or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Boot Alignment Cost

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Umm.. hey, how much does boot alignment generally cost? I got quoted a price of $50 CDN here in the local area for 2 degrees off on one leg. Is it really all that much better afterwards?
post #2 of 29
20 bucks at The pro ski and ride
hunter mountain ny
post #3 of 29
What do you mean by boot alignment?
post #4 of 29
do you have langs, if you do they make peices that you replace the heel and toe intserts by simply unscrewing them, these correct 1.5 degrees
post #5 of 29
If they know what they are doing, that is not unreasonable. 2 degrees is a lot- I was off that much, and after Bud Heishman balanced my boots it made an astounding difference, so much that I would not have believed it if I hadn't been skiing them. He gave me a test run first by putting layers of duct tape under the side of the AFD to simulate the effect and it took all of 2 turns to convince me.
post #6 of 29
You have to ask: "what's included in the alignment?" Is it just the assessment? Or are they going to install cant strips under the bindings? Or better yet, plane the soles of your boot?

Matter of fact, I just had an assessment done last night (kudos to Brian Beaumont at Ski Center in D.C.) along with some cuff alignment adjustments. Boot tech spent an hour with me and charged me $25. I found this to be very reasonable, especially after discovering the cuff alignment on my boot was flip flopped.

I was all prepared to hand him my boots for the planing (which they get $100 for). Instead, he told me to experiment w/the duct tape first before deciding to go that route. FWIW, I'm knock kneed - 1 degree off on my left and a whopping 3 degrees on my right.
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski_steep
Matter of fact, I just had an assessment done last night (kudos to Brian Beaumont at Ski Center in D.C.)
the Beaumonster is a good cat.
post #8 of 29
jonpole, at 2 degrees, you'll notice it right away.

FWIW, last year at the ESA, nolo noticed 1/4 degree when Bud adjusted her a bit. :
post #9 of 29
I don't know much about sole canting. Let's say you're bow-legged. Would you add duct tape to the inside or outside of the foot to fix it?
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
I don't know much about sole canting. Let's say you're bow-legged. Would you add duct tape to the inside or outside of the foot to fix it?
Outside
post #11 of 29
Payed $100 for sole planing, rebuilding of boot bases, I was off at least 2 degress and 1 1/2 on the other leg. The money is well spent even if you are not good enough to know the difference. Why? Because if you have everything done that can be done to get you "aligned and balanced, you can never blame your lack of skiing technique on that aspect again.
post #12 of 29
Ski Steep, you're probably right about putting the shim on the outside of the ski, but when I strain my little brain about it I keep coming up with "inside" as the answer to that question. Appreciate it if you would walk me through it.

Thanks,
JoeB
post #13 of 29
At GMOL, I paid $100 for a 1/2 degree on the right and an 8mm lift. And it was worth every penny.

-T
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeB
Ski Steep, you're probably right about putting the shim on the outside of the ski, but when I strain my little brain about it I keep coming up with "inside" as the answer to that question. Appreciate it if you would walk me through it.

Thanks,
JoeB
I believe there are exceptions to this rule, but think of it this way: If you're knock kneed (like I am), that means you favor the inside edges of your ski. In order to alleviate this and get the ski flat, you want to build up the inside area of the ski/boot. This will have the effect of raising the inside portion of the ski/boot interface thereby flattening the ski. Experiment at home w/duct tape and you'll see what I mean.
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski_steep
I believe there are exceptions to this rule, but think of it this way: If you're knock kneed (like I am), that means you favor the inside edges of your ski. In order to alleviate this and get the ski flat, you want to build up the inside area of the ski/boot. This will have the effect of raising the inside portion of the ski/boot interface thereby flattening the ski. Experiment at home w/duct tape and you'll see what I mean.
See, my reasonning would have been opposite to that as well. In your case, by raising the inside of the foot, wouldn't you further favour the inside edges?
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski_steep
I believe there are exceptions to this rule, but think of it this way: If you're knock kneed (like I am), that means you favor the inside edges of your ski. In order to alleviate this and get the ski flat, you want to build up the inside area of the ski/boot. This will have the effect of raising the inside portion of the ski/boot interface thereby flattening the ski. Experiment at home w/duct tape and you'll see what I mean.
The flip side inside thick would create eeven more pressure on your inside edge so instead you would fill in the space on the outside to equalize the pressure on the ski rather than try to move your knee with the inside thick method, by going thick outside.

Unfortunately there are no rules here and it is art rather than science. Different adjustments work differently for different people.

You must experiment with tape canting before making permanent changes to your gear.

$50.00 cannot be for price to plane your boots and rebuild the toe & heel lugs.

Be sure your cuffs have been properly adjusted as a first step before anything more drastic.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
The flip side is this would create eeven more pressure on your inside edge so instead you would fill in the space on the outside to equalize the pressure on the ski rather than try to move your knee with the inside thick method.
Are you saying I have it backwards?
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
The flip side inside thick would create even more pressure on your inside edge, so instead you would fill in the space on the outside to equalize the pressure on the ski rather than try to move your knee with the inside thick method by trying
outside thick
Unfortunately there are no rules here and it is art rather than science. Different adjustments work differently for different people.

You must experiment with tape canting before making permanent changes to your gear.

$50.00 cannot be the entire price to plane your boots and rebuild the toe & heel lugs to DIN standards as well as stance analysis.

Be sure your cuffs have been properly adjusted as a first step before anything more drastic.
No, just saying, no absolutes when it comes to canting, you must explore all options and solutions thoroughly.
post #19 of 29
If you use duct tape, how do you temporarily adjust the lugs?
post #20 of 29

Boot alignment

Craig McNeil explains it pretty well at this website. I first learned about canting properly in a book, "The Athletic Skier". When I started experimenting I found the improvement profound and I started helping me friends and children. Good luck, LewBob

http://www.howtoski.net/sub_boots3.htm
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski_steep
I believe there are exceptions to this rule, but think of it this way: If you're knock kneed (like I am), that means you favor the inside edges of your ski. In order to alleviate this and get the ski flat, you want to build up the inside area of the ski/boot. This will have the effect of raising the inside portion of the ski/boot interface thereby flattening the ski. Experiment at home w/duct tape and you'll see what I mean.
the key is the goal of flattening the ski,

and NOT correcting the bowleggedness/knocked knees.
post #22 of 29
The goal is to get the center of the knee joint just inside the center of the ski when the legs are flexed. LewBob
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
The goal is to get the center of the knee joint just inside the center of the ski when the legs are flexed. LewBob
Not always,

the goal is to get equal pressure on the ski. What difference does it make where your knee is?

Does it make sense to change someone's natural physiology, or to compensate for that physiology? I submit it depends and works differently for different people.

Nothiing set in stone with canting!
post #24 of 29
I charge $175.00 for a boot planing with lifter plates installed. Also, a comprehensive alignment consult will cost you an additional $75.00. (usually about an hour long) When I meet with a patient (or customer), many different types of symmetry and balance will be addressed. Initially, the gross bootfit will be addressed to assess the
match between skier and boot. If need be, a footbed or orthotic ($175.00) will be manufactured to balance the foot inside the shell and leg length will be checked and corrected (or accomodated for) by shimming the footbed, orthotic or boot sole. Next, any excess abduction (toe out) or adduction (toe in) will be measured and corrected by specific insole or zeppa shimming. (Phew...Are we almost done yet, I need to ski!) Ski boots are aligned to leg angle at this point (medial/lateral) using boot supplied shaft alignment adjusters. Knee angle is measured to indicate (medial/lateral)
misalignment and recommend a course of action. (usually duct tape first)
(seeing light at end of tunnel) Fore aft alignment is measured and changes to the zeppa (delta) and upper cuff angle are completed.


Go ski and see if changes are beneficial.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman
I charge $175.00 for a boot planing with lifter plates installed. Also, a comprehensive alignment consult will cost you an additional $75.00. (usually about an hour long) When I meet with a patient (or customer), many different types of symmetry and balance will be addressed. Initially, the gross bootfit will be addressed to assess the
match between skier and boot. If need be, a footbed or orthotic ($175.00) will be manufactured to balance the foot inside the shell and leg length will be checked and corrected (or accomodated for) by shimming the footbed, orthotic or boot sole. Next, any excess abduction (toe out) or adduction (toe in) will be measured and corrected by specific insole or zeppa shimming. (Phew...Are we almost done yet, I need to ski!) Ski boots are aligned to leg angle at this point (medial/lateral) using boot supplied shaft alignment adjusters. Knee angle is measured to indicate (medial/lateral)
misalignment and recommend a course of action. (usually duct tape first)
(seeing light at end of tunnel) Fore aft alignment is measured and changes to the zeppa (delta) and upper cuff angle are completed.


Go ski and see if changes are beneficial.
Sounds more like it!
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
Craig McNeil explains it pretty well at this website. I first learned about canting properly in a book, "The Athletic Skier". When I started experimenting I found the improvement profound and starting helping me friends. Good luck, LewBob

http://www.howtoski.net/sub_boots3.htm
After reading the info on this link, it has me wondering. Does anyone have any recommendations for an alignment specialist in the New Jersey area?
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
Not always,

the goal is to get equal pressure on the ski. What difference does it make where your knee is?

Does it make sense to change someone's natural physiology, or to compensate for that physiology? I submit it depends and works differently for different people.

Nothiing set in stone with canting!
You are right that nothing is set in stone. However, at least some angulation is done with the knee. If one is bowlegged (or, in my case, has a lot of lower leg curve) the knee is to the outside when on a flat ski. This causes overedging when bringing the knee to the inside to angulate. This makes for very difficult skiing, often a stem or hop turn, fatigue, and a wobbling inside knee. I observed this on both of my boys when they got their first stiff boots. They were both ready to quit skiing until I solved the problem with canting. I used the carpenter square method that McNeil recommends and the change was profound.

Someone who is knock-kneed is underedged and has to compensate with an A-frame stance when edging. By using canting to get the center of the knee mass in the proper position the knock-kneed skier doesn't have to exaggerate angulation to get edge grip. Does this make sense to you?

My current boots are Lange's and 1.5 degree cant soles work perfectly for me, which is pure luck. The ideal knee position will vary from person to person, but I think that the concept of getting the center of knee mass just inside of ski center is a sound starting point. LewBob
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
You are right that nothing is set in stone. However, at least some angulation is done with the knee. If one is bowlegged (or, in my case, has a lot of lower leg curve) the knee is to the outside when on a flat ski. This causes overedging when bringing the knee to the inside to angulate. This makes for very difficult skiing, often a stem or hop turn, fatigue, and a wobbling inside knee. I observed this on both of my boys when they got their first stiff boots. They were both ready to quit skiing until I solved the problem with canting. I used the carpenter square method that McNeil recommends and the change was profound.

Someone who is knock-kneed is underedged and has to compensate with an A-frame stance when edging. By using canting to get the center of the knee mass in the proper position the knock-kneed skier doesn't have to exaggerate angulation to get edge grip. Does this make sense to you?

My current boots are Lange's and 1.5 degree cant soles work perfectly for me, which is pure luck. The ideal knee position will vary from person to person, but I think that the concept of getting the center of knee mass just inside of ski center is a sound starting point. LewBob
No actually, I am a little confused. if your ski is flat, where is the problem.

In my experience , the issue has been that where the knee goes naturally creates a ski that is not flat on the snow.

How is this any different then a person who's knee is centered and moves their knee too far inside & overedges.

In your situation where you are bowlegged with a flat ski, you should not have to move your knee as much to get on your inside edge. So don't.

there is also a theory that says your athleticism can overcome all of this by making whatever movements are necessary to get your skis to perform as desired.

It still seem s to me the problems arise when your natural stance causes your skis to not be flat.

The fianl analysis is when you hit the snow.

My take is someone needs to provide on snow analysis & video. then go to shop make the adjustments and hit the hill again for on snow confirmation.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork
After reading the info on this link, it has me wondering. Does anyone have any recommendations for an alignment specialist in the New Jersey area?
http://www.surefoot.com
has a store close to Jersey in Manhattan. They do everything from alignment to full custom boots. Yes, they are expensive but thy do the right job
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion