to pay even close to that..

I saw a pair of K2 5500's for $500 bucks. I saw the same ski's on the net for $280. Thats some serious markup.

I guess its been awhile.. I don't remember boots being 300-500 bucks!!

I guess I'll take some lessons as it has been awhile and with new different types of ski's who knows how I'll do.

Thanks for the help!

Any preference on Ski Bindings? [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #11 of 18
TTA89,

Something to consider. A number of people need some type of work done after boot purchase to get their boots "dialed in" (neutral position being one of these) given each person's anatomical concerns. If you are not in this "dialed in" position while skiing, you will not be able to ski most effectively/efficiently with your new gear. In my recent experience, I purchased a boot from a vendor based on price. Ultimately I ended up going to a boot fitter to have cant/stiffness/ramp angle/etc adjusted to improve my skiing. I also had a pair of custom orthodics made. It was amazing to feel the difference in my skiing. Subtle movements have replaced the more aggressive movements that were required before my boots were "dialed in". I would have been much better off (dollar wise and skiing wise) if I had purchased my boots from this boot fitter originally at retail, as many of these adjustment would have been included for no additional fee in the purchase price. I've learned my lesson. IMO boot purchases should not be made on price alone. If you are an avid skier, the services from a good bootfitter are worth every dollar spent.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by TTA89:
Where do I find a boot fitter?

I went looking around some of the local shops just browsing and most of the places have everything marked at retail. I don't plan to pay even close to that..

I guess its been awhile.. I don't remember boots being 300-500 bucks!!
Yep, plan on spending 300-500 bucks on boots (500 should be at the very high end, 'cause it doens't sound like you need a really high-end boot) as Keoki said it will be worth it. You will prob. only get like 10-15% off at a city shop right now. Bopots aren't really discounted like skis are anyway in my expereince. And it doens't make sense to buy them at the end of the season unless you really no what you want (like you've had the exact saem pair before) because you have to get them dialed in. (Great post on that Keoki.)

But ***important*** point -- not just any shop will do. You could easily pay retial for a boot fit incorrectly by some guy who doesn't have the first clue about fitting. :

Where are you located? Maybe some bears know of a good shop near you.

Quote:
I saw a pair of K2 5500's for $500 bucks. I saw the same ski's on the net for $280. Thats some serious markup.
This is really the worst time to buy to find a deal. So no no no, you should not buy skis in a shop right now unless you have money to blow or you see last years model on the rack for at least 30-40% off.

Quote:
Any preference on Ski Bindings? [img]smile.gif[/img]
Doesn't much matter; personal preference, just get a recent binding in your din range. You can pick these up on internet as well. [Edit: Make sure that they are compatibile with your skis!]

Figure low end:

400 boots (shop)
300 skis (internet)
125 bindings (internet)
35 mount, etc..(shop)

you're good to go for < $900 or so.

[ October 07, 2002, 03:47 PM: Message edited by: Lodro ]
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am in the Boston Area. Ski Market is having a Big Sale starting Tuesday. I am going to drive into New Hampshire (No Tax) and take a look. If I see a pair of Skis and Bindings for close to internet prices I will probably buy them. I don't know where to even start looking for Boots though :

I have wondered how shops feel about you walking in with skis, bindings and Boots that you bought elsewhere and say please put these together even though I didnt buy them from you.

Just as a Reference I race cars in the summer and I buy tires off the net cause they are so much cheaper and the tire shops HATE it when I come in asking to mount and balance them since I didnt buy them there and charge me 10 times what it should cost to do it. : :

DIN setting? Is that the setting at which the bindings release at? How do I know what I want mine set at?

[ October 08, 2002, 06:57 AM: Message edited by: TTA89 ]
post #14 of 18
Boots should be available at the swaps too, and more so than skiis, prior year's models should be at the shops (with steep discounts). While the shops wished you had purchased your gear from them, most are happy for your business and will happily do the mountings regardless. They lost the equipment sale, but that is no reason to lose your service sale. You might be back for waxes, tune-ups etc. Talk to the tech if you can and slip him an extra $10.

DIN's is German, means the standards by which release force is measured. The shop that mounts the bindings will set the din release according to the answers you provide them about your weight, ability etc. They take care of that.

Good luck!
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by TAMSki:
They lost the equipment sale, but that is no reason to lose your service sale.
Ditto. Normally they'd throw in the mount & tune (which is all that needs to be done), but they'd be happy to charge $40 or wahtever for it.
post #16 of 18
TTA,

Some good advice here. Definitely go for the boots first, and do it right. Don't skimp on boot fitting. Going to a good boot fitter may cost more in the short run but will pay off in more comfort, better fit for better performance, and a more appropriate boot choice. I know too many people who have skimped on boots by buying at some bargain basement sale where there is no one available to do fitting who ended up buying another pair of boots because the cheapies didn't work for them.

Because you've been out of skiing a while, you're probably not going to care much about the difference between this year's models and last year's, or even the year before. If you look around you may be able to find some good used skis and bindings for an economical price that would last you for couple of seasons. As someone suggested, do a little research at the library or on the net to find out which models might be appropriate for you.

Shops usually sell their demos once they are no longer current models, but be sure to look for skis that have not been tuned so many times that they are worn out. A better bet may be the classifieds, or if you know someone who works at a ski area you might find instructors or other employees who are selling last year's equipment at good prices. Besides the price of the skis you'll probably have to pay for a fresh tune and perhaps re-drill to move the bindings, which shouldn't total more than about $40.

Welcome back to skiing. Hope your season goes well.

Cheers
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, I value the advice given. I am not really concered about the cost. If good boots that won't kill and freeze my feet are $500 bucks then so be it. I WANT to do it correctly. I need to look around and talk to some people that are into the sport as much as you guys to find a good local place that will get me a good pair of boots.

What is it that they do to customize the boots to my feet? I can call around and ask if they do this but I would like to know what it is that they are really doing. Is it just a custom liner?

I have been reading alot on the net and I think I am going to pick up a set of K2 5500s they should allow me to get back in and start skiing as well as allow me to learn and get better. Last years model is fine with me, very few people can even tell anyways I havent read much about the size I need to figure that out as well.

So anyone in this area know of a place to get boots? [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #18 of 18
have you tried the epicski master bootfitters list?

EpicSki Index of Boot-Fitting Masters

[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

mxp
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