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Repair On New Skis

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
First time out on my new pair of skis, purchased on Friday and just received back from the tuners TODAY. Went out, and in the first 10 minutes of skiing, hit a rock. The damage (located on the middle of one of the skis) looks a look better in real life then when blown up to this size. Is this something I can fix myself or something I should send back to the tuners to fix? Any REAL performance altering damage done (don't know how to tell if I hit the base or just the wax)? I normally wouldn't care except for the fact that they're so new.



post #2 of 19
I'd take them to the shop, the repair will last longer.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
The original tune was $85, do you know about how much I can expect to pay for a repair? I called the shop and described the damage to them and he said that it honestly wouldn't make a difference and to just bring them in when its time for another tuning. Any thoughts on that?
post #4 of 19

I'd get it fixed

Since it's so close to the metal, especially if it is on your inside edge. If you ski on ice I think the force will be concentrated on that spot and rip out more ptex. If they are GS11's you can't just switch skis to the other foot so that it's your outside edge. If it was more towards your tips or tails I wouldn't bother.

I have a pair of 916s with a chunk out at the edge right under the binding, and I have to repatch it with a gun every couple of days on ice - skiing on soft snow doesn't affect it.
post #5 of 19
If it were me (and it's a bit hard to tell from the photos - the two pictures look a lot different ... I'll take your word that it looks worse in the pictures than real life):

I'd fix the PTex myself, knock down whatever damage you did to the edge with a diamond stone, and file some to get the edge into decent condition. It's hard to tell, but it looks like you didn't get the edge that bad. Next time you're going in for a grind anyway, point it out to the shop.

Put that edge on the outside. I don't know why you can't switch GS11s from foot to foot.
post #6 of 19
I've had this happen a lot skiing in CO. Since you just spent $85 on a tune I'd just buy some PTEX and drip it into the holes and smooth it out the best you can. Unless you are a racer, I'd definitely wait until the next time you need a tune.
post #7 of 19

GS11s

Have a asymetrical tip for gates - you can switch, it just looks funny.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by c1er
Have a asymetrical tip for gates - you can switch, it just looks funny.
Except:
- The current model doesn't (have an asymetrical tip, that is). Of course, I don't know what year the original poster has ... or if he has GS11s, for that matter.
- I ski with asymetical tips backwards all the time.
- I think (haven't done this) you can pull the tips off and change them, if you're so inclined.
post #9 of 19
A good shop will probably put some nice ptex in there and make it all happy for 5-15 bucks with wax/deburr or a tune. The fact that the edge is exposed makes the edge a bit more vulnerable should you run it sideways over a rock, stump, etc. The metal will tend to grab and is more likely to get yanked. Get it fixed and be done with it & you won't have to grimace so hard if you slide over a rock again.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Had it looked at by my tuner (mike de santis) and he said that my ski would be fine and when racing, to just make sure its on the outside (they are current GS11 race stock, tips are identical). He said if I wanted it fixed he would have to retune the entire ski, and at $85, I'm all set. I'm a racer so, every little bump and second counts.

Does anyone know of someone around Framingham MA that could just fit up that one spot (doing a great job) without retuning the entire ski?
post #11 of 19
Ouch! It hurts that they are your new skis, and I share your pain.. IMHO, the hole might get caught on some rocks or something, and I'd be worried about it while I ski..so, I'd get it fixed.
post #12 of 19
I may be nuts (or bad at reading photos), but I'd be more worried about the edge than the base. I don't think you got the edge real bad, but it may not be possible to put it back to perfect without a full tune.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
I may be nuts (or bad at reading photos), but I'd be more worried about the edge than the base. I don't think you got the edge real bad, but it may not be possible to put it back to perfect without a full tune.
The edge is fine, it's already looking perfect after a very light file. The only thing I'm worried about is the base since it's kind of protruding from the bottom of it. The pictures make it look a lot worse then it actually is.

Should I just get the full $85 tune over again or does anyone know of someone who can do a touchup?
post #14 of 19
Do use "Metalgrip" repair P-tex (co-poly - http://www.tognar.com/base_repair_to...es_damage.html)

Don't drip a P-Tex candle (too much carbon, won't adhere well, will shrink over time)

More than likely you should bring it to a shop, BUT there's no gurarantee that they're going to repair it correctly either. You need to ask questions about how they will be repairing the base shot that has exposed the edge. If they're just going to drip a p-tex candle into the holes run away quickly.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
Do use "Metalgrip" repair P-tex (co-poly - http://www.tognar.com/base_repair_to...es_damage.html)

Don't drip a P-Tex candle (too much carbon, won't adhere well, will shrink over time)

More than likely you should bring it to a shop, BUT there's no gurarantee that they're going to repair it correctly either. You need to ask questions about how they will be repairing the base shot that has exposed the edge. If they're just going to drip a p-tex candle into the holes run away quickly.
Funny because my wife did similar damage to her Atomics the first day out this season. Mike also tunes our skis so I was not going to grind the pair for another $80.

I just used metal grip and ptex ribbon.
post #16 of 19
I think this is fairly minor damage, and I would fix it at home. This is well within the range of home ski tuners. You can do a local repair on that spot with a p-tex candle, ribbon (or gun if you have one), let it cool, then level it back down. I probably do 2-3 of these repairs every season.

Definitely no need to get a full retune.

Craig
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Anyone have some written instructions on how to do a repair like this and a possible list of materials / tools I will need (probably be using p-tex ribbon and metal grip as that seems the most durable)? I really don't want to spend over $30 for materials but I don't want to have to fix this spot again. I have temporarily (have race tomorrow) filled it with some wax so we shall see how it holds. The damage is only about 2cm long in total so, I thought the tune would be a little over the top.
post #18 of 19
For excellent information on base repair and tools, go to www.tognar.com
(like Noodler said ) I hope the race went well today.
Best of luck on repairing your skis!!
post #19 of 19
Here are some instructions with an equipment list:
http://www.racewax.com/tunebaserepair.html
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