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Whats wrong w/Daleboot?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Am I missing something...I can spend $600 on a custom built Daleboot that includes a formable liner and free bootwork for life. Or I can spend $600 on a top line boot from a mainstream manufacturer, another $150 on a liner and then spend some more money to get it to fit right if there are problems. Seems like Daleboot should be the hands down winner.

Why are there not more people on Daleboot? Am I missing something? What have you heard pro and con about this boot?

I did a search but only found a couple older threads with not much info or feedback. Thanks.
post #2 of 13
I've never seen one, but I'd venture to say that when people see a "race" moniker attached to something that looks like this:


They run in the opposite direction. That boot looks incredibly wide and voluminous. No thanks, I'll take some plugs.
post #3 of 13
Daleboot is a great boot for those skiers out there who have extremely special needs when it comes to their feet/lower legs fitting into their boots properly. DD223 is right when he says that most racer types will run in the opposite direction, but IMO that is not the market they are directed to. I do know a skier who uses them, and in order to ski, he HAS to use them. If it were not for Daleboot he would not be able to ski. His two boots are nearly completely different from each other and have been custom built to his feet and legs as a result of some sort of medical condition (don't know the exact details). So, as to your question: I don't think anything is wrong with them, but I also don't think that most skiers out there NEED them. Those who do require that type of customization require it to be able to enjoy the sport.
Later
GREG
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb
Am I missing something...I can spend $600 on a custom built Daleboot that includes a formable liner and free bootwork for life. Or I can spend $600 on a top line boot from a mainstream manufacturer, another $150 on a liner and then spend some more money to get it to fit right if there are problems. Seems like Daleboot should be the hands down winner.

Why are there not more people on Daleboot? Am I missing something? What have you heard pro and con about this boot?

I did a search but only found a couple older threads with not much info or feedback. Thanks.
DD223 got it right, I think. and I think the absence of Daleboots on the feet of most skiers is NOT a testament to their impeccable craftsmanship or hidden immense value, but rather, the fact that they haven't performed well enough for enough people to see them multiply on skiers' feet.

for a good contrast, look at how the Raichle/Krypton held cult status while out of the market, and now has come back to huge praise in the past 1.5 seasons.
post #5 of 13
From personal experience, there is nothing spectacular about their shell. At this point most good boots have adjustable cant, variable flex, adjustable footboard, etc. They simply make it in a variety of sizes so that you can get a good shell fit without grinding punching etc. To this they add a very good heat moldable foam liner that works quite well.

As to why they are not more popular. They have very limited distribution, their boots look incredibly unsexy (their odd reverse buckle-bail system looks downright 70's), and most people haven't even heard of them.

And a final caveat, if you have a foot problem that really needs a custom footbed to correct, then a daleboot will not help. Still, if you're like me wear a 4E shoe, and don't care about how cool your boots look, it's not a bad choice.

Anyone else who has used them like to comment?
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for the feedback.

DD223, the boot only looks wide, if it is custom fitted to your foot, ankle and lower leg I can hardly see how it is overly wide. It does look old style though because the 3 piece shell design has not been changed in probably close to 20 years, combined with the bail system makes it very old school. Granted It won't be a plug.

I don't have any special needs other than a very narrow heel and a b width forefoot. I was looking for new boots and was steered to them. Just thought at $600 for a custom fitted boot and liner, totally dialed in to your foot seemed a deal (assuming vanity does not rear its head).

Maybe I should ask it this way. Why have people avoided going w/Daleboot as an option? Reading Jeff Bergeron (sp?) thread on boots seems to reveal a lot of people w/problems that the Daleboot would seem to avoid. Are you giving up something by going to a Daleboot if you could fit into another manufacturers high end boot satisfactorily (other than looks)?

Thanks all.
post #7 of 13
Daleboot's specialty is problem feet. narrow isn't a "problem" that is well handled by the Dale, which creates a fair amount of padding between the foot and the shell.

a narrow B width foot is better served in a Krypton or a plug, I think. and most likely, the plug will be best. plugs tend toward B widths as it is, I think.
post #8 of 13

I had a pair

I had a pair of Daleboots and liked them pretty well. Seems to me that the biggest disadvantage is that they aren't anywhere except their shop and their web page. I've run across several people at Alta that just loved the boots and had used them for many years.

They also have (or at least had) an excellent program for family's with growing kids allowing boots to grow as the kids grow (I forget the details, but basically a trade-in program and recycling the used shells).
post #9 of 13
I've got a story. My Lange X09s are getting old. Maybe 300 days without an issue. But sometimes the top buckle comes undone and the power straps aren't holding. So I figured I'd go and look at the mess at Northstar and get Superfeet to see if they could put a new power strap on. Yep, they say, but your liners are shot and your shell is broken. Fortunately they sell Langes there. 120 MF FR looked cool but they're $599 : and they're still charging full retail : Hang on. My wife has Daleboots and loves them. She's working in Salt Lake, Why don't I anti up $599 (it ends up more with power straps and spare heals and stuff) and get some custom (retro) boots too. We could match : Long story short. Next weekend I'm off to SLC and will return with a pair of Daleboots. Folks who have them swear by them. But they're not for the racing crowd (I think they have a specialized boot for that). The biggest issue seems to be their distribution network and, for some, their dated appearance.

Oh, and I get to spend some time with my wife in the wild and exotic Park City
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncle crud
Daleboot's specialty is problem feet. narrow isn't a "problem" that is well handled by the Dale
Yeah, I sometimes dream of having that "problem". :

Oh, I should also mention that Jeff Bergeron once stated that he felt Daleboots had too much forward flex for most people. However, should you find it too soft, they can do a number of things to easily stiffen up the boot.
post #11 of 13
Theres nothing wrong with Daleboot. He is North Americas only custom boot maker and not just a boot fitter. In fact most of the innovations in ski boot design was first done by Daleboot. Others waited for his Paten's to run out before they used his work on thier boots. In fact Dale was the first to make a Plastic shell boot. Lange stole his Idea. Dale sued and won. Lange had to start paying him a royalty. The real story of Daleboot isn't more popular is, he is a much better boot builder and inventor then he is a businessman. He should have put more time and energy into trendy colors and and buckle design and less time on making a very plain Jane looking boot that will last you for years.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks all for the input. I am in 100% agreement that he is probably the person to see when dealing with problem feet. My two areas of concern are:

1. If i only have narrow feet (between B width and C width forefoot w/narrow ankles) am I receiving inferior performance boots by going w/Daleboot such as Uncle Crud noted. Does he not have narrower lasts, and only plugs up the space with dense foam?

2. Is it only the Deer Valley crowd that utilize his boots? In other words is there a performance tradeoff if I am an upper end skier and ski in his boots? aschick mentioned potentially too much forward flex, any other posters with this experience or opinion. FYI I have posted this to Jeff Bergeron but have not heard back yet. When I do I will update this thread.

Once again thanks for the input, and I appreciate all thoughts and opinions on this.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb
2. Is it only the Deer Valley crowd that utilize his boots? In other words is there a performance tradeoff if I am an upper end skier and ski in his boots? aschick mentioned potentially too much forward flex, any other posters with this experience or opinion.
I can definitively say I am not a Deer Valley kind of person, but I skied there once. I've got duct tape on my gloves, holes in my ski gear (but I do have a Bogner fart suit), and core shots in my skis. I'm an upper end skier, although not technical - my formative years were spent in Europe and Squaw Valley. And I actually like the concept of variable flex for when I'm playing on a mono-ski. And I don't give a %#&^ about how trendy my boots (or equipment - remember I run a mono ski : ) is. I just do it. And after next week I'm going to be doing it with Daleboots.
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